Alaska  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Understand that living things are made up mostly of cells and that all life processes occur in cells (Cells).

Grade: 10
Understand that living things are made up mostly of cells and that all life processes occur in cells (Cells).

Grade: 11
Understand that living things are made up mostly of cells and that all life processes occur in cells (Cells).

Grade: 12
Understand that living things are made up mostly of cells and that all life processes occur in cells (Cells).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Alabama  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students will practice listening and viewing skills in a variety of situations: Lectures.

Students will practice listening and viewing skills in a variety of situations: Multimedia presentations.

Grade: 10
Students will demonstrate listening skills: Standard English recognition.

Students will apply personal study skills: Listening actively.

Students will apply personal study skills: Reviewing with partner.

Grade: 11
Students will apply critical reading and viewing skills to analysis of print and nonprint media: Artistic value and literary elements.

Students will participate constructively in classroom and small-group discussion: Listening.

Grade: 12
Students will listen effectively in a wide range of circumstances.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will identify solutions in terms of components, solubility, concentration, and conductivity: Comparing saturated, unsaturated, and supersaturated solutions; Comparing characteristics of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes; Describing factors that affect solubility and rate of solution, including nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, and pressure on gases

Students will describe cell processes necessary for achieving homeostasis, including active and passive transport, osmosis, diffusion, exocytosis, and endocytosis: Identifying functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in cellular activities; Comparing the reaction of plant and animal cells in isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic solutions; Explaining how surface area, cell size, temperature, light, and pH affect cellular activities; Applying the concept of fluid pressure to biological systems

Students will describe similarities and differences of cell organelles, using diagrams and tables: Identifying scientists who contributed to the cell theory; Distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; Identifying various technologies used to observe cells

Students will describe solubility in terms of energy changes associated with the solution process: Using solubility curves to interpret saturation levels; Explaining the conductivity of electrolytic solutions; Describing acids and bases in terms of strength, concentration, pH, and neutralization reactions; Describing factors that affect the rate of solution; Solving problems involving molarity, including solution preparation and dilution

Students will Students will determine effects of the fishing industry on the aquatic environment: Describing basic principles involved in fish production; Explaining various methods of pond preparation, predator control, and species management; Explaining harvesting techniques and methods of transporting fish to market

Students will describe various structures and equipment used in growing aquacrops: Determining the suitability of habitat construction for aquaculture; Identifying biological concerns in a recirculating or closed system

Students will identify natural subsurface openings, including lava tubes, solution cavities, and caves: Explaining the process that leads to sinkholes in karst development

Grade: 10
Students will identify solutions in terms of components, solubility, concentration, and conductivity: Comparing saturated, unsaturated, and supersaturated solutions; Comparing characteristics of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes; Describing factors that affect solubility and rate of solution, including nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, and pressure on gases

Students will describe cell processes necessary for achieving homeostasis, including active and passive transport, osmosis, diffusion, exocytosis, and endocytosis: Identifying functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in cellular activities; Comparing the reaction of plant and animal cells in isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic solutions; Explaining how surface area, cell size, temperature, light, and pH affect cellular activities; Applying the concept of fluid pressure to biological systems

Students will describe similarities and differences of cell organelles, using diagrams and tables: Identifying scientists who contributed to the cell theory; Distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; Identifying various technologies used to observe cells

Students will describe solubility in terms of energy changes associated with the solution process: Using solubility curves to interpret saturation levels; Explaining the conductivity of electrolytic solutions; Describing acids and bases in terms of strength, concentration, pH, and neutralization reactions; Describing factors that affect the rate of solution; Solving problems involving molarity, including solution preparation and dilution

Students will Students will determine effects of the fishing industry on the aquatic environment: Describing basic principles involved in fish production; Explaining various methods of pond preparation, predator control, and species management; Explaining harvesting techniques and methods of transporting fish to market

Students will describe various structures and equipment used in growing aquacrops: Determining the suitability of habitat construction for aquaculture; Identifying biological concerns in a recirculating or closed system

Students will identify natural subsurface openings, including lava tubes, solution cavities, and caves: Explaining the process that leads to sinkholes in karst development

Grade: 11
Students will identify solutions in terms of components, solubility, concentration, and conductivity: Comparing saturated, unsaturated, and supersaturated solutions; Comparing characteristics of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes; Describing factors that affect solubility and rate of solution, including nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, and pressure on gases

Students will describe cell processes necessary for achieving homeostasis, including active and passive transport, osmosis, diffusion, exocytosis, and endocytosis: Identifying functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in cellular activities; Comparing the reaction of plant and animal cells in isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic solutions; Explaining how surface area, cell size, temperature, light, and pH affect cellular activities; Applying the concept of fluid pressure to biological systems

Students will describe similarities and differences of cell organelles, using diagrams and tables: Identifying scientists who contributed to the cell theory; Distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; Identifying various technologies used to observe cells

Students will describe solubility in terms of energy changes associated with the solution process: Using solubility curves to interpret saturation levels; Explaining the conductivity of electrolytic solutions; Describing acids and bases in terms of strength, concentration, pH, and neutralization reactions; Describing factors that affect the rate of solution; Solving problems involving molarity, including solution preparation and dilution

Students will Students will determine effects of the fishing industry on the aquatic environment: Describing basic principles involved in fish production; Explaining various methods of pond preparation, predator control, and species management; Explaining harvesting techniques and methods of transporting fish to market

Students will describe various structures and equipment used in growing aquacrops: Determining the suitability of habitat construction for aquaculture; Identifying biological concerns in a recirculating or closed system

Students will identify natural subsurface openings, including lava tubes, solution cavities, and caves: Explaining the process that leads to sinkholes in karst development

Grade: 12
Students will identify solutions in terms of components, solubility, concentration, and conductivity: Comparing saturated, unsaturated, and supersaturated solutions; Comparing characteristics of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes; Describing factors that affect solubility and rate of solution, including nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, and pressure on gases

Students will describe cell processes necessary for achieving homeostasis, including active and passive transport, osmosis, diffusion, exocytosis, and endocytosis: Identifying functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in cellular activities; Comparing the reaction of plant and animal cells in isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic solutions; Explaining how surface area, cell size, temperature, light, and pH affect cellular activities; Applying the concept of fluid pressure to biological systems

Students will describe similarities and differences of cell organelles, using diagrams and tables: Identifying scientists who contributed to the cell theory; Distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; Identifying various technologies used to observe cells

Students will describe solubility in terms of energy changes associated with the solution process: Using solubility curves to interpret saturation levels; Explaining the conductivity of electrolytic solutions; Describing acids and bases in terms of strength, concentration, pH, and neutralization reactions; Describing factors that affect the rate of solution; Solving problems involving molarity, including solution preparation and dilution

Students will Students will determine effects of the fishing industry on the aquatic environment: Describing basic principles involved in fish production; Explaining various methods of pond preparation, predator control, and species management; Explaining harvesting techniques and methods of transporting fish to market

Students will describe various structures and equipment used in growing aquacrops: Determining the suitability of habitat construction for aquaculture; Identifying biological concerns in a recirculating or closed system

Students will identify natural subsurface openings, including lava tubes, solution cavities, and caves: Explaining the process that leads to sinkholes in karst development

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Arkansas  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Establish a purpose for listening and identify relevant information.

Analyzing media: Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various types of media.

Grade: 10
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Identify barriers to listening and generate methods to overcome them.

Evaluating media credibility: Identify and evaluate propaganda, disinformation, and censorship within a given medium.

Grade: 11
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Identify barriers to listening and generate methods to overcome them.

Evaluating media credibility: Use appropriate criteria to evaluate media with emphasis on prejudice, censorship, and disinformation.

Grade: 12
Listening for information, interpretation, critical analysis, and evaluation: Identify barriers to listening and generate methods to overcome them .

Evaluating media credibility: Use appropriate criteria to evaluate the impact of media on public opinion, trends, and beliefs.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Understand the nature of solutions (solubility, concentrations, pH, acids/bases, colligative properties, and buffer solutions).

Develop and implement a workable scientific inquiry independently and with a group using standard safety procedures.

