Alaska  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Understand how the earth changes because of plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, erosion and deposition, and living things (Processes that Shape the Earth).

Grade: 10
Understand how the earth changes because of plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, erosion and deposition, and living things (Processes that Shape the Earth).

Grade: 11
Understand how the earth changes because of plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, erosion and deposition, and living things (Processes that Shape the Earth).

Grade: 12
Understand how the earth changes because of plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, erosion and deposition, and living things (Processes that Shape the Earth).

Alabama  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students will practice listening and viewing skills in a variety of situations: Lectures.

Students will practice listening and viewing skills in a variety of situations: Multimedia presentations.

Grade: 10
Students will demonstrate listening skills: Standard English recognition.

Students will apply personal study skills: Listening actively.

Students will apply personal study skills: Reviewing with partner.

Grade: 11
Students will participate constructively in classroom and small-group discussion: Listening.

Grade: 12
Students will listen effectively in a wide range of circumstances.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will explain techniques for determining the age and composition of Earth and the universe: Using radiometric age methods to compute the age of Earth; Using expanding universe measurements to determine the age of the universe; Identifying techniques for evaluating the composition of objects in space

Students will describe layers of Earth, including the lithosphere, asthenosphere, outer core, and inner core: Identifying methods for determining the composition of Earth's lithosphere ; Describing the composition of Earth's lithosphere; Relating the types of lithosphere to tectonic plates; Comparing the temperature, density, and composition of Earth's crust to that of the mantle and outer and inner cores

Students will explain natural phenomena that shape the surface of Earth, including rock cycles, plate motions and interactions, erosion and deposition, volcanism, earthquakes, weathering, and tides.

Students will explain the concept of geological time within the framework of the geologic time scale: Describing how sedimentary rocks provide a record of evolutionary change; Describing the role of fossils in determining the age of strata; Identifying the geological time scales, including eon, era, period, and epoch; Identifying relative and absolute dating methods

Students will explain the mechanism of plate tectonics: Explaining processes that cause earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; Identifying Earth's main tectonic plates; Describing faults and folds and their relationships to tectonic forces; Describing technologies used to measure and forecast earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

Grade: 10
Students will explain techniques for determining the age and composition of Earth and the universe: Using radiometric age methods to compute the age of Earth; Using expanding universe measurements to determine the age of the universe; Identifying techniques for evaluating the composition of objects in space

Students will describe layers of Earth, including the lithosphere, asthenosphere, outer core, and inner core: Identifying methods for determining the composition of Earth's lithosphere ; Describing the composition of Earth's lithosphere; Relating the types of lithosphere to tectonic plates; Comparing the temperature, density, and composition of Earth's crust to that of the mantle and outer and inner cores

Students will explain natural phenomena that shape the surface of Earth, including rock cycles, plate motions and interactions, erosion and deposition, volcanism, earthquakes, weathering, and tides.

Students will explain the concept of geological time within the framework of the geologic time scale: Describing how sedimentary rocks provide a record of evolutionary change; Describing the role of fossils in determining the age of strata; Identifying the geological time scales, including eon, era, period, and epoch; Identifying relative and absolute dating methods

Students will explain the mechanism of plate tectonics: Explaining processes that cause earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; Identifying Earth's main tectonic plates; Describing faults and folds and their relationships to tectonic forces; Describing technologies used to measure and forecast earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

Grade: 11
Students will explain techniques for determining the age and composition of Earth and the universe: Using radiometric age methods to compute the age of Earth; Using expanding universe measurements to determine the age of the universe; Identifying techniques for evaluating the composition of objects in space

Students will describe layers of Earth, including the lithosphere, asthenosphere, outer core, and inner core: Identifying methods for determining the composition of Earth's lithosphere ; Describing the composition of Earth's lithosphere; Relating the types of lithosphere to tectonic plates; Comparing the temperature, density, and composition of Earth's crust to that of the mantle and outer and inner cores

Students will explain natural phenomena that shape the surface of Earth, including rock cycles, plate motions and interactions, erosion and deposition, volcanism, earthquakes, weathering, and tides.

Students will explain the concept of geological time within the framework of the geologic time scale: Describing how sedimentary rocks provide a record of evolutionary change; Describing the role of fossils in determining the age of strata; Identifying the geological time scales, including eon, era, period, and epoch; Identifying relative and absolute dating methods

Students will explain the mechanism of plate tectonics: Explaining processes that cause earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; Identifying Earth's main tectonic plates; Describing faults and folds and their relationships to tectonic forces; Describing technologies used to measure and forecast earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

Grade: 12
Students will explain techniques for determining the age and composition of Earth and the universe: Using radiometric age methods to compute the age of Earth; Using expanding universe measurements to determine the age of the universe; Identifying techniques for evaluating the composition of objects in space

Students will describe layers of Earth, including the lithosphere, asthenosphere, outer core, and inner core: Identifying methods for determining the composition of Earth's lithosphere ; Describing the composition of Earth's lithosphere; Relating the types of lithosphere to tectonic plates; Comparing the temperature, density, and composition of Earth's crust to that of the mantle and outer and inner cores

Students will explain natural phenomena that shape the surface of Earth, including rock cycles, plate motions and interactions, erosion and deposition, volcanism, earthquakes, weathering, and tides.

Students will explain the concept of geological time within the framework of the geologic time scale: Describing how sedimentary rocks provide a record of evolutionary change; Describing the role of fossils in determining the age of strata; Identifying the geological time scales, including eon, era, period, and epoch; Identifying relative and absolute dating methods

Students will explain the mechanism of plate tectonics: Explaining processes that cause earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; Identifying Earth's main tectonic plates; Describing faults and folds and their relationships to tectonic forces; Describing technologies used to measure and forecast earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

Arkansas  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Establish a purpose for listening and identify relevant information.

Grade: 10
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Identify barriers to listening and generate methods to overcome them.

Grade: 11
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Identify barriers to listening and generate methods to overcome them.

Grade: 12
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Identify barriers to listening and generate methods to overcome them .

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain the features of the Earth's composition and geological phenomena. Utilize the plate tectonics, the continental drift, and the sea-floor spreading theories.

Given measurements of weather conditions, relate them to the temperature, pressure, density, ideal gas law, and buoyancy of air.

Grade: 10
Explain the features of the Earth's composition and geological phenomena. Utilize the plate tectonics, the continental drift, and the sea-floor spreading theories.

Given measurements of weather conditions, relate them to the temperature, pressure, density, ideal gas law, and buoyancy of air.

Grade: 11
Explain the features of the Earth's composition and geological phenomena. Utilize the plate tectonics, the continental drift, and the sea-floor spreading theories.

Given measurements of weather conditions, relate them to the temperature, pressure, density, ideal gas law, and buoyancy of air.

Grade: 12
Explain the features of the Earth's composition and geological phenomena. Utilize the plate tectonics, the continental drift, and the sea-floor spreading theories.

Given measurements of weather conditions, relate them to the temperature, pressure, density, ideal gas law, and buoyancy of air.

Arizona  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Analyze how patterns in the fossil record, nuclear chemistry, geology, molecular biology, and geographical distribution give support to the theory of organic evolution through natural selection over billions of years and the resulting present day biodiversity.

Explain how the rock cycle is related to plate tectonics.

Demonstrate how the hydrosphere links the biosphere, lithosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere.

Earth History/Evolution: Distinguish between relative and absolute geologic dating techniques.

Earth History/Evolution: Investigate scientific theories of how life originated on Earth (high temperature, low oxygen, clay catalyst model).

Earth History/Evolution: Describe how life on Earth has influenced the evolution of the Earth's systems.

Earth History/Evolution: Sequence major events in the Earth's evolution (e.g., mass extinctions, glacial episodes) using relative and absolute dating data.

Earth History/Evolution: Analyze patterns in the fossil record related to the theory of organic evolution.

Grade: 10
Analyze how patterns in the fossil record, nuclear chemistry, geology, molecular biology, and geographical distribution give support to the theory of organic evolution through natural selection over billions of years and the resulting present day biodiversity.

Explain how the rock cycle is related to plate tectonics.

Demonstrate how the hydrosphere links the biosphere, lithosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere.

Earth History/Evolution: Distinguish between relative and absolute geologic dating techniques.

Earth History/Evolution: Investigate scientific theories of how life originated on Earth (high temperature, low oxygen, clay catalyst model).

Earth History/Evolution: Describe how life on Earth has influenced the evolution of the Earth's systems.

Earth History/Evolution: Sequence major events in the Earth's evolution (e.g., mass extinctions, glacial episodes) using relative and absolute dating data.

Earth History/Evolution: Analyze patterns in the fossil record related to the theory of organic evolution.

Grade: 11
Analyze how patterns in the fossil record, nuclear chemistry, geology, molecular biology, and geographical distribution give support to the theory of organic evolution through natural selection over billions of years and the resulting present day biodiversity.

Explain how the rock cycle is related to plate tectonics.

Demonstrate how the hydrosphere links the biosphere, lithosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere.

Earth History/Evolution: Distinguish between relative and absolute geologic dating techniques.

Earth History/Evolution: Investigate scientific theories of how life originated on Earth (high temperature, low oxygen, clay catalyst model).

Earth History/Evolution: Describe how life on Earth has influenced the evolution of the Earth's systems.

Earth History/Evolution: Sequence major events in the Earth's evolution (e.g., mass extinctions, glacial episodes) using relative and absolute dating data.

Earth History/Evolution: Analyze patterns in the fossil record related to the theory of organic evolution.

Grade: 12
Analyze how patterns in the fossil record, nuclear chemistry, geology, molecular biology, and geographical distribution give support to the theory of organic evolution through natural selection over billions of years and the resulting present day biodiversity.

Explain how the rock cycle is related to plate tectonics.

Demonstrate how the hydrosphere links the biosphere, lithosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere.

Earth History/Evolution: Distinguish between relative and absolute geologic dating techniques.

Earth History/Evolution: Investigate scientific theories of how life originated on Earth (high temperature, low oxygen, clay catalyst model).

Earth History/Evolution: Describe how life on Earth has influenced the evolution of the Earth's systems.

Earth History/Evolution: Sequence major events in the Earth's evolution (e.g., mass extinctions, glacial episodes) using relative and absolute dating data.

Earth History/Evolution: Analyze patterns in the fossil record related to the theory of organic evolution.

California  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, diction, and syntax.

Grade: 10
Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Assess how language and delivery affect the mood and tone of the oral communication and make an impact on the audience.

Grade: 11
Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify logical fallacies used in oral addresses (e.g., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

Grade: 12
Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify logical fallacies used in oral addresses (e.g., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students know reproductive or geographic isolation affects speciation.

Students know how to analyze fossil evidence with regard to biological diversity, episodic speciation, and mass extinction.

Students know how several independent molecular clocks, calibrated against each other and combined with evidence from the fossil record, can help to estimate how long ago various groups of organisms diverged evolutionarily from one another.

Students know the evidence from Earth and moon rocks indicates that the solar system was formed from a nebular cloud of dust and gas approximately 4.6 billion years ago.

Students know features of the ocean floor (magnetic patterns, age, and sea-floor topography) provide evidence of plate tectonics.

Students know the principal structures that form at the three different kinds of plate boundaries.

Students know how to explain the properties of rocks based on the physical and chemical conditions in which they formed, including plate tectonic processes.

Students know the explanation for the location and properties of volcanoes that are due to hot spots and the explanation for those that are due to subduction.

Students know the different atmospheric gases that absorb the Earth's thermal radiation and the mechanism and significance of the greenhouse effect.

Students know the differing greenhouse conditions on Earth, Mars, and Venus; the origins of those conditions; and the climatic consequences of each.

Students know how differential heating of Earth results in circulation patterns in the atmosphere and oceans that globally distribute the heat.

Students know the interaction of wind patterns, ocean currents, and mountain ranges results in the global pattern of latitudinal bands of rain forests and deserts.

Students know features of the ENSO (El Niqo southern oscillation) cycle in terms of sea-surface and air temperature variations across the Pacific and some climatic results of this cycle.

Students know weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy into and out of the atmosphere.

Students know how Earth's climate has changed over time, corresponding to changes in Earth's geography, atmospheric composition, and other factors, such as solar radiation and plate movement.

Students know the carbon cycle of photosynthesis and respiration and the nitrogen cycle.

Students know the global carbon cycle: the different physical and chemical forms of carbon in the atmosphere, oceans, biomass, fossil fuels, and the movement of carbon among these reservoirs.

Students know the movement of matter among reservoirs is driven by Earth's internal and external sources of energy.

Students know the relative residence times and flow characteristics of carbon in and out of its different reservoirs.

Students know the thermal structure and chemical composition of the atmosphere.

Students know how the composition of Earth's atmosphere has evolved over geologic time and know the effect of outgassing, the variations of carbon dioxide concentration, and the origin of atmospheric oxygen.

Students know the location of the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere, its role in absorbing ultraviolet radiation, and the way in which this layer varies both naturally and in response to human activities.

Analyze the locations, sequences, or time intervals that are characteristic of natural phenomena (e.g., relative ages of rocks, locations of planets over time, and succession of species in an ecosystem).

Grade: 10
Students know reproductive or geographic isolation affects speciation.

Students know how to analyze fossil evidence with regard to biological diversity, episodic speciation, and mass extinction.

Students know how several independent molecular clocks, calibrated against each other and combined with evidence from the fossil record, can help to estimate how long ago various groups of organisms diverged evolutionarily from one another.

Students know the evidence from Earth and moon rocks indicates that the solar system was formed from a nebular cloud of dust and gas approximately 4.6 billion years ago.

Students know features of the ocean floor (magnetic patterns, age, and sea-floor topography) provide evidence of plate tectonics.

Students know the principal structures that form at the three different kinds of plate boundaries.

Students know how to explain the properties of rocks based on the physical and chemical conditions in which they formed, including plate tectonic processes.

Students know the explanation for the location and properties of volcanoes that are due to hot spots and the explanation for those that are due to subduction.

Students know the different atmospheric gases that absorb the Earth's thermal radiation and the mechanism and significance of the greenhouse effect.

Students know the differing greenhouse conditions on Earth, Mars, and Venus; the origins of those conditions; and the climatic consequences of each.

Students know how differential heating of Earth results in circulation patterns in the atmosphere and oceans that globally distribute the heat.

Students know the interaction of wind patterns, ocean currents, and mountain ranges results in the global pattern of latitudinal bands of rain forests and deserts.

Students know features of the ENSO (El Niqo southern oscillation) cycle in terms of sea-surface and air temperature variations across the Pacific and some climatic results of this cycle.

Students know weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy into and out of the atmosphere.

Students know how Earth's climate has changed over time, corresponding to changes in Earth's geography, atmospheric composition, and other factors, such as solar radiation and plate movement.

Students know the carbon cycle of photosynthesis and respiration and the nitrogen cycle.

Students know the global carbon cycle: the different physical and chemical forms of carbon in the atmosphere, oceans, biomass, fossil fuels, and the movement of carbon among these reservoirs.

Students know the movement of matter among reservoirs is driven by Earth's internal and external sources of energy.

Students know the relative residence times and flow characteristics of carbon in and out of its different reservoirs.

Students know the thermal structure and chemical composition of the atmosphere.

Students know how the composition of Earth's atmosphere has evolved over geologic time and know the effect of outgassing, the variations of carbon dioxide concentration, and the origin of atmospheric oxygen.

Students know the location of the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere, its role in absorbing ultraviolet radiation, and the way in which this layer varies both naturally and in response to human activities.

Analyze the locations, sequences, or time intervals that are characteristic of natural phenomena (e.g., relative ages of rocks, locations of planets over time, and succession of species in an ecosystem).

Grade: 11
Students know reproductive or geographic isolation affects speciation.

Students know how to analyze fossil evidence with regard to biological diversity, episodic speciation, and mass extinction.

Students know how several independent molecular clocks, calibrated against each other and combined with evidence from the fossil record, can help to estimate how long ago various groups of organisms diverged evolutionarily from one another.

Students know the evidence from Earth and moon rocks indicates that the solar system was formed from a nebular cloud of dust and gas approximately 4.6 billion years ago.

Students know features of the ocean floor (magnetic patterns, age, and sea-floor topography) provide evidence of plate tectonics.

Students know the principal structures that form at the three different kinds of plate boundaries.

Students know how to explain the properties of rocks based on the physical and chemical conditions in which they formed, including plate tectonic processes.

Students know the explanation for the location and properties of volcanoes that are due to hot spots and the explanation for those that are due to subduction.

Students know the different atmospheric gases that absorb the Earth's thermal radiation and the mechanism and significance of the greenhouse effect.

Students know the differing greenhouse conditions on Earth, Mars, and Venus; the origins of those conditions; and the climatic consequences of each.

Students know how differential heating of Earth results in circulation patterns in the atmosphere and oceans that globally distribute the heat.

Students know the interaction of wind patterns, ocean currents, and mountain ranges results in the global pattern of latitudinal bands of rain forests and deserts.

Students know features of the ENSO (El Niqo southern oscillation) cycle in terms of sea-surface and air temperature variations across the Pacific and some climatic results of this cycle.

Students know weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy into and out of the atmosphere.

Students know how Earth's climate has changed over time, corresponding to changes in Earth's geography, atmospheric composition, and other factors, such as solar radiation and plate movement.

Students know the carbon cycle of photosynthesis and respiration and the nitrogen cycle.

Students know the global carbon cycle: the different physical and chemical forms of carbon in the atmosphere, oceans, biomass, fossil fuels, and the movement of carbon among these reservoirs.

Students know the movement of matter among reservoirs is driven by Earth's internal and external sources of energy.

Students know the relative residence times and flow characteristics of carbon in and out of its different reservoirs.

Students know the thermal structure and chemical composition of the atmosphere.

Students know how the composition of Earth's atmosphere has evolved over geologic time and know the effect of outgassing, the variations of carbon dioxide concentration, and the origin of atmospheric oxygen.

Students know the location of the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere, its role in absorbing ultraviolet radiation, and the way in which this layer varies both naturally and in response to human activities.

Analyze the locations, sequences, or time intervals that are characteristic of natural phenomena (e.g., relative ages of rocks, locations of planets over time, and succession of species in an ecosystem).

Grade: 12
Students know reproductive or geographic isolation affects speciation.

Students know how to analyze fossil evidence with regard to biological diversity, episodic speciation, and mass extinction.

Students know how several independent molecular clocks, calibrated against each other and combined with evidence from the fossil record, can help to estimate how long ago various groups of organisms diverged evolutionarily from one another.

Students know the evidence from Earth and moon rocks indicates that the solar system was formed from a nebular cloud of dust and gas approximately 4.6 billion years ago.

Students know features of the ocean floor (magnetic patterns, age, and sea-floor topography) provide evidence of plate tectonics.

Students know the principal structures that form at the three different kinds of plate boundaries.

Students know how to explain the properties of rocks based on the physical and chemical conditions in which they formed, including plate tectonic processes.

Students know the explanation for the location and properties of volcanoes that are due to hot spots and the explanation for those that are due to subduction.

Students know the different atmospheric gases that absorb the Earth's thermal radiation and the mechanism and significance of the greenhouse effect.