Investigate and identify cellular processes, including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, synthesis of new molecules, and cell division.

Identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

Compare cells from different parts of plants including roots, stems, and leaves, to show specialization of structure and function.

Identify the structures of bacteria and describe the multiple roles of bacteria in maintaining health such as digestion and causing diseases such as streptococcus infections and diphtheria.

Assess the connections between pure science and applied science to the world of work by performing labs and activities common to the life sciences.

Grade: 10
Understand the nature of solutions (solubility, concentrations, pH, acids/bases, colligative properties, and buffer solutions).

Develop and implement a workable scientific inquiry independently and with a group using standard safety procedures.

Investigate and identify cellular processes, including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, synthesis of new molecules, and cell division.

Identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

Compare cells from different parts of plants including roots, stems, and leaves, to show specialization of structure and function.

Identify the structures of bacteria and describe the multiple roles of bacteria in maintaining health such as digestion and causing diseases such as streptococcus infections and diphtheria.

Assess the connections between pure science and applied science to the world of work by performing labs and activities common to the life sciences.

Grade: 11
Understand the nature of solutions (solubility, concentrations, pH, acids/bases, colligative properties, and buffer solutions).

Develop and implement a workable scientific inquiry independently and with a group using standard safety procedures.

Investigate and identify cellular processes, including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, synthesis of new molecules, and cell division.

Identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

Compare cells from different parts of plants including roots, stems, and leaves, to show specialization of structure and function.

Identify the structures of bacteria and describe the multiple roles of bacteria in maintaining health such as digestion and causing diseases such as streptococcus infections and diphtheria.

Assess the connections between pure science and applied science to the world of work by performing labs and activities common to the life sciences.

Grade: 12
Understand the nature of solutions (solubility, concentrations, pH, acids/bases, colligative properties, and buffer solutions).

Develop and implement a workable scientific inquiry independently and with a group using standard safety procedures.

Investigate and identify cellular processes, including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, synthesis of new molecules, and cell division.

Identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

Compare cells from different parts of plants including roots, stems, and leaves, to show specialization of structure and function.

Identify the structures of bacteria and describe the multiple roles of bacteria in maintaining health such as digestion and causing diseases such as streptococcus infections and diphtheria.

Assess the connections between pure science and applied science to the world of work by performing labs and activities common to the life sciences.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Arizona  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate visual media for language, subject matter and visual techniques used to influence attitudes, decision making and cultural perceptions

Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate the impact of visual media on the intended audience

Distinction (Honors): Conduct research to evaluate the impact of language, subject matter and visual techniques used by the media

Distinction (Honors): Research ethnical issues related to the laws, rules and regulations for the use of media

Grade: 10
Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate visual media for language, subject matter and visual techniques used to influence attitudes, decision making and cultural perceptions

Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate the impact of visual media on the intended audience

Distinction (Honors): Conduct research to evaluate the impact of language, subject matter and visual techniques used by the media

Distinction (Honors): Research ethnical issues related to the laws, rules and regulations for the use of media

Grade: 11
Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate visual media for language, subject matter and visual techniques used to influence attitudes, decision making and cultural perceptions

Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate the impact of visual media on the intended audience

Distinction (Honors): Conduct research to evaluate the impact of language, subject matter and visual techniques used by the media

Distinction (Honors): Research ethnical issues related to the laws, rules and regulations for the use of media

Grade: 12
Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate visual media for language, subject matter and visual techniques used to influence attitudes, decision making and cultural perceptions

Proficiency: Analyze and evaluate the impact of visual media on the intended audience

Distinction (Honors): Conduct research to evaluate the impact of language, subject matter and visual techniques used by the media

Distinction (Honors): Research ethnical issues related to the laws, rules and regulations for the use of media

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe the role of energy in cellular growth, development, and repair.

Compare the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their cellular components.

Explain the importance of water to cells.

Analyze mechanisms of transport of materials (e.g., water, ions, macromolecules) into and out of cells: passive transport, active transport.

Grade: 10
Describe the role of energy in cellular growth, development, and repair.

Compare the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their cellular components.

Explain the importance of water to cells.

Analyze mechanisms of transport of materials (e.g., water, ions, macromolecules) into and out of cells: passive transport, active transport.

Grade: 11
Describe the role of energy in cellular growth, development, and repair.

Compare the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their cellular components.

Explain the importance of water to cells.

Analyze mechanisms of transport of materials (e.g., water, ions, macromolecules) into and out of cells: passive transport, active transport.

Grade: 12
Describe the role of energy in cellular growth, development, and repair.

Compare the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their cellular components.

Explain the importance of water to cells.

Analyze mechanisms of transport of materials (e.g., water, ions, macromolecules) into and out of cells: passive transport, active transport.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students know and are able to acquire information from a variety of sources written in the target language about a topic being studied in other subjects

Students know and are able to study successfully one or more content areas in the target language

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students know and are able to acquire information from a variety of sources written in the target language about a topic being studied in other subjects

Students know and are able to study successfully one or more content areas in the target language

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students know and are able to acquire information from a variety of sources written in the target language about a topic being studied in other subjects

Students know and are able to study successfully one or more content areas in the target language

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students know and are able to acquire information from a variety of sources written in the target language about a topic being studied in other subjects

Students know and are able to study successfully one or more content areas in the target language

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

California  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, diction, and syntax.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation and evaluate the techniques used to create them (e.g., compare Shakespeare's Henry V with Kenneth Branagh's 1990 film version).

Grade: 10
Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Assess how language and delivery affect the mood and tone of the oral communication and make an impact on the audience.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation and evaluate the techniques used to create them (e.g., compare Shakespeare's Henry V with Kenneth Branagh's 1990 film version).

Grade: 11
Comprehension: Recognize strategies used by the media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture (e.g., advertisements; perpetuation of stereotypes; use of visual representations, special effects, language).

Comprehension: Interpret and evaluate the various ways in which events are presented and information is communicated by visual image makers (e.g., graphic artists, documentary filmmakers, illustrators, news photographers).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify logical fallacies used in oral addresses (e.g., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze the techniques used in media messages for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness (e.g., Orson Welles' radio broadcast 'War of the Worlds').

Grade: 12
Comprehension: Recognize strategies used by the media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture (e.g., advertisements; perpetuation of stereotypes; use of visual representations, special effects, language).

Comprehension: Interpret and evaluate the various ways in which events are presented and information is communicated by visual image makers (e.g., graphic artists, documentary filmmakers, illustrators, news photographers).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify logical fallacies used in oral addresses (e.g., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze the techniques used in media messages for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness (e.g., Orson Welles' radio broadcast 'War of the Worlds').

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students know the definitions of solute and solvent.

Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion.

Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process.

Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.

Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solution's depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point.

Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation.

Students know cells are enclosed within semipermeable membranes that regulate their interaction with their surroundings.

Students know enzymes are proteins that catalyze biochemical reactions without altering the reaction equilibrium and the activities of enzymes depend on the temperature, ionic conditions, and the pH of the surroundings.

Students know how prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells (including those from plants and animals), and viruses differ in complexity and general structure.

Students know the role of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus in the secretion of proteins.

Students know usable energy is captured from sunlight by chloroplasts and is stored through the synthesis of sugar from carbon dioxide.

Students know the role of the mitochondria in making stored chemical-bond energy available to cells by completing the breakdown of glucose to carbon dioxide.

Students know most macromolecules (polysaccharides, nucleic acids, proteins, lipids) in cells and organisms are synthesized from a small collection of simple precursors.

Students know how chemiosmotic gradients in the mitochondria and chloroplast store energy for ATP production.

Students know how eukaryotic cells are given shape and internal organization by a cytoskeleton or cell wall or both.

Students know only certain cells in a multicellular organism undergo meiosis.

Students know the cellular and molecular basis of muscle contraction, including the roles of actin, myosin, Ca+2, and ATP.

Students know how hormones (including digestive, reproductive, osmoregulatory) provide internal feedback mechanisms for homeostasis at the cellular level and in whole organisms.

Grade: 10
Students know the definitions of solute and solvent.

Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion.

Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process.

Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.

Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solution's depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point.

Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation.