Students know the differing greenhouse conditions on Earth, Mars, and Venus; the origins of those conditions; and the climatic consequences of each.

Students know how differential heating of Earth results in circulation patterns in the atmosphere and oceans that globally distribute the heat.

Students know the interaction of wind patterns, ocean currents, and mountain ranges results in the global pattern of latitudinal bands of rain forests and deserts.

Students know features of the ENSO (El Niqo southern oscillation) cycle in terms of sea-surface and air temperature variations across the Pacific and some climatic results of this cycle.

Students know weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy into and out of the atmosphere.

Students know how Earth's climate has changed over time, corresponding to changes in Earth's geography, atmospheric composition, and other factors, such as solar radiation and plate movement.

Students know the carbon cycle of photosynthesis and respiration and the nitrogen cycle.

Students know the global carbon cycle: the different physical and chemical forms of carbon in the atmosphere, oceans, biomass, fossil fuels, and the movement of carbon among these reservoirs.

Students know the movement of matter among reservoirs is driven by Earth's internal and external sources of energy.

Students know the relative residence times and flow characteristics of carbon in and out of its different reservoirs.

Students know the thermal structure and chemical composition of the atmosphere.

Students know how the composition of Earth's atmosphere has evolved over geologic time and know the effect of outgassing, the variations of carbon dioxide concentration, and the origin of atmospheric oxygen.

Students know the location of the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere, its role in absorbing ultraviolet radiation, and the way in which this layer varies both naturally and in response to human activities.

Analyze the locations, sequences, or time intervals that are characteristic of natural phenomena (e.g., relative ages of rocks, locations of planets over time, and succession of species in an ecosystem).

Canada  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 10
Describe the major characteristics of the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere, and explain their relationship to Earth's biosphere.

Describe and explain the greenhouse effect, and the role of various gases - including methane, carbon dioxide and water vapour - in determining the scope of the greenhouse effect.

Describe, in general terms, how thermal energy is transferred through the atmosphere (i.e., global wind patterns, jet stream, Coriolis effect, weather systems) and through the hydrosphere (i.e., ocean currents, large bodies of water) from latitudes of net radiation surplus to latitudes of net radiation deficit, resulting in a variety of climatic zones (e.g., analyze static and animated satellite images).

Explain how thermal energy transfer through the atmosphere and hydrosphere affects climate.

Identifying and describing the three layers of Earth: lithosphere, asthenosphere and mesosphere, in terms of density, composition and thickness.

Describing the theory of plate tectonics and identifying pieces of evidence that support the theory; e.g., location of volcanoes and earthquakes, ocean floor spreading, patterns in mountain structure.

Describing how radioactive decay could be the source of geothermal energy.

Explaining how seismic waves are used to provide information about the internal structure of Earth.

Explaining why it is believed that Earth's first atmosphere was composed of gases released from volcanoes.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by evaluating the theory of plate tectonics in terms of its ability to explain and predict changes in Earth's surface.

Defining radioisotope, radioactive decay and half-life.

Describing the radiometric procedures used to estimate the age of minerals and fossils.

Explaining how the layers in sedimentary rock, together with the fossils they contain, form a chronology of natural history.

Describing common types of fossilization; i.e., the actual remains of a life form, an imprint or mold, a trace or some form of track, trail or burrow left by an organism.

Describing the main characteristics of environmental and life forms in the four eras of the geological time scale: Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by identifying examples of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by interpreting data from radiometric dating of minerals and fossils, using the concept of half-life.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by inferring the relative ages of rock layers, using geologic principles.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making inferences about the characteristics of life forms, based on the fossil record.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making inferences about climate, based on the fossil record.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by drawing a timeline of the geological history of Earth.

Explaining why oxygen was not a significant component of Earth's atmosphere until photosynthesis and chlorophyll evolved.

Describing the organic theory of formation of fossil fuels.

Explaining how changes in the composition of the atmosphere could cause major changes in Earth's climate.

Discussing current predictions of climate change in a geological time frame.

Explaining why carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are much lower now than they were in Earth's early history.

Outlining, briefly, the evidence indicating that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are involved in the depletion of the ozone layer .

Describing how Earth's atmosphere absorbs certain frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by observing evidence of radioactive decay in a cloud chamber or on a video.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?formulating hypotheses about the adaptive significance of the variations in a range of homologous structures in extant (still existing) and extinct organisms.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by of superposition.

Grade: 11
Describe the major characteristics of the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere, and explain their relationship to Earth's biosphere.

Describe and explain the greenhouse effect, and the role of various gases - including methane, carbon dioxide and water vapour - in determining the scope of the greenhouse effect.

Describe, in general terms, how thermal energy is transferred through the atmosphere (i.e., global wind patterns, jet stream, Coriolis effect, weather systems) and through the hydrosphere (i.e., ocean currents, large bodies of water) from latitudes of net radiation surplus to latitudes of net radiation deficit, resulting in a variety of climatic zones (e.g., analyze static and animated satellite images).

Explain how thermal energy transfer through the atmosphere and hydrosphere affects climate.

Identifying and describing the three layers of Earth: lithosphere, asthenosphere and mesosphere, in terms of density, composition and thickness.

Describing the theory of plate tectonics and identifying pieces of evidence that support the theory; e.g., location of volcanoes and earthquakes, ocean floor spreading, patterns in mountain structure.

Describing how radioactive decay could be the source of geothermal energy.

Explaining how seismic waves are used to provide information about the internal structure of Earth.

Explaining why it is believed that Earth's first atmosphere was composed of gases released from volcanoes.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by evaluating the theory of plate tectonics in terms of its ability to explain and predict changes in Earth's surface.

Defining radioisotope, radioactive decay and half-life.

Describing the radiometric procedures used to estimate the age of minerals and fossils.

Explaining how the layers in sedimentary rock, together with the fossils they contain, form a chronology of natural history.

Describing common types of fossilization; i.e., the actual remains of a life form, an imprint or mold, a trace or some form of track, trail or burrow left by an organism.

Describing the main characteristics of environmental and life forms in the four eras of the geological time scale: Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by identifying examples of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by interpreting data from radiometric dating of minerals and fossils, using the concept of half-life.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by inferring the relative ages of rock layers, using geologic principles.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making inferences about the characteristics of life forms, based on the fossil record.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making inferences about climate, based on the fossil record.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by drawing a timeline of the geological history of Earth.

Explaining why oxygen was not a significant component of Earth's atmosphere until photosynthesis and chlorophyll evolved.

Describing the organic theory of formation of fossil fuels.

Explaining how changes in the composition of the atmosphere could cause major changes in Earth's climate.

Discussing current predictions of climate change in a geological time frame.

Explaining why carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are much lower now than they were in Earth's early history.

Outlining, briefly, the evidence indicating that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are involved in the depletion of the ozone layer .

Describing how Earth's atmosphere absorbs certain frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by observing evidence of radioactive decay in a cloud chamber or on a video.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?formulating hypotheses about the adaptive significance of the variations in a range of homologous structures in extant (still existing) and extinct organisms.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by of superposition.

Grade: 12
Describe the major characteristics of the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere, and explain their relationship to Earth's biosphere.

Describe and explain the greenhouse effect, and the role of various gases - including methane, carbon dioxide and water vapour - in determining the scope of the greenhouse effect.

Describe, in general terms, how thermal energy is transferred through the atmosphere (i.e., global wind patterns, jet stream, Coriolis effect, weather systems) and through the hydrosphere (i.e., ocean currents, large bodies of water) from latitudes of net radiation surplus to latitudes of net radiation deficit, resulting in a variety of climatic zones (e.g., analyze static and animated satellite images).

Explain how thermal energy transfer through the atmosphere and hydrosphere affects climate.

Identifying and describing the three layers of Earth: lithosphere, asthenosphere and mesosphere, in terms of density, composition and thickness.

Describing the theory of plate tectonics and identifying pieces of evidence that support the theory; e.g., location of volcanoes and earthquakes, ocean floor spreading, patterns in mountain structure.

Describing how radioactive decay could be the source of geothermal energy.

Explaining how seismic waves are used to provide information about the internal structure of Earth.

Explaining why it is believed that Earth's first atmosphere was composed of gases released from volcanoes.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by evaluating the theory of plate tectonics in terms of its ability to explain and predict changes in Earth's surface.

Defining radioisotope, radioactive decay and half-life.

Describing the radiometric procedures used to estimate the age of minerals and fossils.

Explaining how the layers in sedimentary rock, together with the fossils they contain, form a chronology of natural history.

Describing common types of fossilization; i.e., the actual remains of a life form, an imprint or mold, a trace or some form of track, trail or burrow left by an organism.

Describing the main characteristics of environmental and life forms in the four eras of the geological time scale: Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by identifying examples of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by interpreting data from radiometric dating of minerals and fossils, using the concept of half-life.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by inferring the relative ages of rock layers, using geologic principles.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making inferences about the characteristics of life forms, based on the fossil record.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making inferences about climate, based on the fossil record.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by drawing a timeline of the geological history of Earth.

Explaining why oxygen was not a significant component of Earth's atmosphere until photosynthesis and chlorophyll evolved.

Describing the organic theory of formation of fossil fuels.

Explaining how changes in the composition of the atmosphere could cause major changes in Earth's climate.

Discussing current predictions of climate change in a geological time frame.

Explaining why carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are much lower now than they were in Earth's early history.

Outlining, briefly, the evidence indicating that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are involved in the depletion of the ozone layer .

Describing how Earth's atmosphere absorbs certain frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by observing evidence of radioactive decay in a cloud chamber or on a video.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?formulating hypotheses about the adaptive significance of the variations in a range of homologous structures in extant (still existing) and extinct organisms.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by of superposition.

Colorado  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describing the composition and structure of Earth's interior.

Using the theory of plate tectonics to explain relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Using evidence (for example, fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating) to investigate how Earth has changed or remained constant over short and long periods of time (for example, Mountain St. Helens' eruption).

Analyzing the structure of, and changes in, the atmosphere, and its significance for life on Earth.

Grade: 10
Describing the composition and structure of Earth's interior.

Using the theory of plate tectonics to explain relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Using evidence (for example, fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating) to investigate how Earth has changed or remained constant over short and long periods of time (for example, Mountain St. Helens' eruption).

Analyzing the structure of, and changes in, the atmosphere, and its significance for life on Earth.

Grade: 11
Describing the composition and structure of Earth's interior.

Using the theory of plate tectonics to explain relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Using evidence (for example, fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating) to investigate how Earth has changed or remained constant over short and long periods of time (for example, Mountain St. Helens' eruption).

Analyzing the structure of, and changes in, the atmosphere, and its significance for life on Earth.

Grade: 12
Describing the composition and structure of Earth's interior.

Using the theory of plate tectonics to explain relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Using evidence (for example, fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating) to investigate how Earth has changed or remained constant over short and long periods of time (for example, Mountain St. Helens' eruption).

Analyzing the structure of, and changes in, the atmosphere, and its significance for life on Earth.

Connecticut  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 10
Explain how the current theory of evolution provides a scientific explanation for fossil records of ancient life forms.

Grade: 11
Explain how the current theory of evolution provides a scientific explanation for fossil records of ancient life forms.

Grade: 12
Explain how the current theory of evolution provides a scientific explanation for fossil records of ancient life forms.

District of Columbia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student listens and interprets speaker's message.

The student detects speaker's slant, bias or stance.

The student comprehends purpose, theme, and point of view.

The student evaluates for purpose, fact/opinion, accuracy of evidence and organization.

Grade: 10
The student detects logic in arguments.

The student understands the speaker's bias.

The student critiques speaker's effectiveness.

The student detects fallacies or soundness in the speaker's argument.

The student identifies the speaker's tone.

Grade: 11
The student detects bias and other inconsistencies.

The student identifies specific sequence in speaker's conversations.

The student critiques objectively.

Grade: 12
The student understands the difference between listening and hearing.

The student critiques a public speaking performance using appropriate criteria.

The student critiques objectively.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Changes Over Time: The student examines diversity of fossils and extant organisms to know that the theory of natural selection provides a scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Grade: 10
Changes Over Time: The student examines diversity of fossils and extant organisms to know that the theory of natural selection provides a scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Grade: 11
Changes Over Time: The student examines diversity of fossils and extant organisms to know that the theory of natural selection provides a scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Grade: 12
Changes Over Time: The student examines diversity of fossils and extant organisms to know that the theory of natural selection provides a scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Delaware  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Grade: 10
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Grade: 11
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Grade: 12
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Components of Earth: Students should know that a mixture of gases, water vapor, and solid particles comprise the Earth's atmosphere. Variations in atmospheric composition caused by either natural or human activities influence life on Earth.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that the theory of plate tectonics is supported by structural evidence (volcanoes, plateaus, mountain ranges) geophysical evidence (earthquake waves, magnetic reversals in rock), and paleontological evidence (biological similarities between flora and fauna of widely separated continents).

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that movement of tectonic plates releases energy, bringing new materials to Earth's surface, which balances the effects of erosion and weathering.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that physical features of Earth result from a balance of processes that elevate and wear down land surfaces and move materials from higher to lower elevations.

Technology and Applications: Students should know that both relative and absolute means are used to determine the ages of rocks and the sequence of geological events. The relative age of sedimentary rock is determined by the chronological record of geological strata and fossils, and the absolute age is determined by radioactive dating.

Grade: 10
Components of Earth: Students should know that a mixture of gases, water vapor, and solid particles comprise the Earth's atmosphere. Variations in atmospheric composition caused by either natural or human activities influence life on Earth.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that the theory of plate tectonics is supported by structural evidence (volcanoes, plateaus, mountain ranges) geophysical evidence (earthquake waves, magnetic reversals in rock), and paleontological evidence (biological similarities between flora and fauna of widely separated continents).

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that movement of tectonic plates releases energy, bringing new materials to Earth's surface, which balances the effects of erosion and weathering.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that physical features of Earth result from a balance of processes that elevate and wear down land surfaces and move materials from higher to lower elevations.

Technology and Applications: Students should know that both relative and absolute means are used to determine the ages of rocks and the sequence of geological events. The relative age of sedimentary rock is determined by the chronological record of geological strata and fossils, and the absolute age is determined by radioactive dating.

Grade: 11
Components of Earth: Students should know that a mixture of gases, water vapor, and solid particles comprise the Earth's atmosphere. Variations in atmospheric composition caused by either natural or human activities influence life on Earth.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that the theory of plate tectonics is supported by structural evidence (volcanoes, plateaus, mountain ranges) geophysical evidence (earthquake waves, magnetic reversals in rock), and paleontological evidence (biological similarities between flora and fauna of widely separated continents).

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that movement of tectonic plates releases energy, bringing new materials to Earth's surface, which balances the effects of erosion and weathering.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that physical features of Earth result from a balance of processes that elevate and wear down land surfaces and move materials from higher to lower elevations.

Technology and Applications: Students should know that both relative and absolute means are used to determine the ages of rocks and the sequence of geological events. The relative age of sedimentary rock is determined by the chronological record of geological strata and fossils, and the absolute age is determined by radioactive dating.

Grade: 12
Components of Earth: Students should know that a mixture of gases, water vapor, and solid particles comprise the Earth's atmosphere. Variations in atmospheric composition caused by either natural or human activities influence life on Earth.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that the theory of plate tectonics is supported by structural evidence (volcanoes, plateaus, mountain ranges) geophysical evidence (earthquake waves, magnetic reversals in rock), and paleontological evidence (biological similarities between flora and fauna of widely separated continents).

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that movement of tectonic plates releases energy, bringing new materials to Earth's surface, which balances the effects of erosion and weathering.

Interactions Among Earth's Systems: Students should know that physical features of Earth result from a balance of processes that elevate and wear down land surfaces and move materials from higher to lower elevations.

Technology and Applications: Students should know that both relative and absolute means are used to determine the ages of rocks and the sequence of geological events. The relative age of sedimentary rock is determined by the chronological record of geological strata and fossils, and the absolute age is determined by radioactive dating.

Florida  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

Grade: 10
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

Grade: 11
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

Grade: 12
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student knows that the solid crust of Earth consists of slow-moving, separate plates that float on a denser, molten layer of Earth and that these plates interact with each other, changing the Earth's surface in many ways (e.g., forming mountain ranges and rift valleys, causing earthquake and volcanic activity, and forming undersea mountains that can become ocean islands).

The student knows that changes in Earth's climate, geological activity, and life forms may be traced and compared.

The student knows that Earth's systems and organisms are the result of a long, continuous change over time.

Grade: 10
The student knows that the solid crust of Earth consists of slow-moving, separate plates that float on a denser, molten layer of Earth and that these plates interact with each other, changing the Earth's surface in many ways (e.g., forming mountain ranges and rift valleys, causing earthquake and volcanic activity, and forming undersea mountains that can become ocean islands).

The student knows that changes in Earth's climate, geological activity, and life forms may be traced and compared.

The student knows that Earth's systems and organisms are the result of a long, continuous change over time.

Grade: 11
The student knows that the solid crust of Earth consists of slow-moving, separate plates that float on a denser, molten layer of Earth and that these plates interact with each other, changing the Earth's surface in many ways (e.g., forming mountain ranges and rift valleys, causing earthquake and volcanic activity, and forming undersea mountains that can become ocean islands).

The student knows that changes in Earth's climate, geological activity, and life forms may be traced and compared.

The student knows that Earth's systems and organisms are the result of a long, continuous change over time.

Grade: 12
The student knows that the solid crust of Earth consists of slow-moving, separate plates that float on a denser, molten layer of Earth and that these plates interact with each other, changing the Earth's surface in many ways (e.g., forming mountain ranges and rift valleys, causing earthquake and volcanic activity, and forming undersea mountains that can become ocean islands).

The student knows that changes in Earth's climate, geological activity, and life forms may be traced and compared.

The student knows that Earth's systems and organisms are the result of a long, continuous change over time.

Georgia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

Grade: 10
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

Grade: 11
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

Grade: 12
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain the process half-life as related to radioactive decay.

Explain the history of life in terms of biodiversity, ancestry, and the rates of evolution.

Explain how fossil and biochemical evidence support the theory.

Grade: 10
Explain the process half-life as related to radioactive decay.

Explain the history of life in terms of biodiversity, ancestry, and the rates of evolution.

Explain how fossil and biochemical evidence support the theory.

Grade: 11
Explain the process half-life as related to radioactive decay.

Explain the history of life in terms of biodiversity, ancestry, and the rates of evolution.

Explain how fossil and biochemical evidence support the theory.

Grade: 12
Explain the process half-life as related to radioactive decay.

Explain the history of life in terms of biodiversity, ancestry, and the rates of evolution.

Explain how fossil and biochemical evidence support the theory.

Hawaii  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Grade: 10
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Grade: 11
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Grade: 12
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student traces the flow of matter (e.g., CO2, H20) and energy through the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere and its effects on the energy balance of the Earth.

The student describes and/or demonstrates how on of the Earth's processes contributes to the shaping of the Earth (e.g., plate tectonics, weathering and erosion).

The student demonstrates how the Theory of Plate Tectonics accounts for the creation of the Hawaiian Island chain, volcanic activity and earthquakes.

Grade: 10
The student traces the flow of matter (e.g., CO2, H20) and energy through the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere and its effects on the energy balance of the Earth.

The student describes and/or demonstrates how on of the Earth's processes contributes to the shaping of the Earth (e.g., plate tectonics, weathering and erosion).

The student demonstrates how the Theory of Plate Tectonics accounts for the creation of the Hawaiian Island chain, volcanic activity and earthquakes.

Grade: 11
The student traces the flow of matter (e.g., CO2, H20) and energy through the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere and its effects on the energy balance of the Earth.

The student describes and/or demonstrates how on of the Earth's processes contributes to the shaping of the Earth (e.g., plate tectonics, weathering and erosion).

The student demonstrates how the Theory of Plate Tectonics accounts for the creation of the Hawaiian Island chain, volcanic activity and earthquakes.

Grade: 12
The student traces the flow of matter (e.g., CO2, H20) and energy through the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere and its effects on the energy balance of the Earth.

The student describes and/or demonstrates how on of the Earth's processes contributes to the shaping of the Earth (e.g., plate tectonics, weathering and erosion).

The student demonstrates how the Theory of Plate Tectonics accounts for the creation of the Hawaiian Island chain, volcanic activity and earthquakes.

Idaho  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 10
Acquire, interpret, and apply information from a variety of electronic or live sources.

Use listening skills to gain enrichment and information about various cultures.

Demonstrate effective interpersonal listening skills.

Make informed judgments about the purpose, content, organization, and delivery of verbal communications and non-verbal cues.

Grade: 11
Acquire, interpret, and apply information from a variety of electronic or live sources.

Use listening skills to gain enrichment and information about various cultures.

Demonstrate effective interpersonal listening skills.

Make informed judgments about the purpose, content, organization, and delivery of verbal communications and non-verbal cues.

Grade: 12
Acquire, interpret, and apply information from a variety of electronic or live sources.

Use listening skills to gain enrichment and information about various cultures.

Demonstrate effective interpersonal listening skills.

Make informed judgments about the purpose, content, organization, and delivery of verbal communications and non-verbal cues.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Know that the present arises from materials and forms of the past.

Understand evolution as a series of changes, some gradual and some sporadic, that account for present form and function of objects, organisms, and natural or mechanical systems.

Know methods used to estimate geologic time (observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations).

Know that interactions among the solid earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of the earth system. Some activities are observable (earthquakes and volcanic eruptions) but many take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Know that the development of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the earth's atmosphere.

Know that the outward transfer of earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle that propels the plates comprising the earth's surface across the face of the globe.

Grade: 10
Know that the present arises from materials and forms of the past.

Understand evolution as a series of changes, some gradual and some sporadic, that account for present form and function of objects, organisms, and natural or mechanical systems.

Know methods used to estimate geologic time (observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations).

Know that interactions among the solid earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of the earth system. Some activities are observable (earthquakes and volcanic eruptions) but many take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Know that the development of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the earth's atmosphere.

Know that the outward transfer of earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle that propels the plates comprising the earth's surface across the face of the globe.

Grade: 11
Know that the present arises from materials and forms of the past.

Understand evolution as a series of changes, some gradual and some sporadic, that account for present form and function of objects, organisms, and natural or mechanical systems.

Know methods used to estimate geologic time (observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations).

Know that interactions among the solid earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of the earth system. Some activities are observable (earthquakes and volcanic eruptions) but many take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Know that the development of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the earth's atmosphere.

Know that the outward transfer of earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle that propels the plates comprising the earth's surface across the face of the globe.

Grade: 12
Know that the present arises from materials and forms of the past.

Understand evolution as a series of changes, some gradual and some sporadic, that account for present form and function of objects, organisms, and natural or mechanical systems.

Know methods used to estimate geologic time (observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations).

Know that interactions among the solid earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of the earth system. Some activities are observable (earthquakes and volcanic eruptions) but many take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Know that the development of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the earth's atmosphere.

Know that the outward transfer of earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle that propels the plates comprising the earth's surface across the face of the globe.

Illinois  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Apply listening skills as individuals and members of a group in a variety of settings (e.g., lectures, discussions, conversations, team projects, presentations, interviews).

Apply listening skills in practical settings (e.g., classroom note taking, interpersonal conflict situations, giving and receiving directions, evaluating persuasive messages).

Demonstrate understanding of the relationship of verbal and nonverbal messages within a context (e.g., contradictory, supportive, repetitive, substitutive).

Grade: 10
Apply listening skills as individuals and members of a group in a variety of settings (e.g., lectures, discussions, conversations, team projects, presentations, interviews).

Apply listening skills in practical settings (e.g., classroom note taking, interpersonal conflict situations, giving and receiving directions, evaluating persuasive messages).

Demonstrate understanding of the relationship of verbal and nonverbal messages within a context (e.g., contradictory, supportive, repetitive, substitutive).

Grade: 11
Use techniques for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of oral messages.

Use speaking skills to participate in and lead group discussions; analyze the effectiveness of the spoken interactions based upon the ability of the group to achieve its goals.

Grade: 12
Use techniques for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of oral messages.

Use speaking skills to participate in and lead group discussions; analyze the effectiveness of the spoken interactions based upon the ability of the group to achieve its goals.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe processes by which organisms change over time using evidence from comparative anatomy and physiology, embryology, the fossil record, genetics and biochemistry.

Explain how external and internal energy sources drive Earth processes (e.g., solar energy drives weather patterns; internal heat drives plate tectonics).

Describe how rock sequences and fossil remains are used to interpret the age and changes in the Earth.

Grade: 10
Describe processes by which organisms change over time using evidence from comparative anatomy and physiology, embryology, the fossil record, genetics and biochemistry.

Explain how external and internal energy sources drive Earth processes (e.g., solar energy drives weather patterns; internal heat drives plate tectonics).

Describe how rock sequences and fossil remains are used to interpret the age and changes in the Earth.

Indiana  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Comprehension: Summarize a speaker's purpose and point of view and ask questions concerning the speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject.

Grade: 10
Comprehension: Summarize a speaker's purpose and point of view and ask questions concerning the speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject.

Grade: 11
Organization and Delivery of Oral Communication: Distinguish between and use various forms of logical arguments, including: Inductive arguments (arguments that are highly likely, such as All of these pears are from that basket and all of these pears are ripe, so all of the pears in the basket are ripe) and deductive arguments (arguments that are necessary conclusions based on the evidence, such as If all men are mortal and he is a man, then he is mortal); Syllogisms and analogies (assumptions that if two things are similar in some ways then they are probably similar in others).

Grade: 12
Organization and Delivery of Oral Communication: Distinguish between and use various forms of logical arguments, including: Inductive arguments (arguments that are highly likely, such as All of these pears are from that basket and all of these pears are ripe, so all of the pears in the basket are ripe) and deductive arguments (arguments that are necessary conclusions based on the evidence, such as If all men are mortal and he is a man, then he is mortal); Syllogisms and analogies (assumptions that if two things are similar in some ways then they are probably similar in others).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Evolution: Explain how natural selection leads to organisms that are well suited for survival in particular environments, and discuss how natural selection provides scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Evolution: Trace the relationship between environmental changes and changes in the gene pool, such as genetic drift and isolation of sub-populations.

The Earth: Examine the structure, composition, and function of the Earth's atmosphere. Include the role of living organisms in the cycling of atmospheric gases.

The Earth: Describe the role of photosynthetic plants in changing the Earth's atmosphere.

The Earth: Describe the development and dynamics of climatic changes over time, such as the cycles of glaciation.

The Earth: Demonstrate the possible effects of atmospheric changes brought on by things such as acid rain, smoke, volcanic dust, greenhouse gases, and ozone depletion.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Explain motions, transformations, and locations of materials in the Earth's lithosphere and interior. For example, describe the movement of the plates that make up the crust of the earth and the resulting formation of earthquakes, volcanoes, trenches, and mountains.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Understand and discuss continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and plate tectonics. Include evidence that supports the movement of the plates such as magnetic stripes on the ocean floor, fossil evidence on separate continents, and the continuity of geological features.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Discuss geologic evidence, including fossils and radioactive dating, in relation to the Earth's past.

Explain that the idea, that the Earth might be vastly older than most people believed, made little headway in science until the work of Lyell and Hutton.

Describe that early in the 20th century the German scientist, Alfred Wegener, reintroduced the idea of moving continents, adding such evidence as the underwater shapes of the continents, the similarity of life forms and land forms in corresponding parts of Africa and South America, and the increasing separation of Greenland and Europe. Also know that very few contemporary scientists adopted his theory because Wegener was unable to propose a plausible mechanism for motion.

Explain that the theory of plate tectonics was finally accepted by the scientific community in the 1960s when further evidence had accumulated in support of it. Understand that the theory was seen to provide an explanation for a diverse array of seemingly unrelated phenomena, and there was a scientifically sound physical explanation of how such movement could occur.

Changes in Matter: Show how the predictability of the nuclei decay rate allows radioactivity to be used for estimating the age of materials that contain radioactive substances.

Grade: 10
Evolution: Explain how natural selection leads to organisms that are well suited for survival in particular environments, and discuss how natural selection provides scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Evolution: Trace the relationship between environmental changes and changes in the gene pool, such as genetic drift and isolation of sub-populations.

The Earth: Examine the structure, composition, and function of the Earth's atmosphere. Include the role of living organisms in the cycling of atmospheric gases.

The Earth: Describe the role of photosynthetic plants in changing the Earth's atmosphere.

The Earth: Describe the development and dynamics of climatic changes over time, such as the cycles of glaciation.

The Earth: Demonstrate the possible effects of atmospheric changes brought on by things such as acid rain, smoke, volcanic dust, greenhouse gases, and ozone depletion.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Explain motions, transformations, and locations of materials in the Earth's lithosphere and interior. For example, describe the movement of the plates that make up the crust of the earth and the resulting formation of earthquakes, volcanoes, trenches, and mountains.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Understand and discuss continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and plate tectonics. Include evidence that supports the movement of the plates such as magnetic stripes on the ocean floor, fossil evidence on separate continents, and the continuity of geological features.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Discuss geologic evidence, including fossils and radioactive dating, in relation to the Earth's past.

Explain that the idea, that the Earth might be vastly older than most people believed, made little headway in science until the work of Lyell and Hutton.

Describe that early in the 20th century the German scientist, Alfred Wegener, reintroduced the idea of moving continents, adding such evidence as the underwater shapes of the continents, the similarity of life forms and land forms in corresponding parts of Africa and South America, and the increasing separation of Greenland and Europe. Also know that very few contemporary scientists adopted his theory because Wegener was unable to propose a plausible mechanism for motion.

Explain that the theory of plate tectonics was finally accepted by the scientific community in the 1960s when further evidence had accumulated in support of it. Understand that the theory was seen to provide an explanation for a diverse array of seemingly unrelated phenomena, and there was a scientifically sound physical explanation of how such movement could occur.

Changes in Matter: Show how the predictability of the nuclei decay rate allows radioactivity to be used for estimating the age of materials that contain radioactive substances.

Grade: 11
Evolution: Explain how natural selection leads to organisms that are well suited for survival in particular environments, and discuss how natural selection provides scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Evolution: Trace the relationship between environmental changes and changes in the gene pool, such as genetic drift and isolation of sub-populations.

The Earth: Examine the structure, composition, and function of the Earth's atmosphere. Include the role of living organisms in the cycling of atmospheric gases.

The Earth: Describe the role of photosynthetic plants in changing the Earth's atmosphere.

The Earth: Describe the development and dynamics of climatic changes over time, such as the cycles of glaciation.

The Earth: Demonstrate the possible effects of atmospheric changes brought on by things such as acid rain, smoke, volcanic dust, greenhouse gases, and ozone depletion.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Explain motions, transformations, and locations of materials in the Earth's lithosphere and interior. For example, describe the movement of the plates that make up the crust of the earth and the resulting formation of earthquakes, volcanoes, trenches, and mountains.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Understand and discuss continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and plate tectonics. Include evidence that supports the movement of the plates such as magnetic stripes on the ocean floor, fossil evidence on separate continents, and the continuity of geological features.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Discuss geologic evidence, including fossils and radioactive dating, in relation to the Earth's past.

Explain that the idea, that the Earth might be vastly older than most people believed, made little headway in science until the work of Lyell and Hutton.

Describe that early in the 20th century the German scientist, Alfred Wegener, reintroduced the idea of moving continents, adding such evidence as the underwater shapes of the continents, the similarity of life forms and land forms in corresponding parts of Africa and South America, and the increasing separation of Greenland and Europe. Also know that very few contemporary scientists adopted his theory because Wegener was unable to propose a plausible mechanism for motion.

Explain that the theory of plate tectonics was finally accepted by the scientific community in the 1960s when further evidence had accumulated in support of it. Understand that the theory was seen to provide an explanation for a diverse array of seemingly unrelated phenomena, and there was a scientifically sound physical explanation of how such movement could occur.

Changes in Matter: Show how the predictability of the nuclei decay rate allows radioactivity to be used for estimating the age of materials that contain radioactive substances.

Grade: 12
Evolution: Explain how natural selection leads to organisms that are well suited for survival in particular environments, and discuss how natural selection provides scientific explanation for the history of life on earth as depicted in the fossil record and in the similarities evident within the diversity of existing organisms.

Evolution: Trace the relationship between environmental changes and changes in the gene pool, such as genetic drift and isolation of sub-populations.

The Earth: Examine the structure, composition, and function of the Earth's atmosphere. Include the role of living organisms in the cycling of atmospheric gases.

The Earth: Describe the role of photosynthetic plants in changing the Earth's atmosphere.

The Earth: Describe the development and dynamics of climatic changes over time, such as the cycles of glaciation.

The Earth: Demonstrate the possible effects of atmospheric changes brought on by things such as acid rain, smoke, volcanic dust, greenhouse gases, and ozone depletion.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Explain motions, transformations, and locations of materials in the Earth's lithosphere and interior. For example, describe the movement of the plates that make up the crust of the earth and the resulting formation of earthquakes, volcanoes, trenches, and mountains.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Understand and discuss continental drift, sea-floor spreading, and plate tectonics. Include evidence that supports the movement of the plates such as magnetic stripes on the ocean floor, fossil evidence on separate continents, and the continuity of geological features.

Processes That Shape The Earth: Discuss geologic evidence, including fossils and radioactive dating, in relation to the Earth's past.

Explain that the idea, that the Earth might be vastly older than most people believed, made little headway in science until the work of Lyell and Hutton.

Describe that early in the 20th century the German scientist, Alfred Wegener, reintroduced the idea of moving continents, adding such evidence as the underwater shapes of the continents, the similarity of life forms and land forms in corresponding parts of Africa and South America, and the increasing separation of Greenland and Europe. Also know that very few contemporary scientists adopted his theory because Wegener was unable to propose a plausible mechanism for motion.

Explain that the theory of plate tectonics was finally accepted by the scientific community in the 1960s when further evidence had accumulated in support of it. Understand that the theory was seen to provide an explanation for a diverse array of seemingly unrelated phenomena, and there was a scientifically sound physical explanation of how such movement could occur.

Changes in Matter: Show how the predictability of the nuclei decay rate allows radioactivity to be used for estimating the age of materials that contain radioactive substances.

Kansas  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The students will understand that the theory of evolution is both the history of descent, with modifications of different lineages of organisms from common ancestors, and the ongoing adaptation of organisms to environmental challenges and changes (modified from Futuyma, et al., 1999).

The students will understand that biologists use evolution theory to explain the Earth's present day biodiversity- the number, variety and variability of organisms.

The students will understand that biologists recognize that the primary mechanisms of evolution are natural selection and genetic drift.

The students will understand the sources and value of variation.

The students will understand that evolution by natural selection is a broad, unifying theoretical framework in biology.

The students will understand that convection circulation in the mantle is driven by the outward transfer of the earth's internal heat.

The students will understand movable continental and oceanic plates make up the earth's surface; the hot, convecting mantle is the energy source for plate movement.

Energy from the sun heats the oceans and the atmosphere, and affects oceanic and atmospheric circulation.

The student understands the processes of the carbon, rock, and water cycles.

The student understands the composition and structure of earth's atmosphere.

The student will understand the geologic time scale and how it relates to the history of the earth.

The student will understand rock sequences, fossils, and radioactive decay and how they are used to estimate the time rocks were formed.

The student will understand Earth changes as short-term (during a human's lifetime), such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and as long-term (over a geological time scale), such as mountain building and plate movements.

The student will understand the dramatic changes in the earth's atmosphere (i.e. introduction of O2) which were affected by the emergence of life on earth.

Grade: 10
The students will understand that the theory of evolution is both the history of descent, with modifications of different lineages of organisms from common ancestors, and the ongoing adaptation of organisms to environmental challenges and changes (modified from Futuyma, et al., 1999).

The students will understand that biologists use evolution theory to explain the Earth's present day biodiversity- the number, variety and variability of organisms.

The students will understand that biologists recognize that the primary mechanisms of evolution are natural selection and genetic drift.

The students will understand the sources and value of variation.

The students will understand that evolution by natural selection is a broad, unifying theoretical framework in biology.

The students will understand that convection circulation in the mantle is driven by the outward transfer of the earth's internal heat.

The students will understand movable continental and oceanic plates make up the earth's surface; the hot, convecting mantle is the energy source for plate movement.

Energy from the sun heats the oceans and the atmosphere, and affects oceanic and atmospheric circulation.

The student understands the processes of the carbon, rock, and water cycles.

The student understands the composition and structure of earth's atmosphere.

The student will understand the geologic time scale and how it relates to the history of the earth.

The student will understand rock sequences, fossils, and radioactive decay and how they are used to estimate the time rocks were formed.

The student will understand Earth changes as short-term (during a human's lifetime), such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and as long-term (over a geological time scale), such as mountain building and plate movements.

The student will understand the dramatic changes in the earth's atmosphere (i.e. introduction of O2) which were affected by the emergence of life on earth.

Grade: 11
The students will understand that the theory of evolution is both the history of descent, with modifications of different lineages of organisms from common ancestors, and the ongoing adaptation of organisms to environmental challenges and changes (modified from Futuyma, et al., 1999).

The students will understand that biologists use evolution theory to explain the Earth's present day biodiversity- the number, variety and variability of organisms.

The students will understand that biologists recognize that the primary mechanisms of evolution are natural selection and genetic drift.

The students will understand the sources and value of variation.

The students will understand that evolution by natural selection is a broad, unifying theoretical framework in biology.

The students will understand that convection circulation in the mantle is driven by the outward transfer of the earth's internal heat.

The students will understand movable continental and oceanic plates make up the earth's surface; the hot, convecting mantle is the energy source for plate movement.

Energy from the sun heats the oceans and the atmosphere, and affects oceanic and atmospheric circulation.

The student understands the processes of the carbon, rock, and water cycles.

The student understands the composition and structure of earth's atmosphere.

The student will understand the geologic time scale and how it relates to the history of the earth.

The student will understand rock sequences, fossils, and radioactive decay and how they are used to estimate the time rocks were formed.

The student will understand Earth changes as short-term (during a human's lifetime), such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and as long-term (over a geological time scale), such as mountain building and plate movements.