Students know cells are enclosed within semipermeable membranes that regulate their interaction with their surroundings.

Students know enzymes are proteins that catalyze biochemical reactions without altering the reaction equilibrium and the activities of enzymes depend on the temperature, ionic conditions, and the pH of the surroundings.

Students know how prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells (including those from plants and animals), and viruses differ in complexity and general structure.

Students know the role of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus in the secretion of proteins.

Students know usable energy is captured from sunlight by chloroplasts and is stored through the synthesis of sugar from carbon dioxide.

Students know the role of the mitochondria in making stored chemical-bond energy available to cells by completing the breakdown of glucose to carbon dioxide.

Students know most macromolecules (polysaccharides, nucleic acids, proteins, lipids) in cells and organisms are synthesized from a small collection of simple precursors.

Students know how chemiosmotic gradients in the mitochondria and chloroplast store energy for ATP production.

Students know how eukaryotic cells are given shape and internal organization by a cytoskeleton or cell wall or both.

Students know only certain cells in a multicellular organism undergo meiosis.

Students know the cellular and molecular basis of muscle contraction, including the roles of actin, myosin, Ca+2, and ATP.

Students know how hormones (including digestive, reproductive, osmoregulatory) provide internal feedback mechanisms for homeostasis at the cellular level and in whole organisms.

Grade: 11
Students know the definitions of solute and solvent.

Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion.

Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process.

Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.

Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solution's depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point.

Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation.

Students know cells are enclosed within semipermeable membranes that regulate their interaction with their surroundings.

Students know enzymes are proteins that catalyze biochemical reactions without altering the reaction equilibrium and the activities of enzymes depend on the temperature, ionic conditions, and the pH of the surroundings.

Students know how prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells (including those from plants and animals), and viruses differ in complexity and general structure.

Students know the role of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus in the secretion of proteins.

Students know usable energy is captured from sunlight by chloroplasts and is stored through the synthesis of sugar from carbon dioxide.

Students know the role of the mitochondria in making stored chemical-bond energy available to cells by completing the breakdown of glucose to carbon dioxide.

Students know most macromolecules (polysaccharides, nucleic acids, proteins, lipids) in cells and organisms are synthesized from a small collection of simple precursors.

Students know how chemiosmotic gradients in the mitochondria and chloroplast store energy for ATP production.

Students know how eukaryotic cells are given shape and internal organization by a cytoskeleton or cell wall or both.

Students know the cellular and molecular basis of muscle contraction, including the roles of actin, myosin, Ca+2, and ATP.

Students know how hormones (including digestive, reproductive, osmoregulatory) provide internal feedback mechanisms for homeostasis at the cellular level and in whole organisms.

Grade: 12
Students know the definitions of solute and solvent.

Students know how to describe the dissolving process at the molecular level by using the concept of random molecular motion.

Students know temperature, pressure, and surface area affect the dissolving process.

Students know how to calculate the concentration of a solute in terms of grams per liter, molarity, parts per million, and percent composition.

Students know the relationship between the molality of a solute in a solution and the solution's depressed freezing point or elevated boiling point.

Students know how molecules in a solution are separated or purified by the methods of chromatography and distillation.

Students know cells are enclosed within semipermeable membranes that regulate their interaction with their surroundings.

Students know enzymes are proteins that catalyze biochemical reactions without altering the reaction equilibrium and the activities of enzymes depend on the temperature, ionic conditions, and the pH of the surroundings.

Students know how prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells (including those from plants and animals), and viruses differ in complexity and general structure.

Students know the role of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus in the secretion of proteins.

Students know usable energy is captured from sunlight by chloroplasts and is stored through the synthesis of sugar from carbon dioxide.

Students know the role of the mitochondria in making stored chemical-bond energy available to cells by completing the breakdown of glucose to carbon dioxide.

Students know most macromolecules (polysaccharides, nucleic acids, proteins, lipids) in cells and organisms are synthesized from a small collection of simple precursors.

Students know how chemiosmotic gradients in the mitochondria and chloroplast store energy for ATP production.

Students know how eukaryotic cells are given shape and internal organization by a cytoskeleton or cell wall or both.

Students know only certain cells in a multicellular organism undergo meiosis.

Students know the cellular and molecular basis of muscle contraction, including the roles of actin, myosin, Ca+2, and ATP.

Students know how hormones (including digestive, reproductive, osmoregulatory) provide internal feedback mechanisms for homeostasis at the cellular level and in whole organisms.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Canada  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Appreciate the artistry of texts: Discuss how techniques, such as irony, symbolism, perspective and proportion, communicate meaning and enhance effect in oral, print and other media texts.

Understand forms and genres: Evaluate the effectiveness of different types of media texts for presenting ideas and information.

Understand techniques and elements: Evaluate the effectiveness of oral, print and other media texts, considering the believability of plot and setting, the credibility of characters, and the development and resolution of conflict.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify ways that a change in narrator might affect the overall meaning of oral, print and other media texts.

Experiment with language: Analyze creative uses of language and visuals in popular culture, such as advertisements, electronic magazines and the Internet; recognize how imagery and figurative language, such as metaphor, create a dominant impression, mood and tone.

Relate texts to culture: Analyze how oral, print and other media texts reflect the traditions, beliefs and technologies of different cultures, communities or periods in history.

Grade: 10
Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Describe character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Describe elements found in a variety of communication situations, and explain how these elements influence the creation of texts [for example, constraints of time and space, issues of gender and culture, whether or not the audience is present in the communication situation].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Describe and address audience factors that affect text creation [such as age, prior knowledge, gender, culture, values, interests, attitudes, position of authority and power of decision].

Describe the effects of own use of stylistic techniques and rhetorical devices [for example, describe the clarity achieved by arranging words and phrases in lists; describe the emphasis created by using repetition, balance or parallel structure; and describe the audience effects achieved by using visual elements and sounds in presentations and multimedia texts].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

Analyze the relationship between a text creator's ideas and opinions and his or her underlying assumptions [such as those deriving from ideology or social status].

Explain the text creator's purpose, including implicit purpose when applicable; describe whether or not the purpose was achieved [for example, describe an author's use of juxtaposition to develop a contradictory impression of a character]; and assess the suitability of a text to the target audience.

Analyze elements or causes present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Paraphrase key messages in a specific text and identify elements present in the communication situation, in order to describe the text creator's purpose and target audience [for example, understand the subtext in a television commercial to know the intended audience].

Explain how a text can be studied to understand the context - or aspects of the communication situation within which the text was created [for example, recognize that specialized terminology in a text may represent a particular occupational group and provide insight in understanding the text; understand current issues to recognize satire in a political cartoon].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Explain the text creator's purpose, and assess the suitability of the text to the target audience in terms of the text creator's purpose [for example, assess the suitability of a feature film targeted to a young adult audience in terms of appropriateness of content].

Analyze elements present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

Explain the relationship between text and context in terms of how elements in an environment can affect the way in which a text is created.

Describe how some forms are more appropriate than others to achieve a particular purpose with an intended audience.

Explain how various audience factors may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Select an effective medium appropriate to content and context; and explain the interplay of medium, context and content [for example, select a medium like television, and assess the interplay of medium, context and content by examining the role that investigative reporters play in reporting world events in a timely and interesting manner].

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

Grade: 11
Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Describe character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Describe elements found in a variety of communication situations, and explain how these elements influence the creation of texts [for example, constraints of time and space, issues of gender and culture, whether or not the audience is present in the communication situation].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Describe and address audience factors that affect text creation [such as age, prior knowledge, gender, culture, values, interests, attitudes, position of authority and power of decision].

Describe the effects of own use of stylistic techniques and rhetorical devices [for example, describe the clarity achieved by arranging words and phrases in lists; describe the emphasis created by using repetition, balance or parallel structure; and describe the audience effects achieved by using visual elements and sounds in presentations and multimedia texts].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

Analyze the relationship between a text creator's ideas and opinions and his or her underlying assumptions [such as those deriving from ideology or social status].

Explain the text creator's purpose, including implicit purpose when applicable; describe whether or not the purpose was achieved [for example, describe an author's use of juxtaposition to develop a contradictory impression of a character]; and assess the suitability of a text to the target audience.