The student will understand the dramatic changes in the earth's atmosphere (i.e. introduction of O2) which were affected by the emergence of life on earth.

Grade: 12
The students will understand that the theory of evolution is both the history of descent, with modifications of different lineages of organisms from common ancestors, and the ongoing adaptation of organisms to environmental challenges and changes (modified from Futuyma, et al., 1999).

The students will understand that biologists use evolution theory to explain the Earth's present day biodiversity- the number, variety and variability of organisms.

The students will understand that biologists recognize that the primary mechanisms of evolution are natural selection and genetic drift.

The students will understand the sources and value of variation.

The students will understand that evolution by natural selection is a broad, unifying theoretical framework in biology.

The students will understand that convection circulation in the mantle is driven by the outward transfer of the earth's internal heat.

The students will understand movable continental and oceanic plates make up the earth's surface; the hot, convecting mantle is the energy source for plate movement.

Energy from the sun heats the oceans and the atmosphere, and affects oceanic and atmospheric circulation.

The student understands the processes of the carbon, rock, and water cycles.

The student understands the composition and structure of earth's atmosphere.

The student will understand the geologic time scale and how it relates to the history of the earth.

The student will understand rock sequences, fossils, and radioactive decay and how they are used to estimate the time rocks were formed.

The student will understand Earth changes as short-term (during a human's lifetime), such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and as long-term (over a geological time scale), such as mountain building and plate movements.

The student will understand the dramatic changes in the earth's atmosphere (i.e. introduction of O2) which were affected by the emergence of life on earth.

Kentucky  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The outward transfer of Earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle. This causes the crustal plates to move on the face of the Earth.

Techniques used to estimate geological time include using radioactive dating, observing rock sequences, and comparing fossils to correlate the rock sequences at various locations.

Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system. Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions can be observed on a human time scale, but many processes, such as mountain building and plate movements, take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Evidence for one-celled forms of life, the bacteria, extends back more than 3.5 billion years. The changes in life over time caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Grade: 10
The outward transfer of Earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle. This causes the crustal plates to move on the face of the Earth.

Techniques used to estimate geological time include using radioactive dating, observing rock sequences, and comparing fossils to correlate the rock sequences at various locations.

Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system. Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions can be observed on a human time scale, but many processes, such as mountain building and plate movements, take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Evidence for one-celled forms of life, the bacteria, extends back more than 3.5 billion years. The changes in life over time caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Grade: 11
The outward transfer of Earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle. This causes the crustal plates to move on the face of the Earth.

Techniques used to estimate geological time include using radioactive dating, observing rock sequences, and comparing fossils to correlate the rock sequences at various locations.

Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system. Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions can be observed on a human time scale, but many processes, such as mountain building and plate movements, take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Evidence for one-celled forms of life, the bacteria, extends back more than 3.5 billion years. The changes in life over time caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Grade: 12
The outward transfer of Earth's internal heat drives convection circulation in the mantle. This causes the crustal plates to move on the face of the Earth.

Techniques used to estimate geological time include using radioactive dating, observing rock sequences, and comparing fossils to correlate the rock sequences at various locations.

Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system. Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions can be observed on a human time scale, but many processes, such as mountain building and plate movements, take place over hundreds of millions of years.

Evidence for one-celled forms of life, the bacteria, extends back more than 3.5 billion years. The changes in life over time caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Louisiana  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to oral instructions and presentations, speeches, discussions, and carry out procedures, including: taking accurate notes; writing summaries or responses; forming groups. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring messages for clarity; selecting and organizing essential information; noting cues such as changes in pace; generating and asking questions concerning a speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject. (ELA-4-H4)

Grade: 10
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex procedures, including: taking accurate notes; writing summaries or responses; forming groups. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring message for clarity; selecting and organizing essential information; noting cues such as changes in pace; generating and asking questions concerning a speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject. (ELA-4-H4)

Grade: 11
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex procedures, including: reading and questioning; writing responses; forming groups; taking accurate, detailed notes. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring messages for clarity; selecting and organizing information; noting cues such as changes in pace. (ELA-4-H4)

Grade: 12
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex procedures, including: reading and questioning; writing responses; forming groups; taking accurate, detailed notes. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring messages for clarity; selecting and organizing information; noting cues such as changes in pace. (ELA-4-H4)

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Energy in the Earth System: modeling the transfer of the Earth's internal heat by way of convection currents in the mantle which powers the movement of the lithospheric plates. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: illustrating how stable chemical atoms or elements are recycled through the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: demonstrating Earth's internal and external energy sources as forces in moving chemical atoms or elements. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining the formation of the solar system from a nebular cloud of dust and gas. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: examining fossil evidence as it relates to the evolution of life and the resulting changes in the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining that natural processes and changes in the Earth system may take place in a matter of seconds or develop over billions of years. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Grade: 10
Grade Level Expectation: Biology: Biological Evolution: Analyze evidence on biological evolution, utilizing descriptions of existing investigations, computer models, and fossil records (LS-H-C1)

Energy in the Earth System: modeling the transfer of the Earth's internal heat by way of convection currents in the mantle which powers the movement of the lithospheric plates. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: illustrating how stable chemical atoms or elements are recycled through the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: demonstrating Earth's internal and external energy sources as forces in moving chemical atoms or elements. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining the formation of the solar system from a nebular cloud of dust and gas. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: examining fossil evidence as it relates to the evolution of life and the resulting changes in the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining that natural processes and changes in the Earth system may take place in a matter of seconds or develop over billions of years. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Grade: 11
Energy in the Earth System: modeling the transfer of the Earth's internal heat by way of convection currents in the mantle which powers the movement of the lithospheric plates. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: illustrating how stable chemical atoms or elements are recycled through the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: demonstrating Earth's internal and external energy sources as forces in moving chemical atoms or elements. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining the formation of the solar system from a nebular cloud of dust and gas. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: examining fossil evidence as it relates to the evolution of life and the resulting changes in the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining that natural processes and changes in the Earth system may take place in a matter of seconds or develop over billions of years. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Trace the flow of heat energy through the processes in the water cycle (ESS-H-A1)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Explain why weather only occurs in the tropospheric layer of Earth's atmosphere (ESS-H-A5)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Compare the structure, composition, and function of the layers of Earth's atmosphere (ESS-H-A6)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Describe the processes that drive lithospheric plate movements (i.e., radioactive decay, friction, convection) (ESS-H-A7) (ESS-H-A3) (ESS-H-A4)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Relate lithospheric plate movements to the occurrences of earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridge systems, and off-shore trenches found on Earth (ESS-H-A7)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Determine the relative ages of rock layers in a geologic profile or cross section (ESS-H-C2)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Use data from radioactive dating techniques to estimate the age of earth materials (ESS-H-C2)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Use fossil records to explain changes in the concentration of atmospheric oxygen over time (ESS-H-C4)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Analyze data related to a variety of natural processes to determine the time frame of the changes involved (e.g., formation of sedimentary rock layers, deposition of ash layers, fossilization of plant or animal species) (ESS-H-C5)

Grade: 12
Energy in the Earth System: modeling the transfer of the Earth's internal heat by way of convection currents in the mantle which powers the movement of the lithospheric plates. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: illustrating how stable chemical atoms or elements are recycled through the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Geochemical Cycles: demonstrating Earth's internal and external energy sources as forces in moving chemical atoms or elements. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining the formation of the solar system from a nebular cloud of dust and gas. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: examining fossil evidence as it relates to the evolution of life and the resulting changes in the amount of oxygen in the atmosphere. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: explaining that natural processes and changes in the Earth system may take place in a matter of seconds or develop over billions of years. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Trace the flow of heat energy through the processes in the water cycle (ESS-H-A1)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Explain why weather only occurs in the tropospheric layer of Earth's atmosphere (ESS-H-A5)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Compare the structure, composition, and function of the layers of Earth's atmosphere (ESS-H-A6)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Describe the processes that drive lithospheric plate movements (i.e., radioactive decay, friction, convection) (ESS-H-A7) (ESS-H-A3) (ESS-H-A4)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: Energy in Earth's System: Relate lithospheric plate movements to the occurrences of earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridge systems, and off-shore trenches found on Earth (ESS-H-A7)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Determine the relative ages of rock layers in a geologic profile or cross section (ESS-H-C2)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Use data from radioactive dating techniques to estimate the age of earth materials (ESS-H-C2)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Use fossil records to explain changes in the concentration of atmospheric oxygen over time (ESS-H-C4)

Grade Level Expectation: Earth Science: The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Analyze data related to a variety of natural processes to determine the time frame of the changes involved (e.g., formation of sedimentary rock layers, deposition of ash layers, fossilization of plant or animal species) (ESS-H-C5)

Massachusetts  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Grade: 10
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Grade: 11
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Grade: 12
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Earth Processes and Cycles: Explain the nitrogen and carbon cycles and their roles in the improvement of soils for agriculture.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the evolution of the atmosphere.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe how the oceans store carbon dioxide as dissolved HCO3 and CaCO3 precipitate.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the rock cycle, and the processes that are responsible for the formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Compare the physical properties of these rock types.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the absolute and relative dating methods used to measure geologic time, e.g., index fossils, radioactive dating, law of superposition, and cross-cutting relationships.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the evolution of the solid earth in terms of the major geologic eras.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Explain how paleomagnetic patterns, preserved in rocks, provide evidence of the earth's magnetic field over geologic time.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Trace the development of a lithospheric plate from its growing margin at a divergent boundary (mid-ocean ridge) to its destructive margin at a convergent boundary (subduction zone). Explain the relationship between convection currents and the motion of the lithospheric plates.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Relate earthquakes, volcanic activity, mountain building, and tectonic uplift to plate movements.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Relate the effects of sudden seafloor movements to the generation of tsunamis.

Evolution and Biodiversity: Explain how the fossil record, comparative anatomy, and other evidence support the theory of evolution.

Grade: 10
Earth Processes and Cycles: Explain the nitrogen and carbon cycles and their roles in the improvement of soils for agriculture.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the evolution of the atmosphere.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe how the oceans store carbon dioxide as dissolved HCO3 and CaCO3 precipitate.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the rock cycle, and the processes that are responsible for the formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Compare the physical properties of these rock types.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the absolute and relative dating methods used to measure geologic time, e.g., index fossils, radioactive dating, law of superposition, and cross-cutting relationships.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Describe the evolution of the solid earth in terms of the major geologic eras.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Explain how paleomagnetic patterns, preserved in rocks, provide evidence of the earth's magnetic field over geologic time.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Trace the development of a lithospheric plate from its growing margin at a divergent boundary (mid-ocean ridge) to its destructive margin at a convergent boundary (subduction zone). Explain the relationship between convection currents and the motion of the lithospheric plates.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Relate earthquakes, volcanic activity, mountain building, and tectonic uplift to plate movements.

Earth Processes and Cycles: Relate the effects of sudden seafloor movements to the generation of tsunamis.

Evolution and Biodiversity: Explain how the fossil record, comparative anatomy, and other evidence support the theory of evolution.

Maryland  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student will describe current efforts and technologies used to study the atmosphere, land, and oceans of Earth (remote sensing from space, undersea exploration, seismology, weather data collection).

The student will explain the dynamic activity of the earth (plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, faulting, earthquakes, volcanoes).

The student will research the change in belief in the age of the earth (fossil record, rock layers, radioactive dating, Big Bang theory).

The student will create a geologic time scale including eras, periods, and epochs (analogies, ratios, scale drawings, powers of ten).

The student will describe the structure of Earth (inner core, outer core, mantle, lithosphere - crust and upper mantle).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, radiation from space and from within Earth).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, and radiation) from space and from within Earth.

The student will describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and explain possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

The student will relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the presence of single-celled life forms.

The student will analyze how the transfer of energy between atmosphere, land masses and oceans results in areas of different temperatures and densities that produce weather patterns and establish climate zones around the earth.

Grade: 10
The student will describe current efforts and technologies used to study the atmosphere, land, and oceans of Earth (remote sensing from space, undersea exploration, seismology, weather data collection).

The student will explain the dynamic activity of the earth (plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, faulting, earthquakes, volcanoes).

The student will research the change in belief in the age of the earth (fossil record, rock layers, radioactive dating, Big Bang theory).

The student will create a geologic time scale including eras, periods, and epochs (analogies, ratios, scale drawings, powers of ten).

The student will describe the structure of Earth (inner core, outer core, mantle, lithosphere - crust and upper mantle).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, radiation from space and from within Earth).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, and radiation) from space and from within Earth.

The student will describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and explain possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

The student will relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the presence of single-celled life forms.

The student will analyze how the transfer of energy between atmosphere, land masses and oceans results in areas of different temperatures and densities that produce weather patterns and establish climate zones around the earth.

Grade: 11
The student will describe current efforts and technologies used to study the atmosphere, land, and oceans of Earth (remote sensing from space, undersea exploration, seismology, weather data collection).

The student will explain the dynamic activity of the earth (plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, faulting, earthquakes, volcanoes).

The student will research the change in belief in the age of the earth (fossil record, rock layers, radioactive dating, Big Bang theory).

The student will create a geologic time scale including eras, periods, and epochs (analogies, ratios, scale drawings, powers of ten).

The student will describe the structure of Earth (inner core, outer core, mantle, lithosphere - crust and upper mantle).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, radiation from space and from within Earth).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, and radiation) from space and from within Earth.

The student will describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and explain possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

The student will relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the presence of single-celled life forms.

The student will analyze how the transfer of energy between atmosphere, land masses and oceans results in areas of different temperatures and densities that produce weather patterns and establish climate zones around the earth.

Grade: 12
The student will describe current efforts and technologies used to study the atmosphere, land, and oceans of Earth (remote sensing from space, undersea exploration, seismology, weather data collection).

The student will explain the dynamic activity of the earth (plate tectonics, sea floor spreading, faulting, earthquakes, volcanoes).

The student will research the change in belief in the age of the earth (fossil record, rock layers, radioactive dating, Big Bang theory).

The student will create a geologic time scale including eras, periods, and epochs (analogies, ratios, scale drawings, powers of ten).

The student will describe the structure of Earth (inner core, outer core, mantle, lithosphere - crust and upper mantle).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, radiation from space and from within Earth).

The student will describe heat transfer systems affecting the atmosphere, land, and oceans (convection, conduction, and radiation) from space and from within Earth.

The student will describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and explain possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

The student will relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the presence of single-celled life forms.

The student will analyze how the transfer of energy between atmosphere, land masses and oceans results in areas of different temperatures and densities that produce weather patterns and establish climate zones around the earth.

Maine  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will be able to explain both the evidence used to develop the geologic time scale and why an awareness of geologic time is important to an understanding of the process of change in the universe as well as on earth.

Students will be able to describe the impact of plate movement and erosion on the rock cycle.

Students will be able to describe ways that scientists measure long periods of time and determine the age of very old objects.

Students will be able to demonstrate how rocks and minerals are used to determine geologic history.

Students will be able to analyze the changes in continental position and the evidence that supports the concept of tectonic plates.

Grade: 10
Students will be able to explain both the evidence used to develop the geologic time scale and why an awareness of geologic time is important to an understanding of the process of change in the universe as well as on earth.

Students will be able to describe the impact of plate movement and erosion on the rock cycle.

Students will be able to describe ways that scientists measure long periods of time and determine the age of very old objects.

Students will be able to demonstrate how rocks and minerals are used to determine geologic history.

Students will be able to analyze the changes in continental position and the evidence that supports the concept of tectonic plates.

Grade: 11
Students will be able to explain both the evidence used to develop the geologic time scale and why an awareness of geologic time is important to an understanding of the process of change in the universe as well as on earth.

Students will be able to describe the impact of plate movement and erosion on the rock cycle.

Students will be able to describe ways that scientists measure long periods of time and determine the age of very old objects.

Students will be able to demonstrate how rocks and minerals are used to determine geologic history.

Students will be able to analyze the changes in continental position and the evidence that supports the concept of tectonic plates.

Grade: 12
Students will be able to explain both the evidence used to develop the geologic time scale and why an awareness of geologic time is important to an understanding of the process of change in the universe as well as on earth.

Students will be able to describe the impact of plate movement and erosion on the rock cycle.

Students will be able to describe ways that scientists measure long periods of time and determine the age of very old objects.

Students will be able to demonstrate how rocks and minerals are used to determine geologic history.

Students will be able to analyze the changes in continental position and the evidence that supports the concept of tectonic plates.

Michigan  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Grade: 10
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Grade: 11
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Grade: 12
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe how carbon and soil nutrients cycle through selected ecosystems.

Explain the surface features of the Great Lakes region using Ice Age theory.

Use the plate tectonics theory to explain features of the earth's surface and geological phenomena and describe evidence for the plate tectonics theory.

Explain how interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere create climates and how climates change over time.

Describe patterns of air movement in the atmosphere and how they affect weather conditions.

Explain the impact of human activities on the atmosphere and explain ways that individuals and society can reduce pollution.

Grade: 10
Describe how carbon and soil nutrients cycle through selected ecosystems.

Explain the surface features of the Great Lakes region using Ice Age theory.

Use the plate tectonics theory to explain features of the earth's surface and geological phenomena and describe evidence for the plate tectonics theory.

Explain how interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere create climates and how climates change over time.

Describe patterns of air movement in the atmosphere and how they affect weather conditions.

Explain the impact of human activities on the atmosphere and explain ways that individuals and society can reduce pollution.

Grade: 11
Describe how carbon and soil nutrients cycle through selected ecosystems.

Explain the surface features of the Great Lakes region using Ice Age theory.

Use the plate tectonics theory to explain features of the earth's surface and geological phenomena and describe evidence for the plate tectonics theory.

Explain how interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere create climates and how climates change over time.

Describe patterns of air movement in the atmosphere and how they affect weather conditions.

Explain the impact of human activities on the atmosphere and explain ways that individuals and society can reduce pollution.

Grade: 12
Describe how carbon and soil nutrients cycle through selected ecosystems.

Explain the surface features of the Great Lakes region using Ice Age theory.

Use the plate tectonics theory to explain features of the earth's surface and geological phenomena and describe evidence for the plate tectonics theory.

Explain how interactions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere create climates and how climates change over time.

Describe patterns of air movement in the atmosphere and how they affect weather conditions.

Explain the impact of human activities on the atmosphere and explain ways that individuals and society can reduce pollution.

Minnesota  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Grade: 10
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Grade: 11
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Grade: 12
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student will illustrate how biological processes have played significant roles in determining the character of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere over time.

The student will use the theory of plate tectonics to analyze relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mountains fossil deposits, rock layers and ocean features.

The student will use evidence found in fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating and globally gathered data to explain how Earth has changed over short and long periods of time.

The student will trace the cyclical movement of carbon and water through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere.

The student will compare and contrast the environmental parameters that make life possible on Earth with conditions found on the other planets of our solar system.

The student will explain the relationship between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem in terms of the cycling of water, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen.

Grade: 10
The student will illustrate how biological processes have played significant roles in determining the character of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere over time.

The student will use the theory of plate tectonics to analyze relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mountains fossil deposits, rock layers and ocean features.

The student will use evidence found in fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating and globally gathered data to explain how Earth has changed over short and long periods of time.

The student will trace the cyclical movement of carbon and water through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere.

The student will compare and contrast the environmental parameters that make life possible on Earth with conditions found on the other planets of our solar system.

The student will explain the relationship between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem in terms of the cycling of water, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen.

Grade: 11
The student will illustrate how biological processes have played significant roles in determining the character of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere over time.

The student will use the theory of plate tectonics to analyze relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mountains fossil deposits, rock layers and ocean features.

The student will use evidence found in fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating and globally gathered data to explain how Earth has changed over short and long periods of time.

The student will trace the cyclical movement of carbon and water through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere.

The student will compare and contrast the environmental parameters that make life possible on Earth with conditions found on the other planets of our solar system.

The student will explain the relationship between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem in terms of the cycling of water, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen.

Grade: 12
The student will illustrate how biological processes have played significant roles in determining the character of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere over time.

The student will use the theory of plate tectonics to analyze relationships among earthquakes, volcanoes, mountains fossil deposits, rock layers and ocean features.

The student will use evidence found in fossils, rock layers, ice cores, radiometric dating and globally gathered data to explain how Earth has changed over short and long periods of time.

The student will trace the cyclical movement of carbon and water through the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere.

The student will compare and contrast the environmental parameters that make life possible on Earth with conditions found on the other planets of our solar system.

The student will explain the relationship between abiotic and biotic components of an ecosystem in terms of the cycling of water, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen.

Missouri  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Grade: 10
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Grade: 11
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Grade: 12
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate information on several natural disasters and predict possible reactions of plants, animals, and humans.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to identify the theories associated with major geological events and present the information in the form of a time line.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to conduct laboratory experiments looking at artificial selection and apply the understanding acquired from these experiments to natural systems in which selection occurs because of environmental conditions.

Grade: 10
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate information on several natural disasters and predict possible reactions of plants, animals, and humans.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to identify the theories associated with major geological events and present the information in the form of a time line.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to conduct laboratory experiments looking at artificial selection and apply the understanding acquired from these experiments to natural systems in which selection occurs because of environmental conditions.

Grade: 11
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate information on several natural disasters and predict possible reactions of plants, animals, and humans.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to identify the theories associated with major geological events and present the information in the form of a time line.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to conduct laboratory experiments looking at artificial selection and apply the understanding acquired from these experiments to natural systems in which selection occurs because of environmental conditions.

Grade: 12
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate information on several natural disasters and predict possible reactions of plants, animals, and humans.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to identify the theories associated with major geological events and present the information in the form of a time line.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to conduct laboratory experiments looking at artificial selection and apply the understanding acquired from these experiments to natural systems in which selection occurs because of environmental conditions.

Mississippi  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Grade: 10
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Grade: 11
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Grade: 12
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Define the internal processes that shape the earth features.

Research the origins of the earth.

Investigate layering as a process of determining the earth origin.

Research the Greenhouse Effect as it relates to the atmosphere.

Research the circulation of the atmosphere.

Define terminology associated with plate tectonics.

Identify the layers and sublayers of the atmosphere and of the earth.

Explore the theories of plate development and continental drift.

Explain the process that power crustal movements.

Locate areas of crustal movement around the world.

Explain the processes that create earthquakes and volcanoes.

Compare and contrast the relative and absolute age of the Earth (radiometric dating, index of fossil layers, etc.).

Describe the differences among eras, periods, and epochs as recorded in the geological time scale.

Explore the connections among geological history, landforms, and presence of minerals.

Grade: 10
Define the internal processes that shape the earth features.

Research the origins of the earth.

Investigate layering as a process of determining the earth origin.

Research the Greenhouse Effect as it relates to the atmosphere.

Research the circulation of the atmosphere.

Define terminology associated with plate tectonics.

Identify the layers and sublayers of the atmosphere and of the earth.

Explore the theories of plate development and continental drift.

Explain the process that power crustal movements.

Locate areas of crustal movement around the world.

Explain the processes that create earthquakes and volcanoes.

Compare and contrast the relative and absolute age of the Earth (radiometric dating, index of fossil layers, etc.).

Describe the differences among eras, periods, and epochs as recorded in the geological time scale.

Explore the connections among geological history, landforms, and presence of minerals.

Grade: 11
Define the internal processes that shape the earth features.

Research the origins of the earth.

Investigate layering as a process of determining the earth origin.

Research the Greenhouse Effect as it relates to the atmosphere.

Research the circulation of the atmosphere.

Define terminology associated with plate tectonics.

Identify the layers and sublayers of the atmosphere and of the earth.

Explore the theories of plate development and continental drift.

Explain the process that power crustal movements.

Locate areas of crustal movement around the world.

Explain the processes that create earthquakes and volcanoes.

Compare and contrast the relative and absolute age of the Earth (radiometric dating, index of fossil layers, etc.).

Describe the differences among eras, periods, and epochs as recorded in the geological time scale.

Explore the connections among geological history, landforms, and presence of minerals.

Grade: 12
Define the internal processes that shape the earth features.

Research the origins of the earth.

Investigate layering as a process of determining the earth origin.

Research the Greenhouse Effect as it relates to the atmosphere.

Research the circulation of the atmosphere.

Define terminology associated with plate tectonics.

Identify the layers and sublayers of the atmosphere and of the earth.

Explore the theories of plate development and continental drift.

Explain the process that power crustal movements.

Locate areas of crustal movement around the world.

Explain the processes that create earthquakes and volcanoes.

Compare and contrast the relative and absolute age of the Earth (radiometric dating, index of fossil layers, etc.).

Describe the differences among eras, periods, and epochs as recorded in the geological time scale.

Explore the connections among geological history, landforms, and presence of minerals.

Montana  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Grade: 10
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Grade: 11
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Grade: 12
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the inner relationship between earthquakes, volcanoes, and sea floor spreading.

Students will explain the impact of terrestrial, Solar, oceanic, and atmosphere conditions on global climatic patterns.

Grade: 10
Students will use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the inner relationship between earthquakes, volcanoes, and sea floor spreading.

Students will explain the impact of terrestrial, Solar, oceanic, and atmosphere conditions on global climatic patterns.

Grade: 11
Students will use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the inner relationship between earthquakes, volcanoes, and sea floor spreading.

Students will explain the impact of terrestrial, Solar, oceanic, and atmosphere conditions on global climatic patterns.

Grade: 12
Students will use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the inner relationship between earthquakes, volcanoes, and sea floor spreading.

Students will explain the impact of terrestrial, Solar, oceanic, and atmosphere conditions on global climatic patterns.

North Carolina  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Analyze the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics.

Investigate and analyze the processes responsible for the rock cycle: analyze the origin, texture and mineral composition of rocks; trace the path of elements through the rock cycle; relate rock formation to plate tectonics; identify forms of energy that drive the rock cycle; analyze the relationship between the rock cycle and processes in the atmosphere and hydrosphere.

Assess evidence to interpret the order and impact of events in the geologic past: relative and absolute dating techniques; statistical models of radioactive decay; fossil evidence of past life; uniformitarianism; stratigraphic principles; divisions of geologic time; origin of the earth system; origin of life.

Investigate the atmosphere: atmospheric history: origin and evolution; composition; structure; atmospheric dynamics: weather and climate.

Grade: 10
Analyze the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics.

Investigate and analyze the processes responsible for the rock cycle: analyze the origin, texture and mineral composition of rocks; trace the path of elements through the rock cycle; relate rock formation to plate tectonics; identify forms of energy that drive the rock cycle; analyze the relationship between the rock cycle and processes in the atmosphere and hydrosphere.

Assess evidence to interpret the order and impact of events in the geologic past: relative and absolute dating techniques; statistical models of radioactive decay; fossil evidence of past life; uniformitarianism; stratigraphic principles; divisions of geologic time; origin of the earth system; origin of life.

Investigate the atmosphere: atmospheric history: origin and evolution; composition; structure; atmospheric dynamics: weather and climate.

Grade: 11
Analyze the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics.

Investigate and analyze the processes responsible for the rock cycle: analyze the origin, texture and mineral composition of rocks; trace the path of elements through the rock cycle; relate rock formation to plate tectonics; identify forms of energy that drive the rock cycle; analyze the relationship between the rock cycle and processes in the atmosphere and hydrosphere.

Assess evidence to interpret the order and impact of events in the geologic past: relative and absolute dating techniques; statistical models of radioactive decay; fossil evidence of past life; uniformitarianism; stratigraphic principles; divisions of geologic time; origin of the earth system; origin of life.

Investigate the atmosphere: atmospheric history: origin and evolution; composition; structure; atmospheric dynamics: weather and climate.

Grade: 12
Analyze the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics.

Investigate and analyze the processes responsible for the rock cycle: analyze the origin, texture and mineral composition of rocks; trace the path of elements through the rock cycle; relate rock formation to plate tectonics; identify forms of energy that drive the rock cycle; analyze the relationship between the rock cycle and processes in the atmosphere and hydrosphere.

Assess evidence to interpret the order and impact of events in the geologic past: relative and absolute dating techniques; statistical models of radioactive decay; fossil evidence of past life; uniformitarianism; stratigraphic principles; divisions of geologic time; origin of the earth system; origin of life.

Investigate the atmosphere: atmospheric history: origin and evolution; composition; structure; atmospheric dynamics: weather and climate.

North Dakota  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Conversation, Group Discussion, and Oral Presentation: Use critical listening skills; i.e., reflection

Grade: 11
Conversation, Group Discussion, and Oral Presentation: Adapt to a variety of speaking and listening situations such as formal presentations, oral interpretations, and group discussions

Grade: 12
Conversation, Group Discussion, and Oral Presentation: Use critical listening responses such as refutation and commentary, to critique the accuracy of messages

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Understand the origin and evolution of the earth system.

Understand the interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

Grade: 10
Understand the origin and evolution of the earth system.

Understand the interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

Grade: 11
Understand the origin and evolution of the earth system.

Understand the interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

Grade: 12
Understand the origin and evolution of the earth system.

Understand the interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere.

Nebraska  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Investigate and diagram how elements and compounds on earth move among reservoirs in the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms as part of geochemical cycles.

Contrast the early earth with the planet we live on today.

Investigate and estimate geologic time by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Predict when rocks were formed by using known decay rates of radioactive isotopes in rocks.

Grade: 10
Investigate and diagram how elements and compounds on earth move among reservoirs in the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms as part of geochemical cycles.

Contrast the early earth with the planet we live on today.

Investigate and estimate geologic time by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Predict when rocks were formed by using known decay rates of radioactive isotopes in rocks.

Grade: 11
Investigate and diagram how elements and compounds on earth move among reservoirs in the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms as part of geochemical cycles.

Contrast the early earth with the planet we live on today.

Investigate and estimate geologic time by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Predict when rocks were formed by using known decay rates of radioactive isotopes in rocks.

Grade: 12
Investigate and diagram how elements and compounds on earth move among reservoirs in the solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms as part of geochemical cycles.

Contrast the early earth with the planet we live on today.

Investigate and estimate geologic time by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Predict when rocks were formed by using known decay rates of radioactive isotopes in rocks.

New Hampshire  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Grade: 10
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Grade: 11
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Grade: 12
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will be able to establish a correlation between different locations using rock and fossil evidence.

Students will be able to identify the composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere.

Students will be able to demonstrate how living things alter the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

Students will be able to describe the relationship of plate tectonics to earthquakes and volcanism.

Grade: 10
Students will be able to establish a correlation between different locations using rock and fossil evidence.

Students will be able to identify the composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere.

Students will be able to demonstrate how living things alter the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

Students will be able to describe the relationship of plate tectonics to earthquakes and volcanism.

Grade: 11
Students will be able to establish a correlation between different locations using rock and fossil evidence.

Students will be able to identify the composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere.

Students will be able to demonstrate how living things alter the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

Students will be able to describe the relationship of plate tectonics to earthquakes and volcanism.

Grade: 12
Students will be able to establish a correlation between different locations using rock and fossil evidence.

Students will be able to identify the composition and physical characteristics of the atmosphere.

Students will be able to demonstrate how living things alter the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

Students will be able to describe the relationship of plate tectonics to earthquakes and volcanism.

New Jersey  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Grade: 10
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Grade: 11
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Grade: 12
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Earth's Properties and Materials: Explain the interrelationship of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and the atmosphere.

Atmosphere and Water: Describe how weather (in the short term) and climate (in the long term) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the relationship among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Know that Earth is a system in which chemical elements exist in fixed amounts and move through the solid Earth, oceans, atmosphere, and living things as part of geochemical cycles.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Recognize that the evolution of life on Earth has changed the composition of Earth's atmosphere through time.

How We Study the Earth: Analyze the evidence produced by a variety of techniques that is used to understand changes in the Earth that have occurred over time: topography, fossils, Rock stratification, ice cores, radiometric data.

Galaxies and Universe: Cite evidence to describe the scientific theory of the origin of the universe and the current explanations of its evolution.

Grade: 10
Earth's Properties and Materials: Explain the interrelationship of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and the atmosphere.

Atmosphere and Water: Describe how weather (in the short term) and climate (in the long term) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the relationship among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Know that Earth is a system in which chemical elements exist in fixed amounts and move through the solid Earth, oceans, atmosphere, and living things as part of geochemical cycles.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Recognize that the evolution of life on Earth has changed the composition of Earth's atmosphere through time.

How We Study the Earth: Analyze the evidence produced by a variety of techniques that is used to understand changes in the Earth that have occurred over time: topography, fossils, Rock stratification, ice cores, radiometric data.

Galaxies and Universe: Cite evidence to describe the scientific theory of the origin of the universe and the current explanations of its evolution.

Grade: 11
Earth's Properties and Materials: Explain the interrelationship of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and the atmosphere.

Atmosphere and Water: Describe how weather (in the short term) and climate (in the long term) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the relationship among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Know that Earth is a system in which chemical elements exist in fixed amounts and move through the solid Earth, oceans, atmosphere, and living things as part of geochemical cycles.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Recognize that the evolution of life on Earth has changed the composition of Earth's atmosphere through time.

How We Study the Earth: Analyze the evidence produced by a variety of techniques that is used to understand changes in the Earth that have occurred over time: topography, fossils, Rock stratification, ice cores, radiometric data.

Galaxies and Universe: Cite evidence to describe the scientific theory of the origin of the universe and the current explanations of its evolution.

Grade: 12
Earth's Properties and Materials: Explain the interrelationship of the geosphere, hydrosphere, and the atmosphere.

Atmosphere and Water: Describe how weather (in the short term) and climate (in the long term) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Use the theory of plate tectonics to explain the relationship among earthquakes, volcanoes, mid-ocean ridges, and deep-sea trenches.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Know that Earth is a system in which chemical elements exist in fixed amounts and move through the solid Earth, oceans, atmosphere, and living things as part of geochemical cycles.

Processes that Shape the Earth: Recognize that the evolution of life on Earth has changed the composition of Earth's atmosphere through time.

How We Study the Earth: Analyze the evidence produced by a variety of techniques that is used to understand changes in the Earth that have occurred over time: topography, fossils, Rock stratification, ice cores, radiometric data.

Galaxies and Universe: Cite evidence to describe the scientific theory of the origin of the universe and the current explanations of its evolution.

New Mexico  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the characteristics and the evolution of Earth in terms of the geosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Recognize that radiometric data indicate that Earth is at least 4 billion years old and that Earth has changed during that period.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the internal structure of Earth (e.g., core, mantle, crust) and the structure of Earth's plates.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Understand the changes in Earth's past and the investigative methods used to determine geologic time, including: rock sequences, relative dating, fossil correlation, and radiometric dating; geologic time scales, historic changes in life forms, and the evidence for absolute ages (e.g., radiometric methods, tree rings, paleomagnetism).

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Explain plate tectonic theory and understand the evidence that supports it.

Energy in Earth's System: Describe convection as the mechanism for moving heat energy from deep within Earth to the surface and discuss how this process results in plate tectonics, including: geological manifestations (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building) that occur at plate boundaries; impact of plate motions on societies and the environment (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes).

Geochemical Cycles: Know that Earth's system contains a fixed amount of natural resources that cycle among land, water, the atmosphere, and living things (e.g., carbon and nitrogen cycles, rock cycle, water cycle, ground water, aquifers).

Geochemical Cycles: Describe the composition and structure of Earth's materials, including: the major rock types (i.e., sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic) and their formation; natural resources (e.g., minerals, petroleum) and their formation.

Grade: 10
Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the characteristics and the evolution of Earth in terms of the geosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Recognize that radiometric data indicate that Earth is at least 4 billion years old and that Earth has changed during that period.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the internal structure of Earth (e.g., core, mantle, crust) and the structure of Earth's plates.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Understand the changes in Earth's past and the investigative methods used to determine geologic time, including: rock sequences, relative dating, fossil correlation, and radiometric dating; geologic time scales, historic changes in life forms, and the evidence for absolute ages (e.g., radiometric methods, tree rings, paleomagnetism).

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Explain plate tectonic theory and understand the evidence that supports it.

Energy in Earth's System: Describe convection as the mechanism for moving heat energy from deep within Earth to the surface and discuss how this process results in plate tectonics, including: geological manifestations (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building) that occur at plate boundaries; impact of plate motions on societies and the environment (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes).

Geochemical Cycles: Know that Earth's system contains a fixed amount of natural resources that cycle among land, water, the atmosphere, and living things (e.g., carbon and nitrogen cycles, rock cycle, water cycle, ground water, aquifers).

Geochemical Cycles: Describe the composition and structure of Earth's materials, including: the major rock types (i.e., sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic) and their formation; natural resources (e.g., minerals, petroleum) and their formation.

Grade: 11
Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the characteristics and the evolution of Earth in terms of the geosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Recognize that radiometric data indicate that Earth is at least 4 billion years old and that Earth has changed during that period.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the internal structure of Earth (e.g., core, mantle, crust) and the structure of Earth's plates.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Understand the changes in Earth's past and the investigative methods used to determine geologic time, including: rock sequences, relative dating, fossil correlation, and radiometric dating; geologic time scales, historic changes in life forms, and the evidence for absolute ages (e.g., radiometric methods, tree rings, paleomagnetism).

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Explain plate tectonic theory and understand the evidence that supports it.

Energy in Earth's System: Describe convection as the mechanism for moving heat energy from deep within Earth to the surface and discuss how this process results in plate tectonics, including: geological manifestations (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building) that occur at plate boundaries; impact of plate motions on societies and the environment (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes).

Geochemical Cycles: Know that Earth's system contains a fixed amount of natural resources that cycle among land, water, the atmosphere, and living things (e.g., carbon and nitrogen cycles, rock cycle, water cycle, ground water, aquifers).

Geochemical Cycles: Describe the composition and structure of Earth's materials, including: the major rock types (i.e., sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic) and their formation; natural resources (e.g., minerals, petroleum) and their formation.

Grade: 12
Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the characteristics and the evolution of Earth in terms of the geosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Recognize that radiometric data indicate that Earth is at least 4 billion years old and that Earth has changed during that period.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Describe the internal structure of Earth (e.g., core, mantle, crust) and the structure of Earth's plates.