Analyze elements or causes present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Paraphrase key messages in a specific text and identify elements present in the communication situation, in order to describe the text creator's purpose and target audience [for example, understand the subtext in a television commercial to know the intended audience].

Explain how a text can be studied to understand the context - or aspects of the communication situation within which the text was created [for example, recognize that specialized terminology in a text may represent a particular occupational group and provide insight in understanding the text; understand current issues to recognize satire in a political cartoon].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Explain the text creator's purpose, and assess the suitability of the text to the target audience in terms of the text creator's purpose [for example, assess the suitability of a feature film targeted to a young adult audience in terms of appropriateness of content].

Analyze elements present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

Explain the relationship between text and context in terms of how elements in an environment can affect the way in which a text is created.

Describe how some forms are more appropriate than others to achieve a particular purpose with an intended audience.

Explain how various audience factors may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Select an effective medium appropriate to content and context; and explain the interplay of medium, context and content [for example, select a medium like television, and assess the interplay of medium, context and content by examining the role that investigative reporters play in reporting world events in a timely and interesting manner].

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

Grade: 12
Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Describe character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Describe elements found in a variety of communication situations, and explain how these elements influence the creation of texts [for example, constraints of time and space, issues of gender and culture, whether or not the audience is present in the communication situation].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Describe and address audience factors that affect text creation [such as age, prior knowledge, gender, culture, values, interests, attitudes, position of authority and power of decision].

Describe the effects of own use of stylistic techniques and rhetorical devices [for example, describe the clarity achieved by arranging words and phrases in lists; describe the emphasis created by using repetition, balance or parallel structure; and describe the audience effects achieved by using visual elements and sounds in presentations and multimedia texts].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

Analyze the relationship between a text creator's ideas and opinions and his or her underlying assumptions [such as those deriving from ideology or social status].

Explain the text creator's purpose, including implicit purpose when applicable; describe whether or not the purpose was achieved [for example, describe an author's use of juxtaposition to develop a contradictory impression of a character]; and assess the suitability of a text to the target audience.

Analyze elements or causes present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

Paraphrase key messages in a specific text and identify elements present in the communication situation, in order to describe the text creator's purpose and target audience [for example, understand the subtext in a television commercial to know the intended audience].

Explain how a text can be studied to understand the context - or aspects of the communication situation within which the text was created [for example, recognize that specialized terminology in a text may represent a particular occupational group and provide insight in understanding the text; understand current issues to recognize satire in a political cartoon].

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

Explain the text creator's purpose, and assess the suitability of the text to the target audience in terms of the text creator's purpose [for example, assess the suitability of a feature film targeted to a young adult audience in terms of appropriateness of content].

Analyze elements present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

Explain the relationship between text and context in terms of how elements in an environment can affect the way in which a text is created.

Describe how some forms are more appropriate than others to achieve a particular purpose with an intended audience.

Explain how various audience factors may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

Select an effective medium appropriate to content and context; and explain the interplay of medium, context and content [for example, select a medium like television, and assess the interplay of medium, context and content by examining the role that investigative reporters play in reporting world events in a timely and interesting manner].

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Distinguishing between pure substances, solutions and mechanical mixtures.

Grade: 10
Trace the development of the cell theory: all living things are made up of one or more cells and the materials produced by these, cells are functional units of life, and all cells come from pre-existing cells (e.g., from Aristotle to Hooke, Pasteur, Brown, and Schwann and Schleiden; recognize that there are sub-cellular particles, such as viruses and prions, which have some characteristics of living cells).

Describe how advancements in knowledge of cell structure and function have been enhanced and are increasing as a direct result of developments in microscope technology and staining techniques (e.g., electron microscope, confocal laser scanning microscope [CLSM]).

Compare passive transport of matter by diffusion and osmosis with active transport in terms of the particle model of matter, concentration gradients, equilibrium and protein carrier molecules (e.g., particle model of matter and fluid-mosaic model).

Use models to explain and visualize complex processes like diffusion and osmosis, endo- and exocytosis, and the role of cell membrane in these processes.

Describe the cell as a functioning open system that acquires nutrients, excretes waste, and exchanges matter and energy.

Identify the structure and describe, in general terms, the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, lysosome, vacuole, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes, chloroplast and cell wall, where present, of plant and animal cells.

Compare the structure, chemical composition and function of plant and animal cells, and describe the complementary nature of the structure and function of plant and animal cells.

Describe the role of the cell membrane in maintaining equilibrium while exchanging matter.

Describe how knowledge about semi-permeable membranes, diffusion and osmosis is applied in various contexts (e.g., attachment of HIV drugs to cells and liposomes, diffusion of protein hormones into cells, staining of cells, desalination of sea water, peritoneal or mechanical dialysis, separation of bacteria from viruses, purification of water, cheese making, use of honey as an antibacterial agent and berries as a preservative agent by traditional First Nations communities).

Describe cell size and shape as they relate to surface area to volume ratio, and explain how that ratio limits cell size (e.g., compare nerve cells and blood cells in animals, or plant root hair cells and chloroplast-containing cells on the surface of leaves).

Explain and investigate the transport system in plants; i.e., xylem and phloem tissues and the processes of transpiration, including the cohesion and adhesion properties of water, turgor pressure and osmosis; diffusion, active transport and root pressure in root hairs.

Explain and investigate the gas exchange system in plants; i.e., lenticels, guard cells, stomata and the process of diffusion.

Describe the importance of mixtures and solutions in household products (e.g., baking soda, soaps, paints).

Outline the steps in separating the components of mechanical mixtures and solutions on the basis of their properties (e.g., filtration of mechanical mixtures, distillation of solutions such as crude oil).

Provide examples of insoluble and soluble mixtures (e.g., oil and water, vinegar and water); and, in general terms, account for the difference.

Link concentration changes and the concept of dilution to changes in the ratio of the amount of solute to the amount of solvent (e.g., investigate how concentrated products, such as orange juice, evaporated milk or instant coffee are made).

Identify acid and base solutions in the home, job site and laboratory (e.g., vinegar, soda pop, shampoo, battery acid, household ammonia, antacids, dish soap, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide) on the basis of their general properties; i.e., they conduct electricity, change colour of acid/base indicators and neutralize one another.

Describe, in general terms, how the digestive and circulatory systems interact to assist in the maintenance of balance (homeostasis) in the human organism.

Explain how normal fluctuations within the digestive system result in adjusting fluctuations in the circulatory system (e.g., ingestion of salt and increased blood pressure; the relationship between blood sugar and insulin production).

Analyze and explain, in general terms, a technology that is used to diagnose imbalances (e.g., endoscope, stethoscope) or to intervene and preserve balance (homeostasis) (e.g., kidney dialysis machine, pacemaker).

Relate human knowledge of cells to the development of the optical microscope and staining techniques (e.g., the work of Antony van Leeuwenhoek, Robert Hooke).

Describe the structure of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall.

Describe, using analogies where appropriate, the functions of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall (e.g., compare cell functions to the functioning of a city).

Describe how cell structure has been adapted for specific life functions (e.g., stomata in the leaves for water balance; skin cells are flat to cover large surface area; plant cell walls provide structural support; nerve cells are long for transmission of impulses; storage of chemical energy in roots [e.g., sugar beets], stems [e.g., sugar cane] and fruits [e.g., apples]).

Carry out procedures, controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required (e.g., determine the amount of thermal energy released by cellular respiration; determine the energy outputs of various foods, using simple calorimetric methods).

Using chemical names and formulas for dissolved substances, acids and bases.

Calculating the concentration of solutions in a variety of ways, including moles per litre, and calculating mass or volume when the concentration is known; e.g., per cent by volume, parts per million (ppm).

Determining the concentration of diluted solutions and the quantities of solution and solvent to use when diluting.

Describing dynamic equilibrium in a saturated solution in terms of equal rates of dissolving and crystallization.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by investigating, qualitatively, the properties of solutions and in the laboratory.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ??preparing solutions of specified concentrations, using a balance and volumetric glassware.