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Understand the changes in Earth's past and the investigative methods used to determine geologic time, including: rock sequences, relative dating, fossil correlation, and radiometric dating; geologic time scales, historic changes in life forms, and the evidence for absolute ages (e.g., radiometric methods, tree rings, paleomagnetism).

Characteristics and Evolution of Earth: Explain plate tectonic theory and understand the evidence that supports it.

Energy in Earth's System: Describe convection as the mechanism for moving heat energy from deep within Earth to the surface and discuss how this process results in plate tectonics, including: geological manifestations (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building) that occur at plate boundaries; impact of plate motions on societies and the environment (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes).

Geochemical Cycles: Know that Earth's system contains a fixed amount of natural resources that cycle among land, water, the atmosphere, and living things (e.g., carbon and nitrogen cycles, rock cycle, water cycle, ground water, aquifers).

Geochemical Cycles: Describe the composition and structure of Earth's materials, including: the major rock types (i.e., sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic) and their formation; natural resources (e.g., minerals, petroleum) and their formation.

Nevada  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Natural Selection: Explain the fossil record of ancient life forms by applying the idea of natural selection and its evolutionary consequences.

Extinction: Explain how the extinction of species is a common occurrence and fossil records indicate that most species that have lived on the earth no longer exist.

Earth's Structure and Composition: Explain how there is a relationship between the relative densities and states (phases) of Earth materials and the layering on, in, and above the Earth.

Change Over Time: Explain how catastrophic events have occurred and greatly influenced Earth's history.

Relative Geologic Time and the Fossil Record: Simulate and explain how relative geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Geologic Time: Compare and contrast the variety of methods by which geologic time is determined, including radioactive dating.

Earth's Internal Energy: Model and explain how the energy that propels the Earth's lithosphere plates is dominantly a result of nuclear processes deep in the Earth.

Grade: 10
Natural Selection: Explain the fossil record of ancient life forms by applying the idea of natural selection and its evolutionary consequences.

Extinction: Explain how the extinction of species is a common occurrence and fossil records indicate that most species that have lived on the earth no longer exist.

Earth's Structure and Composition: Explain how there is a relationship between the relative densities and states (phases) of Earth materials and the layering on, in, and above the Earth.

Change Over Time: Explain how catastrophic events have occurred and greatly influenced Earth's history.

Relative Geologic Time and the Fossil Record: Simulate and explain how relative geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Geologic Time: Compare and contrast the variety of methods by which geologic time is determined, including radioactive dating.

Earth's Internal Energy: Model and explain how the energy that propels the Earth's lithosphere plates is dominantly a result of nuclear processes deep in the Earth.

Grade: 11
Natural Selection: Explain the fossil record of ancient life forms by applying the idea of natural selection and its evolutionary consequences.

Extinction: Explain how the extinction of species is a common occurrence and fossil records indicate that most species that have lived on the earth no longer exist.

Earth's Structure and Composition: Explain how there is a relationship between the relative densities and states (phases) of Earth materials and the layering on, in, and above the Earth.

Change Over Time: Explain how catastrophic events have occurred and greatly influenced Earth's history.

Relative Geologic Time and the Fossil Record: Simulate and explain how relative geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Geologic Time: Compare and contrast the variety of methods by which geologic time is determined, including radioactive dating.

Earth's Internal Energy: Model and explain how the energy that propels the Earth's lithosphere plates is dominantly a result of nuclear processes deep in the Earth.

Grade: 12
Natural Selection: Explain the fossil record of ancient life forms by applying the idea of natural selection and its evolutionary consequences.

Extinction: Explain how the extinction of species is a common occurrence and fossil records indicate that most species that have lived on the earth no longer exist.

Earth's Structure and Composition: Explain how there is a relationship between the relative densities and states (phases) of Earth materials and the layering on, in, and above the Earth.

Change Over Time: Explain how catastrophic events have occurred and greatly influenced Earth's history.

Relative Geologic Time and the Fossil Record: Simulate and explain how relative geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

Geologic Time: Compare and contrast the variety of methods by which geologic time is determined, including radioactive dating.

Earth's Internal Energy: Model and explain how the energy that propels the Earth's lithosphere plates is dominantly a result of nuclear processes deep in the Earth.

New York  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Grade: 10
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Grade: 11
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Grade: 12
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students explain complex phenomena, such as tides, variations in day length, solar insulation, apparent motion of the planets, and annual traverse of the constellations.

Students use the concepts of density and heat energy to explain observations of weather patterns, seasonal changes, and the movements of the Earth's plates.

Students explain how incoming solar radiations, ocean currents, and land masses affect weather and climate.

Grade: 10
Students explain complex phenomena, such as tides, variations in day length, solar insulation, apparent motion of the planets, and annual traverse of the constellations.

Students use the concepts of density and heat energy to explain observations of weather patterns, seasonal changes, and the movements of the Earth's plates.

Students explain how incoming solar radiations, ocean currents, and land masses affect weather and climate.

Grade: 11
Students explain complex phenomena, such as tides, variations in day length, solar insulation, apparent motion of the planets, and annual traverse of the constellations.

Students use the concepts of density and heat energy to explain observations of weather patterns, seasonal changes, and the movements of the Earth's plates.

Students explain how incoming solar radiations, ocean currents, and land masses affect weather and climate.

Grade: 12
Students explain complex phenomena, such as tides, variations in day length, solar insulation, apparent motion of the planets, and annual traverse of the constellations.

Students use the concepts of density and heat energy to explain observations of weather patterns, seasonal changes, and the movements of the Earth's plates.

Students explain how incoming solar radiations, ocean currents, and land masses affect weather and climate.

Ohio  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Evaluate the content and purpose of a presentation by analyzing the language and delivery choices made by a speaker.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace) in a variety of settings.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Identify types of arguments used by the speaker, such as authority and appeals to emotion.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Analyze the credibility of the speaker (e.g., hidden agendas, slanted or biased material) and recognize fallacies of reasoning used in presentations and media messages.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Identify the speaker's choice of language and delivery styles (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) and explain how they contribute to meaning.

Grade: 10
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Analyze the techniques used by speakers and media to influence an audience, and evaluate the effect this has on the credibility of a speaker or media message.

Evaluate the content and purpose of a presentation by analyzing the language and delivery choices made by a speaker.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace) in a variety of settings.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Interpret types of arguments used by the speaker such as authority and appeals to audience.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Evaluate the credibility of the speaker (e.g., hidden agendas, slanted or biased material) and recognize fallacies of reasoning used in presentations and media messages.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Identify how language choice and delivery styles (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) contribute to meaning.

Grade: 11
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace) in a variety of settings.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Analyze types of arguments used by a speaker, such as causation, analogy and logic.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Critique the clarity, effectiveness and overall coherence of a speaker's key points.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Evaluate how language choice, diction, syntax and delivery style (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) effect the mood and tone and impact the audience.

Grade: 12
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace).

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Analyze types of arguments used by the speaker, such as causation, analogy and logic.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Critique the clarity, effectiveness and overall coherence of a speaker's key points.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Evaluate how language choice, diction, syntax and delivery style (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) affect the mood and tone and impact the audience.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain the 4.5 billion-year-history of Earth and the 4 billion-year-history of life on Earth based on observable scientific evidence in the geologic record.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Explain the relationships of the oceans to the lithosphere and atmosphere (e.g., transfer of energy, ocean currents and landforms).

Grade Level Indicator: Processes That Shape Earth: Explain how the slow movement of material within Earth results from: thermal energy transfer (conduction and convection) from the deep interior; the action of gravitational forces on regions of different density.

Grade Level Indicator: Processes That Shape Earth: Explain the results of plate tectonic activity (e.g., magma generation, igneous intrusion, metamorphism, volcanic action, earthquakes, faulting and folding).

Grade Level Indicator: Processes That Shape Earth: Explain sea-floor spreading and continental drift using scientific evidence (e.g., fossil distributions, magnetic reversals and radiometric dating).

Grade: 10
Explain the 4.5 billion-year-history of Earth and the 4 billion-year-history of life on Earth based on observable scientific evidence in the geologic record.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Explain how geologic time can be estimated by multiple methods (e.g., rock sequences, fossil correlation and radiometric dating).

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Describe how organisms on Earth contributed to the dramatic change in oxygen content of Earth's early atmosphere.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Describe ways that human activity can alter biogeochemical cycles (e.g., carbon and nitrogen cycles) as well as food webs and energy pyramids (e.g., pest control, legume rotation crops vs. chemical fertilizers).

Grade: 11
Grade Level Indicator: The Universe: Describe how the early Earth was different from the planet we live on today, and explain the formation of the sun, Earth and the rest of the solar system from a nebular cloud of dust and gas approximately 4.5 billion years ago.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Explain heat and energy transfers in and out of the atmosphere and its involvement in weather and climate (radiation, conduction, convection and advection).

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Explain the impact of oceanic and atmospheric currents on weather and climate.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Explain how interactions among Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere have resulted in the ongoing changes of Earth's system.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Describe the effects of particulates and gases in the atmosphere including those originating from volcanic activity.

Grade Level Indicator: Earth Systems: Analyze how materials from human societies (e.g., radioactive waste and air pollution) affect both physical and chemical cycles of Earth.

Grade Level Indicator: Evolutionary Theory: Describe how the process of evolution has changed the physical world over geologic time.

Grade Level Indicator: Evolutionary Theory: Describe how geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations. Recognize that current methods include using the known decay rates of radioactive isotopes present in rocks to measure the time since the rock was formed.

Oklahoma  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Focus attention on the speaker's message.

Listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, and individual or group performances.

Monitor speaker's message and clarity and understanding to formulate and provide effective verbal and nonverbal feedback.

Grade: 10
Engage in critical, empathetic, appreciative, and reflective listening to interpret, respond and evaluate speaker's messages.

Grade: 11
Demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathetic, appreciative, and reflective listening to interpret, respond and evaluate speaker's messages.

Use effective strategies for listening that prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

Listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, and individual or group performances.

Use effective strategies to evaluate own listening such as asking questions for clarification, comparing and contrasting interpretations with others, and researching points of interest or contention.

Use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

Grade: 12
Demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathetic, appreciative, and reflective listening to interpret, respond and evaluate speaker's messages.

Use effective strategies for listening that prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

Listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, and individual or group performances.

Use effective strategies to evaluate own listening such as asking questions for clarification, comparing and contrasting interpretations with others, and researching points of interest or contention.

Use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

The solid crust of the earth consists of separate plates that move very slowly pressing against one another in some places and pulling apart in other places (i.e., volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain building).

Grade: 10
Geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

The solid crust of the earth consists of separate plates that move very slowly pressing against one another in some places and pulling apart in other places (i.e., volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain building).

Grade: 11
Geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

The solid crust of the earth consists of separate plates that move very slowly pressing against one another in some places and pulling apart in other places (i.e., volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain building).

Grade: 12
Geologic time can be estimated by observing rock sequences and using fossils to correlate the sequences at various locations.

The solid crust of the earth consists of separate plates that move very slowly pressing against one another in some places and pulling apart in other places (i.e., volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain building).

Oregon  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe methods of determining ages of rocks and fossils.

Use rock sequences and fossil evidence to determine geologic history.

Describe and analyze theories of Earth's origin and early history using scientific evidence.

Describe how earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and continental movements result from slow plate motions.

Describe how the evolution of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Grade: 10
Describe methods of determining ages of rocks and fossils.

Use rock sequences and fossil evidence to determine geologic history.

Describe and analyze theories of Earth's origin and early history using scientific evidence.

Describe how earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and continental movements result from slow plate motions.

Describe how the evolution of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Grade: 11
Describe methods of determining ages of rocks and fossils.

Use rock sequences and fossil evidence to determine geologic history.

Describe and analyze theories of Earth's origin and early history using scientific evidence.

Describe how earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and continental movements result from slow plate motions.

Describe how the evolution of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Grade: 12
Describe methods of determining ages of rocks and fossils.

Use rock sequences and fossil evidence to determine geologic history.

Describe and analyze theories of Earth's origin and early history using scientific evidence.

Describe how earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and continental movements result from slow plate motions.

Describe how the evolution of life caused dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, which did not originally contain oxygen.

Pennsylvania  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Analyze data from fossil records, similarities in anatomy and physiology, embryological studies and DNA studies that are relevant to the theory of evolution.

Compare modern day descendants of extinct species and propose possible scientific accounts for their present appearance.

Describe changes that illustrate major events in the earth's development based on a time line.

Illustrate and explain plate tectonics as the mechanism of continental movement and sea floor changes.

Grade: 10
Analyze data from fossil records, similarities in anatomy and physiology, embryological studies and DNA studies that are relevant to the theory of evolution.

Compare modern day descendants of extinct species and propose possible scientific accounts for their present appearance.

Describe changes that illustrate major events in the earth's development based on a time line.

Illustrate and explain plate tectonics as the mechanism of continental movement and sea floor changes.

Grade: 11
Explain how radioactive isotopes that are subject to decay can be used to estimate the age of materials.

Apply the predictability of nuclear decay to estimate the age of materials that contain radioactive isotopes.

Interpret geological evidence supporting evolution.

Apply knowledge of radioactive decay to assess the age of various earth features and objects.

Grade: 12
Explain how radioactive isotopes that are subject to decay can be used to estimate the age of materials.

Apply the predictability of nuclear decay to estimate the age of materials that contain radioactive isotopes.

Interpret geological evidence supporting evolution.

Apply knowledge of radioactive decay to assess the age of various earth features and objects.

Rhode Island  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 11
Understand that barriers to effective communication exist; develop vocal, content, and organizational strategies that accommodate those barriers and enhance understanding and practice of spoken messages and listening behaviors.

Grade: 12
Understand that barriers to effective communication exist; develop vocal, content, and organizational strategies that accommodate those barriers and enhance understanding and practice of spoken messages and listening behaviors.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere. Solar radiation heats the land masses, oceans, and air. Transfer of heat energy at the boundaries between the atmosphere, the land masses, and the oceans results in layers of different temperatures and densities in both the ocean and atmosphere. The action of gravitational force on regions of different densities causes them to rise or fall (and such circulation, influenced by the rotation of the earth, produces winds and ocean currents).

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that plants alter the earth's atmosphere by removing carbon dioxide from it, using carbon and light energy to make sugars, releasing oxygen. This process, commonly known as photosynthesis, is largely responsible for the oxygen content of the air.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the slow movement of material within the earth results from heat flowing out from the deep interior and the action of gravitational forces on regions of different density.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the solid crust of the earth (including both the continents and the ocean basins) consists of separate plates that ride on a denser, hot, gradually deformable layer of the earth. The crust sections move very slowly, pressing against one another in some places, pulling apart in other places. Ocean-floor plates may slide under continental plates, sinking deep into the earth. The surface layers of these plates may fold, forming mountain ranges. This is known as 'plate tectonics'.

Grade: 10
The Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere. Solar radiation heats the land masses, oceans, and air. Transfer of heat energy at the boundaries between the atmosphere, the land masses, and the oceans results in layers of different temperatures and densities in both the ocean and atmosphere. The action of gravitational force on regions of different densities causes them to rise or fall (and such circulation, influenced by the rotation of the earth, produces winds and ocean currents).

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that plants alter the earth's atmosphere by removing carbon dioxide from it, using carbon and light energy to make sugars, releasing oxygen. This process, commonly known as photosynthesis, is largely responsible for the oxygen content of the air.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the slow movement of material within the earth results from heat flowing out from the deep interior and the action of gravitational forces on regions of different density.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the solid crust of the earth (including both the continents and the ocean basins) consists of separate plates that ride on a denser, hot, gradually deformable layer of the earth. The crust sections move very slowly, pressing against one another in some places, pulling apart in other places. Ocean-floor plates may slide under continental plates, sinking deep into the earth. The surface layers of these plates may fold, forming mountain ranges. This is known as 'plate tectonics'.

Grade: 11
The Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere. Solar radiation heats the land masses, oceans, and air. Transfer of heat energy at the boundaries between the atmosphere, the land masses, and the oceans results in layers of different temperatures and densities in both the ocean and atmosphere. The action of gravitational force on regions of different densities causes them to rise or fall (and such circulation, influenced by the rotation of the earth, produces winds and ocean currents).

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that plants alter the earth's atmosphere by removing carbon dioxide from it, using carbon and light energy to make sugars, releasing oxygen. This process, commonly known as photosynthesis, is largely responsible for the oxygen content of the air.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the slow movement of material within the earth results from heat flowing out from the deep interior and the action of gravitational forces on regions of different density.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the solid crust of the earth (including both the continents and the ocean basins) consists of separate plates that ride on a denser, hot, gradually deformable layer of the earth. The crust sections move very slowly, pressing against one another in some places, pulling apart in other places. Ocean-floor plates may slide under continental plates, sinking deep into the earth. The surface layers of these plates may fold, forming mountain ranges. This is known as 'plate tectonics'.

Grade: 12
The Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that weather (in the short run) and climate (in the long run) involve the transfer of energy in and out of the atmosphere. Solar radiation heats the land masses, oceans, and air. Transfer of heat energy at the boundaries between the atmosphere, the land masses, and the oceans results in layers of different temperatures and densities in both the ocean and atmosphere. The action of gravitational force on regions of different densities causes them to rise or fall (and such circulation, influenced by the rotation of the earth, produces winds and ocean currents).

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that plants alter the earth's atmosphere by removing carbon dioxide from it, using carbon and light energy to make sugars, releasing oxygen. This process, commonly known as photosynthesis, is largely responsible for the oxygen content of the air.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the slow movement of material within the earth results from heat flowing out from the deep interior and the action of gravitational forces on regions of different density.

Processes That Shape the Earth: By the end of the 12th grade, all students will know that the solid crust of the earth (including both the continents and the ocean basins) consists of separate plates that ride on a denser, hot, gradually deformable layer of the earth. The crust sections move very slowly, pressing against one another in some places, pulling apart in other places. Ocean-floor plates may slide under continental plates, sinking deep into the earth. The surface layers of these plates may fold, forming mountain ranges. This is known as 'plate tectonics'.

South Carolina  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Grade: 10
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Grade: 11
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Grade: 12
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Infer how the fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Describe how gravitational forces led to the production of heat in the early history of the Earth and to the differentiation of the Earth into a core, mantle, and crust.

Examine how internal heat produces convection currents that are the driving force for plate tectonics.

Analyze the effects of atmospheric convection, atmospheric dust and cloud cover, rotation of the Earth, revolution of the Earth, and tilt of the Earth's rotational axis on global climates and seasons.

Describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and infer possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

Trace the historical development of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils including the contributions of Hutton (uniformitarianism) and Lyell (crosscutting relationships and inclusions). (H, N)

Describe techniques of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils to establish a sequence of geologic events, including the age of fossils.

Describe radioactive decay as a means of dating events in the Earth's history.

Trace the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics including the contributions of Wegener. (H, N)

Relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the evolution of single-celled life forms.

Infer how a fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Grade: 10
Infer how the fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Describe how gravitational forces led to the production of heat in the early history of the Earth and to the differentiation of the Earth into a core, mantle, and crust.