Describing how negative feedback, involving the autonomic nervous system and the pressure receptors (baroreceptors), regulates cardiac function (heart rate/stroke volume) and blood pressure in response to different activity levels.

Explaining how DNA, by directing protein synthesis, controls cellular processes.

Explaining the importance of maintaining a relatively constant pH in living systems.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?measuring the rates of water consumption and loss in plants and animals.

Explaining, in general terms, how carbohydrates are oxidized by glycolysis and Krebs cycle to produce reducing power in NADH and flavin dinucleotide, reduced form (FADH), and chemical potential in ATP, describing where in the cell those processes occur; and understanding that specific detailed knowledge of the biochemistry of the reactions is not required.

Explaining, in general terms, how chemiosmosis converts the reducing power of NADH and FADH to the chemical potential of ATP, describing where in the cell the process occurs; and understanding that specific detailed knowledge of the biochemistry of the reactions is not required.

Explaining the role of oxygen in cellular respiration; e.g., aerobic, anaerobic.

Summarizing and explaining the role of ATP in metabolism; e.g., synthesis, movement, active transport.

Explaining how the excretory system maintains internal equilibrium with respect to water, pH and ions.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by performing an experiment to investigate simulated urine composition, analyzing the data and summarizing the role of the kidney in homeostatic regulation of water, pH and ionic substances.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by researching the human excretory system and designing a flow chart model to describe how the human organism maintains homeostasis with respect to water and ions in a situation where either the water intake was high; e.g., tea, coffee, soda pop, or where the sodium ion intake was excessive; e.g., anchovy pizza, cheese.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making analogies between kidney function and renal and peritoneal dialysis.

Explaining the role of the body surface in maintenance of organism equilibrium; e.g., temperature regulation, protection from pathogens.

Explaining the metabolic roles hormones play in homeostasis; i.e., thyroxine to metabolism, insulin to blood sugar regulation, HGH to growth, ADH to water regulation.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?inferring the role of ADH and aldosterone in the maintenance of homeostasis of water and ions, by the analysis and interpretation of data on blood and urine composition.

Explaining how information in nucleic acids contained in the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts gives evidence for the relationships among organisms of different species.

Providing examples, from living and nonliving systems, of how dissolving substances in water is often a prerequisite for chemical change.

Differentiating between electrolytes and nonelectrolytes.

Using simple calculations to show different ways of expressing concentration; e.g., per cent by mass and volume, parts per million (ppm).

Outlining the steps required to prepare a solution and a dilution of a solution.

Describing an equilibrium system in a saturated solution in terms of equal rates of dissolving and crystallization.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by using a simple conductivity apparatus to perform an experiment to identify solutions.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?using a balance and volumetric glassware to prepare solutions of specified concentration.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?calculating, from empirical data, the concentration of solutions in moles per litre of solution and determining mass or volume from such concentrations.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?calculating, from empirical data, the concentration of diluted solutions, and the quantities of a solution and water to use when diluting.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?using empirical data and dissociation equations to calculate the concentration of ions in a solution.

Identifying spectator ions in reactions taking place in aqueous solution.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by writing and balancing net ionic chemical equations to represent reactions taking place in aqueous solution.

Using evidence from titration to determine the concentration of a solution.

Using evidence from precipitation reactions to determine the concentration of ions in solutions, using gravimetric procedures.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?performing and evaluating an experiment, based on a precipitation reaction, to determine the concentration of a solution.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by designing, performing and evaluating an experiment based on such methods as crystallization, filtration or titration, to determine the concentration of a solution.

Calculating H3O+ (aq) and OH- (aq) concentrations, pH and pOH for solutions, using the ionization constant for water, Kw.

Predicting, qualitatively, changes in pH and pOH when a solution is diluted.

Performing calculations to determine masses of solutes, volumes or concentrations of solutions from pH, pOH, [H3O+ (aq)], [OH- (aq)], Ka and Kb.

Grade: 11
Trace the development of the cell theory: all living things are made up of one or more cells and the materials produced by these, cells are functional units of life, and all cells come from pre-existing cells (e.g., from Aristotle to Hooke, Pasteur, Brown, and Schwann and Schleiden; recognize that there are sub-cellular particles, such as viruses and prions, which have some characteristics of living cells).

Describe how advancements in knowledge of cell structure and function have been enhanced and are increasing as a direct result of developments in microscope technology and staining techniques (e.g., electron microscope, confocal laser scanning microscope [CLSM]).

Compare passive transport of matter by diffusion and osmosis with active transport in terms of the particle model of matter, concentration gradients, equilibrium and protein carrier molecules (e.g., particle model of matter and fluid-mosaic model).

Use models to explain and visualize complex processes like diffusion and osmosis, endo- and exocytosis, and the role of cell membrane in these processes.

Describe the cell as a functioning open system that acquires nutrients, excretes waste, and exchanges matter and energy.

Identify the structure and describe, in general terms, the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, lysosome, vacuole, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes, chloroplast and cell wall, where present, of plant and animal cells.

Compare the structure, chemical composition and function of plant and animal cells, and describe the complementary nature of the structure and function of plant and animal cells.

Describe the role of the cell membrane in maintaining equilibrium while exchanging matter.

Describe how knowledge about semi-permeable membranes, diffusion and osmosis is applied in various contexts (e.g., attachment of HIV drugs to cells and liposomes, diffusion of protein hormones into cells, staining of cells, desalination of sea water, peritoneal or mechanical dialysis, separation of bacteria from viruses, purification of water, cheese making, use of honey as an antibacterial agent and berries as a preservative agent by traditional First Nations communities).

Describe cell size and shape as they relate to surface area to volume ratio, and explain how that ratio limits cell size (e.g., compare nerve cells and blood cells in animals, or plant root hair cells and chloroplast-containing cells on the surface of leaves).

Explain and investigate the transport system in plants; i.e., xylem and phloem tissues and the processes of transpiration, including the cohesion and adhesion properties of water, turgor pressure and osmosis; diffusion, active transport and root pressure in root hairs.

Explain and investigate the gas exchange system in plants; i.e., lenticels, guard cells, stomata and the process of diffusion.

Describe the importance of mixtures and solutions in household products (e.g., baking soda, soaps, paints).

Outline the steps in separating the components of mechanical mixtures and solutions on the basis of their properties (e.g., filtration of mechanical mixtures, distillation of solutions such as crude oil).

Provide examples of insoluble and soluble mixtures (e.g., oil and water, vinegar and water); and, in general terms, account for the difference.

Link concentration changes and the concept of dilution to changes in the ratio of the amount of solute to the amount of solvent (e.g., investigate how concentrated products, such as orange juice, evaporated milk or instant coffee are made).

Identify acid and base solutions in the home, job site and laboratory (e.g., vinegar, soda pop, shampoo, battery acid, household ammonia, antacids, dish soap, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide) on the basis of their general properties; i.e., they conduct electricity, change colour of acid/base indicators and neutralize one another.

Describe, in general terms, how the digestive and circulatory systems interact to assist in the maintenance of balance (homeostasis) in the human organism.

Explain how normal fluctuations within the digestive system result in adjusting fluctuations in the circulatory system (e.g., ingestion of salt and increased blood pressure; the relationship between blood sugar and insulin production).

Analyze and explain, in general terms, a technology that is used to diagnose imbalances (e.g., endoscope, stethoscope) or to intervene and preserve balance (homeostasis) (e.g., kidney dialysis machine, pacemaker).

Relate human knowledge of cells to the development of the optical microscope and staining techniques (e.g., the work of Antony van Leeuwenhoek, Robert Hooke).

Describe the structure of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall.

Describe, using analogies where appropriate, the functions of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall (e.g., compare cell functions to the functioning of a city).

Describe how cell structure has been adapted for specific life functions (e.g., stomata in the leaves for water balance; skin cells are flat to cover large surface area; plant cell walls provide structural support; nerve cells are long for transmission of impulses; storage of chemical energy in roots [e.g., sugar beets], stems [e.g., sugar cane] and fruits [e.g., apples]).

Carry out procedures, controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required (e.g., determine the amount of thermal energy released by cellular respiration; determine the energy outputs of various foods, using simple calorimetric methods).

Using chemical names and formulas for dissolved substances, acids and bases.