Examine how internal heat produces convection currents that are the driving force for plate tectonics.

Analyze the effects of atmospheric convection, atmospheric dust and cloud cover, rotation of the Earth, revolution of the Earth, and tilt of the Earth's rotational axis on global climates and seasons.

Describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and infer possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

Trace the historical development of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils including the contributions of Hutton (uniformitarianism) and Lyell (crosscutting relationships and inclusions). (H, N)

Describe techniques of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils to establish a sequence of geologic events, including the age of fossils.

Describe radioactive decay as a means of dating events in the Earth's history.

Trace the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics including the contributions of Wegener. (H, N)

Relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the evolution of single-celled life forms.

Infer how a fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Grade: 11
Infer how the fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Describe how gravitational forces led to the production of heat in the early history of the Earth and to the differentiation of the Earth into a core, mantle, and crust.

Examine how internal heat produces convection currents that are the driving force for plate tectonics.

Analyze the effects of atmospheric convection, atmospheric dust and cloud cover, rotation of the Earth, revolution of the Earth, and tilt of the Earth's rotational axis on global climates and seasons.

Describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and infer possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

Trace the historical development of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils including the contributions of Hutton (uniformitarianism) and Lyell (crosscutting relationships and inclusions). (H, N)

Describe techniques of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils to establish a sequence of geologic events, including the age of fossils.

Describe radioactive decay as a means of dating events in the Earth's history.

Trace the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics including the contributions of Wegener. (H, N)

Relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the evolution of single-celled life forms.

Infer how a fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Grade: 12
Infer how the fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

Describe how gravitational forces led to the production of heat in the early history of the Earth and to the differentiation of the Earth into a core, mantle, and crust.

Examine how internal heat produces convection currents that are the driving force for plate tectonics.

Analyze the effects of atmospheric convection, atmospheric dust and cloud cover, rotation of the Earth, revolution of the Earth, and tilt of the Earth's rotational axis on global climates and seasons.

Describe changes in atmospheric conditions over time and infer possible causes including the greenhouse effect and ice age cycles.

Trace the historical development of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils including the contributions of Hutton (uniformitarianism) and Lyell (crosscutting relationships and inclusions). (H, N)

Describe techniques of relative dating using rock sequences and fossils to establish a sequence of geologic events, including the age of fossils.

Describe radioactive decay as a means of dating events in the Earth's history.

Trace the historical development of the theory of plate tectonics including the contributions of Wegener. (H, N)

Relate the dramatic changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere (introduction of oxygen) to the evolution of single-celled life forms.

Infer how a fossil record can reveal evolutionary changes over time.

South Dakota  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe the use of isotopic dating in determining the age of fossils.

Analyze evidence found in fossil records to describe how populations change over time.

Explain changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere of Earth.

Analyze geochemical cycles in Earth system.

Understand various methods used to determine geological time.

Investigate how interactions among Earth's crust, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of Earth system.

Grade: 10
Describe the use of isotopic dating in determining the age of fossils.

Analyze evidence found in fossil records to describe how populations change over time.

Explain changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere of Earth.

Analyze geochemical cycles in Earth system.

Understand various methods used to determine geological time.

Investigate how interactions among Earth's crust, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of Earth system.

Grade: 11
Describe the use of isotopic dating in determining the age of fossils.

Analyze evidence found in fossil records to describe how populations change over time.

Explain changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere of Earth.

Analyze geochemical cycles in Earth system.

Understand various methods used to determine geological time.

Investigate how interactions among Earth's crust, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of Earth system.

Grade: 12
Describe the use of isotopic dating in determining the age of fossils.

Analyze evidence found in fossil records to describe how populations change over time.

Explain changes occurring within the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere of Earth.

Analyze geochemical cycles in Earth system.

Understand various methods used to determine geological time.

Investigate how interactions among Earth's crust, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms have resulted in the ongoing change of Earth system.

Tennessee  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Grade: 10
The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Grade: 11
The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Grade: 12
The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Investigate the process of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to arrange various fossils on a diagram of sedimentary rock strata, using a collection of fossil pictures.

Level 1: The student is able to determine the process of fossil formation, given a set of fossil pictures or fossil samples.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Level 1: The student is able to differentiate between the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the processes of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils using casts and molds.

Level 1: The student is able to collect and/or observe various fossils and relate them to biogeographical changes.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the approximate age of a fossil, given the amount of Carbon-14 atoms found in the fossil and the half-life of Carbon-14.

Explain the components of the tectonic cycle.

Interpret and assimilate data related to the atmospheric cycle.

Evaluate the role of living organisms within the Earth system cycles.

Level 1: The student is able to explore continental drift/plate tectonics theory using models.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between diverging and converging plate boundaries using a labeled diagram of mantle convection currents.

Level 2: The student is able to explain and map the relationship between plate tectonics to mountain building, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

Level 3: The student is able to construct the geological cycle for a physiographic region or geologic time period in Tennessee.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment on the formation and extinction of species.

Level 1: The student is able to explain the law of uniformitarianism.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossils to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide clues to life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.)

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a given fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes affect the development of new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret basic rock types, time periods, and faults from geologic maps.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Investigate the history of life.

Interpret and evaluate the fossil record for evidence of biological evolution.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment in the formation and extinction of species through geologic time using fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize how scientists estimate the age of the Earth.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossil forms of life to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide evidence for life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the environmental adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (e.g., fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.).

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret the sequence of rock strata using superposition, cross cutting relationships, inclusions, the fossil record, and absolute data techniques.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a particular fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes will affect the development of a new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Recognize different types of plate boundaries (e.g., divergent, convergent, and transform including continental vs. oceanic).

Interpret evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Recognize that convection currents are the driving mechanisms for plate tectonics.

Describe the processes associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, and mountain building.

Level 1: The student is able to identify plate boundaries on diagrams.

Level 1: The student is able to match boundaries of continents by shape as evidence of plate tectonics.

Level 1: The student is able to identify the layers of the earth's structure.

Level 2: The student is able to identify geologic features associated with divergent, convergent, and transform (continental and oceanic) plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how convection currents drive plate tectonics.

Level 2: The student is able to associate volcanoes and earthquake activity with plate boundaries using a map.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among reverse, normal, and strike-slip faults.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between anticline and syncline.

Level 2: The student is able to label illustrations of movement of convection cells within mantle and their relationship to convergent and divergent plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to correlate plate movement by plotting movement of hot spots through time.

Level 3: The student is able to predict the location and arrangement of the continents at a specified future time.

Level 3: The student is able to describe the location of the Hawaiian islands at a specified future time.

Level 1: The student is able to illustrate the hydrologic cycle and distinguish among condensation, evaporation, precipitation, transpiration, groundwater, runoff, bodies of water, etc.

Grade: 10
Investigate the process of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to arrange various fossils on a diagram of sedimentary rock strata, using a collection of fossil pictures.

Level 1: The student is able to determine the process of fossil formation, given a set of fossil pictures or fossil samples.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Level 1: The student is able to differentiate between the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the processes of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils using casts and molds.

Level 1: The student is able to collect and/or observe various fossils and relate them to biogeographical changes.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the approximate age of a fossil, given the amount of Carbon-14 atoms found in the fossil and the half-life of Carbon-14.

Explain the components of the tectonic cycle.

Interpret and assimilate data related to the atmospheric cycle.

Evaluate the role of living organisms within the Earth system cycles.

Level 1: The student is able to explore continental drift/plate tectonics theory using models.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between diverging and converging plate boundaries using a labeled diagram of mantle convection currents.

Level 2: The student is able to explain and map the relationship between plate tectonics to mountain building, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

Level 3: The student is able to construct the geological cycle for a physiographic region or geologic time period in Tennessee.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment on the formation and extinction of species.

Level 1: The student is able to explain the law of uniformitarianism.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossils to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide clues to life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.)

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a given fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes affect the development of new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret basic rock types, time periods, and faults from geologic maps.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Investigate the history of life.

Interpret and evaluate the fossil record for evidence of biological evolution.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment in the formation and extinction of species through geologic time using fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize how scientists estimate the age of the Earth.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossil forms of life to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide evidence for life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the environmental adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (e.g., fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.).

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret the sequence of rock strata using superposition, cross cutting relationships, inclusions, the fossil record, and absolute data techniques.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a particular fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes will affect the development of a new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Recognize different types of plate boundaries (e.g., divergent, convergent, and transform including continental vs. oceanic).

Interpret evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Recognize that convection currents are the driving mechanisms for plate tectonics.

Describe the processes associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, and mountain building.

Level 1: The student is able to identify plate boundaries on diagrams.

Level 1: The student is able to match boundaries of continents by shape as evidence of plate tectonics.

Level 1: The student is able to identify the layers of the earth's structure.

Level 2: The student is able to identify geologic features associated with divergent, convergent, and transform (continental and oceanic) plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how convection currents drive plate tectonics.

Level 2: The student is able to associate volcanoes and earthquake activity with plate boundaries using a map.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among reverse, normal, and strike-slip faults.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between anticline and syncline.

Level 2: The student is able to label illustrations of movement of convection cells within mantle and their relationship to convergent and divergent plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to correlate plate movement by plotting movement of hot spots through time.

Level 3: The student is able to predict the location and arrangement of the continents at a specified future time.

Level 3: The student is able to describe the location of the Hawaiian islands at a specified future time.

Level 1: The student is able to illustrate the hydrologic cycle and distinguish among condensation, evaporation, precipitation, transpiration, groundwater, runoff, bodies of water, etc.

Grade: 11
Investigate the process of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to arrange various fossils on a diagram of sedimentary rock strata, using a collection of fossil pictures.

Level 1: The student is able to determine the process of fossil formation, given a set of fossil pictures or fossil samples.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Level 1: The student is able to differentiate between the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the processes of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils using casts and molds.

Level 1: The student is able to collect and/or observe various fossils and relate them to biogeographical changes.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the approximate age of a fossil, given the amount of Carbon-14 atoms found in the fossil and the half-life of Carbon-14.

Explain the components of the tectonic cycle.

Interpret and assimilate data related to the atmospheric cycle.

Evaluate the role of living organisms within the Earth system cycles.

Level 1: The student is able to explore continental drift/plate tectonics theory using models.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between diverging and converging plate boundaries using a labeled diagram of mantle convection currents.

Level 2: The student is able to explain and map the relationship between plate tectonics to mountain building, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

Level 3: The student is able to construct the geological cycle for a physiographic region or geologic time period in Tennessee.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment on the formation and extinction of species.

Level 1: The student is able to explain the law of uniformitarianism.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossils to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide clues to life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.)

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a given fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes affect the development of new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret basic rock types, time periods, and faults from geologic maps.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Investigate the history of life.

Interpret and evaluate the fossil record for evidence of biological evolution.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment in the formation and extinction of species through geologic time using fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize how scientists estimate the age of the Earth.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossil forms of life to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide evidence for life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the environmental adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (e.g., fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.).

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret the sequence of rock strata using superposition, cross cutting relationships, inclusions, the fossil record, and absolute data techniques.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a particular fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes will affect the development of a new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Recognize different types of plate boundaries (e.g., divergent, convergent, and transform including continental vs. oceanic).

Interpret evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Recognize that convection currents are the driving mechanisms for plate tectonics.

Describe the processes associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, and mountain building.

Level 1: The student is able to identify plate boundaries on diagrams.

Level 1: The student is able to match boundaries of continents by shape as evidence of plate tectonics.

Level 1: The student is able to identify the layers of the earth's structure.

Level 2: The student is able to identify geologic features associated with divergent, convergent, and transform (continental and oceanic) plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how convection currents drive plate tectonics.

Level 2: The student is able to associate volcanoes and earthquake activity with plate boundaries using a map.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among reverse, normal, and strike-slip faults.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between anticline and syncline.

Level 2: The student is able to label illustrations of movement of convection cells within mantle and their relationship to convergent and divergent plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to correlate plate movement by plotting movement of hot spots through time.

Level 3: The student is able to predict the location and arrangement of the continents at a specified future time.

Level 3: The student is able to describe the location of the Hawaiian islands at a specified future time.

Level 1: The student is able to illustrate the hydrologic cycle and distinguish among condensation, evaporation, precipitation, transpiration, groundwater, runoff, bodies of water, etc.

Grade: 12
Investigate the process of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to arrange various fossils on a diagram of sedimentary rock strata, using a collection of fossil pictures.

Level 1: The student is able to determine the process of fossil formation, given a set of fossil pictures or fossil samples.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Level 1: The student is able to differentiate between the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the processes of fossil formation.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils using casts and molds.

Level 1: The student is able to collect and/or observe various fossils and relate them to biogeographical changes.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the approximate age of a fossil, given the amount of Carbon-14 atoms found in the fossil and the half-life of Carbon-14.

Explain the components of the tectonic cycle.

Interpret and assimilate data related to the atmospheric cycle.

Evaluate the role of living organisms within the Earth system cycles.

Level 1: The student is able to explore continental drift/plate tectonics theory using models.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between diverging and converging plate boundaries using a labeled diagram of mantle convection currents.

Level 2: The student is able to explain and map the relationship between plate tectonics to mountain building, volcanoes, and earthquakes.

Level 3: The student is able to construct the geological cycle for a physiographic region or geologic time period in Tennessee.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Interpret and evaluate the evidence for biological evolution in the fossil record.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment on the formation and extinction of species.

Level 1: The student is able to explain the law of uniformitarianism.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossils to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide clues to life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.)

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a given fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes affect the development of new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret basic rock types, time periods, and faults from geologic maps.

Interpret and evaluate the nature of geologic time.

Investigate the evolution of Earth.

Investigate the history of life.

Interpret and evaluate the fossil record for evidence of biological evolution.

Demonstrate the effect of the environment in the formation and extinction of species through geologic time using fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize how scientists estimate the age of the Earth.

Level 1: The student is able to recognize that fossils are found in sedimentary rock.

Level 1: The student is able to construct mock fossils.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast fossil forms of life to modern organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize that fossils contained in sedimentary rock provide evidence for life forms, changes in those life forms, and environmental changes.

Level 2: The student is able to examine the fossil record to determine the environmental adaptations of organisms.

Level 2: The student is able to cite and explain the evidence for plate tectonics (e.g., fossil record, mountain ranges, rock strata, paleomagnetism, paleoclimates, and configuration of the continents.).

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the mechanisms for determining the advance of geologic history: relative and absolute dating.

Level 2: The student is able to construct and interpret a geologic timetable for the evolution of Earth and the history of life.

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate the relative age of various fossils in sedimentary rock, given a diagram of rock strata.

Level 2: The student is able to interpret the sequence of rock strata using superposition, cross cutting relationships, inclusions, the fossil record, and absolute data techniques.

Level 2: The student is able to create a diorama that depicts the ancient environment or habitat in which a particular fossil existed.

Level 3: The student is able to predict how environmental changes will affect the development of a new species or extinction of an existing species, given a written scenario.

Level 3: The student is able to describe what a geologic time traveler might see in the future of Tennessee.

Recognize different types of plate boundaries (e.g., divergent, convergent, and transform including continental vs. oceanic).

Interpret evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Recognize that convection currents are the driving mechanisms for plate tectonics.

Describe the processes associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, and mountain building.

Level 1: The student is able to identify plate boundaries on diagrams.

Level 1: The student is able to match boundaries of continents by shape as evidence of plate tectonics.

Level 1: The student is able to identify the layers of the earth's structure.

Level 2: The student is able to identify geologic features associated with divergent, convergent, and transform (continental and oceanic) plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the evidence for plate tectonics using paleomagnetism, fossil record, continental boundaries, and hot spots.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how convection currents drive plate tectonics.

Level 2: The student is able to associate volcanoes and earthquake activity with plate boundaries using a map.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among reverse, normal, and strike-slip faults.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between anticline and syncline.

Level 2: The student is able to label illustrations of movement of convection cells within mantle and their relationship to convergent and divergent plate boundaries.

Level 2: The student is able to correlate plate movement by plotting movement of hot spots through time.

Level 3: The student is able to predict the location and arrangement of the continents at a specified future time.

Level 3: The student is able to describe the location of the Hawaiian islands at a specified future time.

Level 1: The student is able to illustrate the hydrologic cycle and distinguish among condensation, evaporation, precipitation, transpiration, groundwater, runoff, bodies of water, etc.

Texas  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student is expected to listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, or individual or group performances of scripts.

The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

Grade: 10
The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

Grade: 11
The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

Grade: 12
The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

Subject: Science

Grade: 10
The student is expected to investigate radioactive elements to determine half-life.

Grade: 11
The student is expected to investigate radioactive elements to determine half-life.

The student is expected to research and describe the historical development of scientific theories of the Earth's formation.

The student is expected to use current theories to design and construct a geologic time scale.

The student is expected to research and describe the historical development of the theories of plate tectonics including continental drift and sea-floor spreading.

The student is expected to analyze the processes that power the movement of the Earth's continental and oceanic plates and identify the effects of this movement including faulting, folding, earthquakes, and volcanic activity.

The student is expected to analyze methods of tracking continental and oceanic plate movement.

The student is expected to compare the topography of the ocean floor to the topography of the continents.

The student is expected to identify the atmosphere as a mixture of gases, water vapor, and particulate matter.

The student is expected to analyze the range of atmospheric conditions that organisms will tolerate including types of gases, temperature, particulate matter, and moisture.

The student is expected to determine the impact on the atmosphere of natural events and human activity.

Grade: 12
The student is expected to investigate radioactive elements to determine half-life.

The student is expected to research and describe the historical development of scientific theories of the Earth's formation.

The student is expected to use current theories to design and construct a geologic time scale.

The student is expected to research and describe the historical development of the theories of plate tectonics including continental drift and sea-floor spreading.

The student is expected to analyze the processes that power the movement of the Earth's continental and oceanic plates and identify the effects of this movement including faulting, folding, earthquakes, and volcanic activity.

The student is expected to analyze methods of tracking continental and oceanic plate movement.

The student is expected to compare the topography of the ocean floor to the topography of the continents.

The student is expected to identify the atmosphere as a mixture of gases, water vapor, and particulate matter.

The student is expected to analyze the range of atmospheric conditions that organisms will tolerate including types of gases, temperature, particulate matter, and moisture.

The student is expected to determine the impact on the atmosphere of natural events and human activity.

Utah  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen actively, e.g., determine organization, ask questions, attend to nonverbal cues.

Use comprehension strategies before, during, and after listening to functional information, e.g., following directions and test instructions, understanding PA announcements, attending to schedule changes.

Establish a purpose for viewing, e.g., acquiring information or ideas, seeking enjoyment, providing understanding.

Activate prior knowledge, e.g., knowledge of media, knowledge of subject.

Focus both visual and auditory attention.

Focus attention, e.g., eliminate distractions, listen and watch selectively, postpone reactions.

Use visual and auditory skills to determine organization, e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, question/answer, problem/solution, description, chronology, process.

Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen attentively to others' ideas and opinions.

Grade: 10
Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen actively, e.g., determine organization, ask questions, attend to nonverbal cues.