Calculating the concentration of solutions in a variety of ways, including moles per litre, and calculating mass or volume when the concentration is known; e.g., per cent by volume, parts per million (ppm).

Determining the concentration of diluted solutions and the quantities of solution and solvent to use when diluting.

Describing dynamic equilibrium in a saturated solution in terms of equal rates of dissolving and crystallization.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by investigating, qualitatively, the properties of solutions and in the laboratory.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ??preparing solutions of specified concentrations, using a balance and volumetric glassware.

Describing how negative feedback, involving the autonomic nervous system and the pressure receptors (baroreceptors), regulates cardiac function (heart rate/stroke volume) and blood pressure in response to different activity levels.

Explaining how DNA, by directing protein synthesis, controls cellular processes.

Explaining the importance of maintaining a relatively constant pH in living systems.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?measuring the rates of water consumption and loss in plants and animals.

Explaining, in general terms, how carbohydrates are oxidized by glycolysis and Krebs cycle to produce reducing power in NADH and flavin dinucleotide, reduced form (FADH), and chemical potential in ATP, describing where in the cell those processes occur; and understanding that specific detailed knowledge of the biochemistry of the reactions is not required.

Explaining, in general terms, how chemiosmosis converts the reducing power of NADH and FADH to the chemical potential of ATP, describing where in the cell the process occurs; and understanding that specific detailed knowledge of the biochemistry of the reactions is not required.

Explaining the role of oxygen in cellular respiration; e.g., aerobic, anaerobic.

Summarizing and explaining the role of ATP in metabolism; e.g., synthesis, movement, active transport.

Explaining how the excretory system maintains internal equilibrium with respect to water, pH and ions.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by performing an experiment to investigate simulated urine composition, analyzing the data and summarizing the role of the kidney in homeostatic regulation of water, pH and ionic substances.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by researching the human excretory system and designing a flow chart model to describe how the human organism maintains homeostasis with respect to water and ions in a situation where either the water intake was high; e.g., tea, coffee, soda pop, or where the sodium ion intake was excessive; e.g., anchovy pizza, cheese.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making analogies between kidney function and renal and peritoneal dialysis.

Explaining the role of the body surface in maintenance of organism equilibrium; e.g., temperature regulation, protection from pathogens.

Explaining the metabolic roles hormones play in homeostasis; i.e., thyroxine to metabolism, insulin to blood sugar regulation, HGH to growth, ADH to water regulation.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?inferring the role of ADH and aldosterone in the maintenance of homeostasis of water and ions, by the analysis and interpretation of data on blood and urine composition.

Explaining how information in nucleic acids contained in the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts gives evidence for the relationships among organisms of different species.

Providing examples, from living and nonliving systems, of how dissolving substances in water is often a prerequisite for chemical change.

Differentiating between electrolytes and nonelectrolytes.

Using simple calculations to show different ways of expressing concentration; e.g., per cent by mass and volume, parts per million (ppm).

Outlining the steps required to prepare a solution and a dilution of a solution.

Describing an equilibrium system in a saturated solution in terms of equal rates of dissolving and crystallization.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by using a simple conductivity apparatus to perform an experiment to identify solutions.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?using a balance and volumetric glassware to prepare solutions of specified concentration.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?calculating, from empirical data, the concentration of solutions in moles per litre of solution and determining mass or volume from such concentrations.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?calculating, from empirical data, the concentration of diluted solutions, and the quantities of a solution and water to use when diluting.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?using empirical data and dissociation equations to calculate the concentration of ions in a solution.

Identifying spectator ions in reactions taking place in aqueous solution.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by writing and balancing net ionic chemical equations to represent reactions taking place in aqueous solution.

Using evidence from titration to determine the concentration of a solution.

Using evidence from precipitation reactions to determine the concentration of ions in solutions, using gravimetric procedures.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?performing and evaluating an experiment, based on a precipitation reaction, to determine the concentration of a solution.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by designing, performing and evaluating an experiment based on such methods as crystallization, filtration or titration, to determine the concentration of a solution.

Calculating H3O+ (aq) and OH- (aq) concentrations, pH and pOH for solutions, using the ionization constant for water, Kw.

Predicting, qualitatively, changes in pH and pOH when a solution is diluted.

Performing calculations to determine masses of solutes, volumes or concentrations of solutions from pH, pOH, [H3O+ (aq)], [OH- (aq)], Ka and Kb.

Grade: 12
Trace the development of the cell theory: all living things are made up of one or more cells and the materials produced by these, cells are functional units of life, and all cells come from pre-existing cells (e.g., from Aristotle to Hooke, Pasteur, Brown, and Schwann and Schleiden; recognize that there are sub-cellular particles, such as viruses and prions, which have some characteristics of living cells).

Describe how advancements in knowledge of cell structure and function have been enhanced and are increasing as a direct result of developments in microscope technology and staining techniques (e.g., electron microscope, confocal laser scanning microscope [CLSM]).

Compare passive transport of matter by diffusion and osmosis with active transport in terms of the particle model of matter, concentration gradients, equilibrium and protein carrier molecules (e.g., particle model of matter and fluid-mosaic model).

Use models to explain and visualize complex processes like diffusion and osmosis, endo- and exocytosis, and the role of cell membrane in these processes.

Describe the cell as a functioning open system that acquires nutrients, excretes waste, and exchanges matter and energy.

Identify the structure and describe, in general terms, the function of the cell membrane, nucleus, lysosome, vacuole, mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, ribosomes, chloroplast and cell wall, where present, of plant and animal cells.

Compare the structure, chemical composition and function of plant and animal cells, and describe the complementary nature of the structure and function of plant and animal cells.

Describe the role of the cell membrane in maintaining equilibrium while exchanging matter.

Describe how knowledge about semi-permeable membranes, diffusion and osmosis is applied in various contexts (e.g., attachment of HIV drugs to cells and liposomes, diffusion of protein hormones into cells, staining of cells, desalination of sea water, peritoneal or mechanical dialysis, separation of bacteria from viruses, purification of water, cheese making, use of honey as an antibacterial agent and berries as a preservative agent by traditional First Nations communities).

Describe cell size and shape as they relate to surface area to volume ratio, and explain how that ratio limits cell size (e.g., compare nerve cells and blood cells in animals, or plant root hair cells and chloroplast-containing cells on the surface of leaves).

Explain and investigate the transport system in plants; i.e., xylem and phloem tissues and the processes of transpiration, including the cohesion and adhesion properties of water, turgor pressure and osmosis; diffusion, active transport and root pressure in root hairs.

Explain and investigate the gas exchange system in plants; i.e., lenticels, guard cells, stomata and the process of diffusion.

Describe the importance of mixtures and solutions in household products (e.g., baking soda, soaps, paints).

Outline the steps in separating the components of mechanical mixtures and solutions on the basis of their properties (e.g., filtration of mechanical mixtures, distillation of solutions such as crude oil).

Provide examples of insoluble and soluble mixtures (e.g., oil and water, vinegar and water); and, in general terms, account for the difference.

Link concentration changes and the concept of dilution to changes in the ratio of the amount of solute to the amount of solvent (e.g., investigate how concentrated products, such as orange juice, evaporated milk or instant coffee are made).

Identify acid and base solutions in the home, job site and laboratory (e.g., vinegar, soda pop, shampoo, battery acid, household ammonia, antacids, dish soap, hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide) on the basis of their general properties; i.e., they conduct electricity, change colour of acid/base indicators and neutralize one another.

Describe, in general terms, how the digestive and circulatory systems interact to assist in the maintenance of balance (homeostasis) in the human organism.

Explain how normal fluctuations within the digestive system result in adjusting fluctuations in the circulatory system (e.g., ingestion of salt and increased blood pressure; the relationship between blood sugar and insulin production).

Analyze and explain, in general terms, a technology that is used to diagnose imbalances (e.g., endoscope, stethoscope) or to intervene and preserve balance (homeostasis) (e.g., kidney dialysis machine, pacemaker).

Relate human knowledge of cells to the development of the optical microscope and staining techniques (e.g., the work of Antony van Leeuwenhoek, Robert Hooke).

Describe the structure of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall.

Describe, using analogies where appropriate, the functions of the major parts of plant and animal cells, including the cell membrane, nucleus, vacuole, mitochondrion, chloroplast and cell wall (e.g., compare cell functions to the functioning of a city).

Describe how cell structure has been adapted for specific life functions (e.g., stomata in the leaves for water balance; skin cells are flat to cover large surface area; plant cell walls provide structural support; nerve cells are long for transmission of impulses; storage of chemical energy in roots [e.g., sugar beets], stems [e.g., sugar cane] and fruits [e.g., apples]).

Carry out procedures, controlling the major variables and adapting or extending procedures where required (e.g., determine the amount of thermal energy released by cellular respiration; determine the energy outputs of various foods, using simple calorimetric methods).

Using chemical names and formulas for dissolved substances, acids and bases.

Calculating the concentration of solutions in a variety of ways, including moles per litre, and calculating mass or volume when the concentration is known; e.g., per cent by volume, parts per million (ppm).

Determining the concentration of diluted solutions and the quantities of solution and solvent to use when diluting.

Describing dynamic equilibrium in a saturated solution in terms of equal rates of dissolving and crystallization.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by investigating, qualitatively, the properties of solutions and in the laboratory.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ??preparing solutions of specified concentrations, using a balance and volumetric glassware.

Describing how negative feedback, involving the autonomic nervous system and the pressure receptors (baroreceptors), regulates cardiac function (heart rate/stroke volume) and blood pressure in response to different activity levels.

Explaining how DNA, by directing protein synthesis, controls cellular processes.

Explaining the importance of maintaining a relatively constant pH in living systems.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?measuring the rates of water consumption and loss in plants and animals.

Explaining, in general terms, how carbohydrates are oxidized by glycolysis and Krebs cycle to produce reducing power in NADH and flavin dinucleotide, reduced form (FADH), and chemical potential in ATP, describing where in the cell those processes occur; and understanding that specific detailed knowledge of the biochemistry of the reactions is not required.

Explaining, in general terms, how chemiosmosis converts the reducing power of NADH and FADH to the chemical potential of ATP, describing where in the cell the process occurs; and understanding that specific detailed knowledge of the biochemistry of the reactions is not required.

Explaining the role of oxygen in cellular respiration; e.g., aerobic, anaerobic.

Summarizing and explaining the role of ATP in metabolism; e.g., synthesis, movement, active transport.

Explaining how the excretory system maintains internal equilibrium with respect to water, pH and ions.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by performing an experiment to investigate simulated urine composition, analyzing the data and summarizing the role of the kidney in homeostatic regulation of water, pH and ionic substances.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by researching the human excretory system and designing a flow chart model to describe how the human organism maintains homeostasis with respect to water and ions in a situation where either the water intake was high; e.g., tea, coffee, soda pop, or where the sodium ion intake was excessive; e.g., anchovy pizza, cheese.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by making analogies between kidney function and renal and peritoneal dialysis.

Explaining the role of the body surface in maintenance of organism equilibrium; e.g., temperature regulation, protection from pathogens.

Explaining the metabolic roles hormones play in homeostasis; i.e., thyroxine to metabolism, insulin to blood sugar regulation, HGH to growth, ADH to water regulation.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?inferring the role of ADH and aldosterone in the maintenance of homeostasis of water and ions, by the analysis and interpretation of data on blood and urine composition.

Explaining how information in nucleic acids contained in the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts gives evidence for the relationships among organisms of different species.

Providing examples, from living and nonliving systems, of how dissolving substances in water is often a prerequisite for chemical change.

Differentiating between electrolytes and nonelectrolytes.

Using simple calculations to show different ways of expressing concentration; e.g., per cent by mass and volume, parts per million (ppm).

Outlining the steps required to prepare a solution and a dilution of a solution.

Describing an equilibrium system in a saturated solution in terms of equal rates of dissolving and crystallization.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by using a simple conductivity apparatus to perform an experiment to identify solutions.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?using a balance and volumetric glassware to prepare solutions of specified concentration.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?calculating, from empirical data, the concentration of solutions in moles per litre of solution and determining mass or volume from such concentrations.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?calculating, from empirical data, the concentration of diluted solutions, and the quantities of a solution and water to use when diluting.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?using empirical data and dissociation equations to calculate the concentration of ions in a solution.

Identifying spectator ions in reactions taking place in aqueous solution.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by writing and balancing net ionic chemical equations to represent reactions taking place in aqueous solution.

Using evidence from titration to determine the concentration of a solution.

Using evidence from precipitation reactions to determine the concentration of ions in solutions, using gravimetric procedures.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by ?performing and evaluating an experiment, based on a precipitation reaction, to determine the concentration of a solution.

Skills: Students should be able to demonstrate the skills and thinking processes associated with the practice of science, by designing, performing and evaluating an experiment based on such methods as crystallization, filtration or titration, to determine the concentration of a solution.

Calculating H3O+ (aq) and OH- (aq) concentrations, pH and pOH for solutions, using the ionization constant for water, Kw.

Predicting, qualitatively, changes in pH and pOH when a solution is diluted.

Performing calculations to determine masses of solutes, volumes or concentrations of solutions from pH, pOH, [H3O+ (aq)], [OH- (aq)], Ka and Kb.

Colorado  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describing cellular organelles and their function (e.g., the relationship of ribosomes to protein synthesis; the relationship of mitochondria to energy transformation).

Explaining human body functions in terms of interacting organ systems composed of specialized structures that maintain or restore health (e.g., mechanisms involved in homeostasis, such as feedback in the endocrine system).

Using examples to explain the relationship of structure and function in organisms.

Grade: 10
Describing cellular organelles and their function (e.g., the relationship of ribosomes to protein synthesis; the relationship of mitochondria to energy transformation).

Explaining human body functions in terms of interacting organ systems composed of specialized structures that maintain or restore health (e.g., mechanisms involved in homeostasis, such as feedback in the endocrine system).

Using examples to explain the relationship of structure and function in organisms.

Grade: 11
Describing cellular organelles and their function (e.g., the relationship of ribosomes to protein synthesis; the relationship of mitochondria to energy transformation).

Explaining human body functions in terms of interacting organ systems composed of specialized structures that maintain or restore health (e.g., mechanisms involved in homeostasis, such as feedback in the endocrine system).

Using examples to explain the relationship of structure and function in organisms.

Grade: 12
Describing cellular organelles and their function (e.g., the relationship of ribosomes to protein synthesis; the relationship of mitochondria to energy transformation).

Explaining human body functions in terms of interacting organ systems composed of specialized structures that maintain or restore health (e.g., mechanisms involved in homeostasis, such as feedback in the endocrine system).

Using examples to explain the relationship of structure and function in organisms.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Connecticut  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 10
Describe significant similarities and differences in the basic structure of plant and animal cells.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in supporting cell functions.

Grade: 11
Describe significant similarities and differences in the basic structure of plant and animal cells.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in supporting cell functions.

Grade: 12
Describe significant similarities and differences in the basic structure of plant and animal cells.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in supporting cell functions.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students use new information and perspectives gained through world language study to expand their personal knowledge.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students use new information and perspectives gained through world language study to expand their personal knowledge.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students use new information and perspectives gained through world language study to expand their personal knowledge.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students use new information and perspectives gained through world language study to expand their personal knowledge.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

District of Columbia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student listens and interprets speaker's message.

The student detects speaker's slant, bias or stance.

The student comprehends purpose, theme, and point of view.

The student evaluates for purpose, fact/opinion, accuracy of evidence and organization.

Grade: 10
The student detects logic in arguments.

The student understands the speaker's bias.

The student critiques speaker's effectiveness.

The student detects fallacies or soundness in the speaker's argument.

The student identifies the speaker's tone.

Grade: 11
The student detects bias and other inconsistencies.

The student identifies specific sequence in speaker's conversations.

The student critiques objectively.

Grade: 12
The student understands the difference between listening and hearing.

The student critiques a public speaking performance using appropriate criteria.

The student critiques objectively.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The Cell: The student examines a range of cell types to know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

The Cell: The student identifies within cells the specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions, common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

The Cell: The student describes how the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attraction between the chain's parts.