Use comprehension strategies before, during, and after listening to functional information, e.g., following directions and test instructions, understanding PA announcements, attending to schedule changes.

Listen for relevant information.

Focus both visual and auditory attention.

Focus attention, e.g., eliminate distractions, listen and watch selectively, postpone reactions.

Use visual and auditory skills to determine organization, e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, question/answer, problem/solution, description, chronology, process.

Listen and view critically, e.g., separate fact from opinion.

Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen attentively to others' ideas and opinions.

Grade: 11
Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen actively, e.g., determine organization, ask questions, attend to nonverbal cues.

Use comprehension strategies before, during, and after listening to functional information, e.g., following directions and test instructions, understanding PA announcements, attending to schedule changes.

Listen for relevant information.

Focus both visual and auditory attention.

Focus attention, e.g., eliminate distractions, listen and watch selectively, postpone reactions.

Use visual and auditory skills to determine organization, e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, question/answer, problem/solution, description, chronology, process.

Listen and view critically, e.g., separate fact from opinion.

Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen attentively to others' ideas and opinions.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Relate the nature of science to the historical development of the theory of evolution.

Interpret graphical data relating half-life and age of a radioactive substance.

Present evidence that the process that formed Earth's heavy elements continues in stars today.

Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.

Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.

Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.

Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

Model the movement and interaction of plates.

Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.

Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).

Analyze data relating to the concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the past 100 years.

Grade: 10
Relate the nature of science to the historical development of the theory of evolution.

Interpret graphical data relating half-life and age of a radioactive substance.

Present evidence that the process that formed Earth's heavy elements continues in stars today.

Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.

Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.

Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.

Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

Model the movement and interaction of plates.

Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.

Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).

Analyze data relating to the concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the past 100 years.

Grade: 11
Relate the nature of science to the historical development of the theory of evolution.

Interpret graphical data relating half-life and age of a radioactive substance.

Present evidence that the process that formed Earth's heavy elements continues in stars today.

Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.

Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.

Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.

Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

Model the movement and interaction of plates.

Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.

Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).

Analyze data relating to the concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the past 100 years.

Grade: 12
Relate the nature of science to the historical development of the theory of evolution.

Interpret graphical data relating half-life and age of a radioactive substance.

Present evidence that the process that formed Earth's heavy elements continues in stars today.

Define and describe the location of the major plates and plate boundaries.

Compare the movement and results of movement along convergent, divergent, and transform plate boundaries.

Relate the location of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate boundaries.

Evaluate the evidence for the current theory of plate tectonics.

Model the movement and interaction of plates.

Relate the movement and interaction of plates to volcanic eruptions, mountain building, and climate changes.

Predict the effects of plate movement on other Earth systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions affect weather, mountain building diverts waterways, uplift changes elevation that alters plant and animal diversity, upwelling from ocean vents results in changes in biomass).

Research ways the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact with the atmosphere (e.g., volcanic eruptions putting ash and gases into the atmosphere, hurricanes, changes in vegetation).

Analyze data relating to the concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the past 100 years.

Virginia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 10
Essential Knowledge, Skills, and Processes: Students are expected to assume responsibility for and participate in small-group learning activities by contributing ideas and respectfully listening to and considering the views of the other group members.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Comparing different scientific explanations for the same observations about the Earth.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that any valid scientific theory has passed tests designed to invalidate it.

Key concepts include igneous (intrusive and extrusive).

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that igneous rock forms from molten rock that cools and hardens either below or on Earth's surface.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that extrusive igneous rocks have small or no crystals, resulting in fine-grained or glassy textures.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that intrusive igneous rocks have larger crystals and a coarser texture.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that extrusive igneous rocks include pumice, obsidian, and basalt.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that intrusive igneous rocks include granite.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to classify the following rock types as igneous, metamorphic, or sedimentary: pumice, obsidian, basalt, granite, sandstone, conglomerate, shale, limestone, slate, schist, gneiss, marble, and quartzite.

Key concepts include tectonic processes (subduction, rifting and sea floor spreading, and continental collision).

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that the core, mantle, and crust of Earth are dynamic systems, constantly in motion.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that earth's lithosphere is divided into plates that are in motion with respect to one another.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that most geologic activity (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain building) occurs as a result of relative motion along plate boundaries.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that plate motion occurs as a consequence of convection in Earth's mantle. Plate tectonics is driven by convection in the mantle.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that there are two different types of crust - oceanic and continental - that have very different characteristics.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the Piedmont is an area of rolling hills underlain by mostly ancient igneous and metamorphic rocks. The igneous rocks are the roots of volcanoes formed during an ancient episode of subduction that occurred before the formation of the Appalachian Mountains.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the Blue Ridge is a high ridge separating the Piedmont from the Valley and Ridge Province. The billion-year-old igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Blue Ridge are the oldest in the state. Some metamorphism of these rocks occurred during the formation of the Appalachian Mountains.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that earth consists of a solid, mostly iron inner core; a liquid, mostly iron outer core; a rocky, plastic mantle; and a rocky, brittle crust.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that relative plate motions and plate boundaries are convergent (subduction and continental collision), divergent (sea floor spreading), or transform.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that continental drift is a consequence of plate tectonics.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that earthquake activity is associated with all plate boundaries.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that major features of transform boundaries include strike-slip faults.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that a fault is a break or crack in Earth's crust along which movement has occurred.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that most active faults are located at or near plate boundaries. Earthquakes result when movement occurs along a fault.

Key concepts include traces or remains of ancient, often extinct, life are preserved by various means in many sedimentary rocks.

Key concepts include superposition, cross-cutting relationships, index fossils, and radioactive decay are methods of dating bodies of rock.

Key concepts include absolute and relative dating have different applications but can be used together to determine the age of rocks and structures.

Key concepts include rocks and fossils from many different geologic periods and epochs are found in Virginia.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that evidence of ancient, often extinct life is preserved in many sedimentary rocks.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that fossil evidence indicates that life forms have changed and become more complex over geologic time.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that earth is very ancient - about 4.6 billion years old.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that the history of Earth and the ages of rocks can be investigated and understood by studying rocks and fossils.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that a fossil is the remains, impression, or other evidence preserved in rock of the former existence of life.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that some ways in which fossils can be preserved are molds, casts, and original bone or shell.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that nearly all fossils are found in sedimentary rocks.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that in Virginia, fossils are found mainly in the Coastal Plain, Valley and Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau provinces.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that most Virginia fossils are of marine organisms. This indicates that large areas of the state have been periodically covered by seawater.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic fossils are found in Virginia.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to describe how life has changed and become more complex over geologic time.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that relative time places events in a sequence without assigning any numerical ages.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that fossils, superposition, and crosscutting relations are used to determine the relative ages of rocks.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that absolute time places a numerical age on an event.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that radioactive decay is used to determine the absolute age of rocks.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to interpret a simple geologic history diagram, using superposition and crosscutting relations.

Key concepts include scientific evidence for atmospheric changes over geologic time.

Key concepts include current theories related to the effects of early life on the chemical makeup of the atmosphere.

Key concepts include comparison of the Earth's atmosphere to that of other planets.

Key concepts include atmospheric regulation mechanisms including the effects of density differences and energy transfer.

Key concepts include potential atmospheric compositional changes due to human, biologic, and geologic activity.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that the composition of Earth's atmosphere has changed over geologic time.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that earth's atmosphere is unique in the solar system in that it contains substantial oxygen.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that the composition of the atmosphere can change due to human, biologic, and geologic activity.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the early atmosphere contained little oxygen and more carbon dioxide than the modern atmosphere.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that early photosynthetic life such as cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) consumed carbon dioxide and generated oxygen.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that it was only after early photosynthetic life generated oxygen that animal life became possible.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that man-made chemicals have decreased the ozone concentration in the upper atmosphere.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the ability of Earth's atmosphere to absorb and retain heat is affected by the presence of gases like water vapor and carbon dioxide.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to explain how volcanic activity or meteor impacts could affect the atmosphere and life on Earth.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that earth's surface is much more efficiently heated by the sun than is the atmosphere.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that energy transfer between Earth's surface and the atmosphere creates the weather.

Grade: 10
Key concepts include scientific explanations of the development of organisms through time (biological evolution).

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that scientists have developed hypotheses about conditions on early Earth that could have led to the formation of the first organic molecules, early self-replicating molecules, the source of free oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, and the appearance of prokaryotic and later eukaryotic cells.

Key concepts include fossil record interpretation.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to compare structural characteristics of an extinct organism, as evidenced by its fossil record, with present, familiar organisms.

Key concepts include evidence found in fossil records.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that although there is not a complete record of ancient life for the past 3.5 billion years, a great deal of modern knowledge about the history of life comes from the fossil record.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that a fossil is any evidence of an organism that lived long ago.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that scientists have used the fossil record to construct a history of life on Earth.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to determine the relative age of a fossil given information about its position in the rock and absolute dating by radioactive decay.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to differentiate between relative and absolute dating based on fossils in biological evolution.

Grade: 11
The periodic table is a tool used for the investigations of isotopes, half lives, and radioactive decay.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that half-life is the length of time required for half of a given sample of a radioactive isotope to decay.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students should be able to determine the half-life of a radioactive substance.

Vermont  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
This is evident when students identify, record, model, and explain evidence of change over time (e.g., origin and evolution of the earth's biological, ecological, geological systems).

This is evident when students identify, model, explain, and analyze the interrelated parts and connections between earth systems (e.g., sun, radioactive decay, and gravitational energy; weather and climate).

Grade: 10
This is evident when students identify, record, model, and explain evidence of change over time (e.g., origin and evolution of the earth's biological, ecological, geological systems).

This is evident when students identify, model, explain, and analyze the interrelated parts and connections between earth systems (e.g., sun, radioactive decay, and gravitational energy; weather and climate).

Grade: 11
This is evident when students identify, record, model, and explain evidence of change over time (e.g., origin and evolution of the earth's biological, ecological, geological systems).

This is evident when students identify, model, explain, and analyze the interrelated parts and connections between earth systems (e.g., sun, radioactive decay, and gravitational energy; weather and climate).

Grade: 12
This is evident when students identify, record, model, and explain evidence of change over time (e.g., origin and evolution of the earth's biological, ecological, geological systems).

This is evident when students identify, model, explain, and analyze the interrelated parts and connections between earth systems (e.g., sun, radioactive decay, and gravitational energy; weather and climate).

Washington  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Uses listening strategy appropriate to purpose (Grade 9 framework).

Grade: 10
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Analyzes speaker's and listener's purpose to select and use an appropriate listening strategy (Grade 10 framework).

Grade: 11
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Analyzes speaker's and listener's purpose to select and use an appropriate listening strategy (Grade 10 framework).

Grade: 12
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Analyzes speaker's and listener's purpose to select and use an appropriate listening strategy (Grade 10 framework).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Earth and Space Science: Components and Patterns of Earth Systems: Describe the patterns and arrangements of the Earth system, including the solid Earth, hydrosphere, and layers of the atmosphere.

Earth and Space Science: Processes and Interactions in Earth Systems: Explain how patterns and arrangements of landforms, oceans, and the atmosphere are determined by natural processes and how plate tectonics accounts for crustal movements over time.

Grade: 10
Earth and Space Science: Components and Patterns of Earth Systems: Describe the patterns and arrangements of the Earth system, including the solid Earth, hydrosphere, and layers of the atmosphere.

Earth and Space Science: Processes and Interactions in Earth Systems: Explain how patterns and arrangements of landforms, oceans, and the atmosphere are determined by natural processes and how plate tectonics accounts for crustal movements over time.

Grade: 11
Earth and Space Science: Components and Patterns of Earth Systems: Describe the patterns and arrangements of the Earth system, including the solid Earth, hydrosphere, and layers of the atmosphere.

Earth and Space Science: Processes and Interactions in Earth Systems: Explain how patterns and arrangements of landforms, oceans, and the atmosphere are determined by natural processes and how plate tectonics accounts for crustal movements over time.

Grade: 12
Earth and Space Science: Components and Patterns of Earth Systems: Describe the patterns and arrangements of the Earth system, including the solid Earth, hydrosphere, and layers of the atmosphere.

Earth and Space Science: Processes and Interactions in Earth Systems: Explain how patterns and arrangements of landforms, oceans, and the atmosphere are determined by natural processes and how plate tectonics accounts for crustal movements over time.

Wisconsin  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Grade: 10
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Grade: 11
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Grade: 12
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Energy in the Earth System: Using the science themes, distinguish between internal energies (decay of radioactive isotopes, gravity) and external energies (sun) in the earth's systems and show how these sources of energy have an impact on those systems.

Geochemical Cycles: Analyze the geochemical and physical cycles of the earth and use them to describe movements of matter.

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Using the science themes, describe theories of the origins and evolution of the universe and solar system, including the earth system as a part of the solar system, and relate these theories and their implications to geologic time on earth.

Grade: 10
Energy in the Earth System: Using the science themes, distinguish between internal energies (decay of radioactive isotopes, gravity) and external energies (sun) in the earth's systems and show how these sources of energy have an impact on those systems.

Geochemical Cycles: Analyze the geochemical and physical cycles of the earth and use them to describe movements of matter.

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Using the science themes, describe theories of the origins and evolution of the universe and solar system, including the earth system as a part of the solar system, and relate these theories and their implications to geologic time on earth.

Grade: 11
Energy in the Earth System: Using the science themes, distinguish between internal energies (decay of radioactive isotopes, gravity) and external energies (sun) in the earth's systems and show how these sources of energy have an impact on those systems.

Geochemical Cycles: Analyze the geochemical and physical cycles of the earth and use them to describe movements of matter.

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Using the science themes, describe theories of the origins and evolution of the universe and solar system, including the earth system as a part of the solar system, and relate these theories and their implications to geologic time on earth.

Grade: 12
Energy in the Earth System: Using the science themes, distinguish between internal energies (decay of radioactive isotopes, gravity) and external energies (sun) in the earth's systems and show how these sources of energy have an impact on those systems.

Geochemical Cycles: Analyze the geochemical and physical cycles of the earth and use them to describe movements of matter.

The Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Using the science themes, describe theories of the origins and evolution of the universe and solar system, including the earth system as a part of the solar system, and relate these theories and their implications to geologic time on earth.

West Virginia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students will review listening behaviors prior to a school wide audience activity (e.g., staying alert; resisting distractions; identifying and adapting to the speaker's purpose).

Students will listen to identify the purpose, make predictions, distinguish fact from opinion and construct meaning from discussion, speech or media.

Grade: 10
Students will practice and master listening, speaking and viewing by using a variety of techniques (e.g., videos, power point presentations; audiotape; web pages).

Grade: 11
Students will practice and master listening, speaking and viewing objectives (e.g., videos; PowerPoint presentations; web pages; evaluating a selection on audiotape).

Grade: 12
Students will identify the barriers to effective listening and plan methods to overcome them.

Students will listen accurately before recording direct and indirect quotations.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Energy in the Earth System: Students will demonstrate the relationships of temperature, air pressure, wind speed, wind direction and humidity as elements of weather.

Geochemical Cycles: Students will use models to describe interactive cycles such as the water, the nitrogen and the carbon dioxide cycles.

Origin and Changes in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will examine how scientists use seismographic evidence in determining structure and composition of the Earth's interior.

Origin and Changes in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will determine the relative age of materials using time-stratigraphic and bio-stratigraphic relationships.

Origin and Changes in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will relate changes in the Earth's surface to the motion of lithospheric plates.

Origin and Changes in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will summarize and discuss the evidentiary basis for the Theory of Plate Tectonics.

Grade: 10
Evolution and Interdependence of Organisms: Students will recognize that fossil records provide a scientific explanation for variation in the species and common ancestors.

Energy in the Earth System: Students will investigate and compare theories of the source of the Earth's magnetic field and relate Earth's electromagnetic field to the dynamics of the magnetosphere.

Energy in the Earth System: Students will discuss theories for the causes of plate tectonics.

Origin and Evolution in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will investigate fossils as evidence for evolution and indicators of paleo-environments.

Origin and Evolution in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will compare and contrast morphological features of fossils to present-day organisms.

Origin and Evolution in the Earth Systems and Universe: Students will use fossil evidence to estimate the relative and absolute ages of rock layers.

Grade: 11
Geology: Students will identify components of the solid earth and the natural processes relating to its development.

Geology: Students will list, identify, and sequence eras, epochs and periods in relation to earth history and geologic development.

Geology: Students will utilize fossil evidence to estimate the relative and absolute ages of rock layers (time-stratographic and biostratographic).

Geology: Students will estimate the absolute age of materials using existing radioisotopic data.

Geology: Students will identify and describe tectonic forces relating to internal energy production and convection currents.

Geology: Students will understand the cause and effect relationships of degradational and tectonic forces with respect to the dynamic earth and its surface (e.g., volcanoes, earthquakes).

Oceanography: Students will investigate the evolution of the ocean floor that results in the creation of new materials and features.

Meteorology: Students will investigate and explain, heat transfer in the atmosphere and its relationship to meteorological processes (e.g., pressure, winds, evaporation, condensation, and precipitation).

Grade: 12
Geology: Students will identify components of the solid earth and the natural processes relating to its development.

Geology: Students will list, identify, and sequence eras, epochs and periods in relation to earth history and geologic development.

Geology: Students will utilize fossil evidence to estimate the relative and absolute ages of rock layers (time-stratographic and biostratographic).

Geology: Students will estimate the absolute age of materials using existing radioisotopic data.

Geology: Students will identify and describe tectonic forces relating to internal energy production and convection currents.

Geology: Students will understand the cause and effect relationships of degradational and tectonic forces with respect to the dynamic earth and its surface (e.g., volcanoes, earthquakes).

Oceanography: Students will investigate the evolution of the ocean floor that results in the creation of new materials and features.

Meteorology: Students will investigate and explain, heat transfer in the atmosphere and its relationship to meteorological processes (e.g., pressure, winds, evaporation, condensation, and precipitation).

Wyoming  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Grade: 10
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Grade: 11
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Grade: 12
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Geochemical Cycles: Students describe the Earth as a closed system and demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the following systems: geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. Students explain the role of energy in each of these systems, such as weather patterns, global climate, weathering, and plate tectonics.

Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Students investigate geologic time through comparing rock sequences, the fossil record, and decay rates of radioactive isotopes.

Grade: 10
Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Geochemical Cycles: Students describe the Earth as a closed system and demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the following systems: geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. Students explain the role of energy in each of these systems, such as weather patterns, global climate, weathering, and plate tectonics.

Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Students investigate geologic time through comparing rock sequences, the fossil record, and decay rates of radioactive isotopes.

Grade: 11
Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Geochemical Cycles: Students describe the Earth as a closed system and demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the following systems: geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. Students explain the role of energy in each of these systems, such as weather patterns, global climate, weathering, and plate tectonics.

Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Students investigate geologic time through comparing rock sequences, the fossil record, and decay rates of radioactive isotopes.

Grade: 12
Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Geochemical Cycles: Students describe the Earth as a closed system and demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the following systems: geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. Students explain the role of energy in each of these systems, such as weather patterns, global climate, weathering, and plate tectonics.

Earth, Space, and Physical Systems: Origin and Evolution of the Earth System: Students investigate geologic time through comparing rock sequences, the fossil record, and decay rates of radioactive isotopes.