The Cell: The student conducts experiments to show that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity with a narrow range.

The Cell: The student provides evidence to show that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Grade: 10
The Cell: The student examines a range of cell types to know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

The Cell: The student identifies within cells the specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions, common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

The Cell: The student describes how the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attraction between the chain's parts.

The Cell: The student conducts experiments to show that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity with a narrow range.

The Cell: The student provides evidence to show that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Grade: 11
The Cell: The student examines a range of cell types to know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

The Cell: The student identifies within cells the specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions, common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

The Cell: The student describes how the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attraction between the chain's parts.

The Cell: The student conducts experiments to show that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity with a narrow range.

The Cell: The student provides evidence to show that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Grade: 12
The Cell: The student examines a range of cell types to know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

The Cell: The student identifies within cells the specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions, common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

The Cell: The student describes how the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attraction between the chain's parts.

The Cell: The student conducts experiments to show that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity with a narrow range.

The Cell: The student provides evidence to show that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Delaware  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Evaluating expository and technical texts and media presentations for their completeness, accuracy, and clarity of communication.

Evaluating the literary merit of various texts and media presentations.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Grade: 10
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Evaluating expository and technical texts and media presentations for their completeness, accuracy, and clarity of communication.

Evaluating the literary merit of various texts and media presentations.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Grade: 11
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Evaluating expository and technical texts and media presentations for their completeness, accuracy, and clarity of communication.

Evaluating the literary merit of various texts and media presentations.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Grade: 12
Generating a purpose for reading, listening, or viewing.

Evaluating expository and technical texts and media presentations for their completeness, accuracy, and clarity of communication.

Evaluating the literary merit of various texts and media presentations.

Use a variety of sources including printed materials, personal interviews, oral reports, forums, and technological forms of information.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells are the fundamental structural and functional units of all living organisms. Cells take highly varied forms in different plants, animals, and microorganisms. Structural variations among cells determine the function each cell performs.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells have distinct and separate structures (organelles) which perform and monitor processes essential for survival of the cell (e.g., energy production, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules, storage of genetic material). The highly specific function of each organelle is directly related to its structure.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that the cell membrane defines the boundary of the cell and regulates the passage of materials into and out of the cell. Transport mechanisms across the membrane are dependent on membrane structure and concentration gradients.

Grade: 10
Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells are the fundamental structural and functional units of all living organisms. Cells take highly varied forms in different plants, animals, and microorganisms. Structural variations among cells determine the function each cell performs.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells have distinct and separate structures (organelles) which perform and monitor processes essential for survival of the cell (e.g., energy production, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules, storage of genetic material). The highly specific function of each organelle is directly related to its structure.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that the cell membrane defines the boundary of the cell and regulates the passage of materials into and out of the cell. Transport mechanisms across the membrane are dependent on membrane structure and concentration gradients.

Grade: 11
Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells are the fundamental structural and functional units of all living organisms. Cells take highly varied forms in different plants, animals, and microorganisms. Structural variations among cells determine the function each cell performs.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells have distinct and separate structures (organelles) which perform and monitor processes essential for survival of the cell (e.g., energy production, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules, storage of genetic material). The highly specific function of each organelle is directly related to its structure.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that the cell membrane defines the boundary of the cell and regulates the passage of materials into and out of the cell. Transport mechanisms across the membrane are dependent on membrane structure and concentration gradients.

Grade: 12
Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells are the fundamental structural and functional units of all living organisms. Cells take highly varied forms in different plants, animals, and microorganisms. Structural variations among cells determine the function each cell performs.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that cells have distinct and separate structures (organelles) which perform and monitor processes essential for survival of the cell (e.g., energy production, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules, storage of genetic material). The highly specific function of each organelle is directly related to its structure.

Structure/Function Relationship: Students should know that the cell membrane defines the boundary of the cell and regulates the passage of materials into and out of the cell. Transport mechanisms across the membrane are dependent on membrane structure and concentration gradients.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Florida  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

The student critically analyzes specific elements of mass media with regard to the extent to which they enhance or manipulate information.

Grade: 10
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

The student critically analyzes specific elements of mass media with regard to the extent to which they enhance or manipulate information.

Grade: 11
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

The student critically analyzes specific elements of mass media with regard to the extent to which they enhance or manipulate information.

Grade: 12
The student selects and uses appropriate listening strategies according to the intended purpose, such as solving problems, interpreting and evaluating the techniques and intent of a presentation, and taking action in career-related situations.

The student describes, evaluates, and expands personal preferences in listening to fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and informational presentations.

The student determines main concept and supporting details in order to analyze and evaluate nonprint media messages.

The student critically analyzes specific elements of mass media with regard to the extent to which they enhance or manipulate information.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student knows that complex interactions among the different kinds of molecules in the cell cause distinct cycles of activity governed by proteins.

The student knows that cell behavior can be affected by molecules from other parts of the organism or even from other organisms.

The student knows that the chemical elements that make up the molecules of living things are combined and recombined in different ways.

The student knows that changes in a component of an ecosystem will have unpredictable effects on the entire system but that the components of the system tend to react in a way that will restore the ecosystem to its original condition.

Grade: 10
The student knows that complex interactions among the different kinds of molecules in the cell cause distinct cycles of activity governed by proteins.

The student knows that cell behavior can be affected by molecules from other parts of the organism or even from other organisms.

The student knows that the chemical elements that make up the molecules of living things are combined and recombined in different ways.

Grade: 11
The student knows that cell behavior can be affected by molecules from other parts of the organism or even from other organisms.

The student understands the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproduction and knows the different genetic advantages and disadvantages of asexual and sexual reproduction.

The student knows that the chemical elements that make up the molecules of living things are combined and recombined in different ways.

Grade: 12
The student knows that cell behavior can be affected by molecules from other parts of the organism or even from other organisms.

The student knows that the chemical elements that make up the molecules of living things are combined and recombined in different ways.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Georgia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

When responding to written and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student assesses the ways language and delivery affect the mood and tone of the oral communication and impact the audience.

When responding to written and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by authority, emotion, and logic.

When responding to written and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student formulates judgments about ideas under discussion and supports those judgments with convincing evidence.

When responding to written and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student develops and applies criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the presentation, style, and content of films and other forms of electronic communication.

When responding to written and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student identifies the aesthetic effects of a media presentation (e.g., layout, lighting, color, camera angles, background, etc.).

Grade: 10
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student analyzes historically significant speeches to find the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student evaluates the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, diction, and syntax.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student analyzes the types of arguments used by the speaker, including argument by causation, analogy, authority, emotion, and logic.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student identifies logical fallacies used in oral addresses (e.g., attack ad hominem, false causality, red herring, overgeneralization, bandwagon effect).

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student analyzes the four basic types of persuasive speech (e.g., propositions of fact, value, problem, or policy) and understands the similarities and differences in their patterns of organization and the use of persuasive language, reasoning, and proof.

Grade: 11
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student analyzes visual or aural techniques used in a media message for a particular audience and evaluates their effectiveness.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student develops and applies criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the presentation, style, and content of films and other forms of electronic communication.

When delivering and responding to presentations, the student evaluates and uses different effects (e.g., visual, music, sound, graphics) to create competent presentations or productions.

Grade: 12
Responds to questions with appropriate information.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student identifies and evaluates the effect of media on the production and consumption of personal and societal values.

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student interprets and evaluates the various ways in which local, national, and international events are presented and the ways information is communicated by visual image makers (e.g., graphic artists, documentary filmmakers, illustrators, news photographers).

When responding to visual and oral texts and media (e.g., television, radio, film productions, and electronic media), the student critiques a speaker's diction and syntax in relation to the purpose of an oral communication and the impact the words may have on the audience.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe solutions in terms of solute/solvent, conductivity, concentration

Observe factors affecting the rate a solute dissolves in a specific solvent.

Demonstrate that solubility is related to temperature by constructing a solubility curve.

Demonstrate appropriate technique in all laboratory situations.

Explain the role of cell organelles for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including the cell membrane, in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction.

Explain the process of dissolving in terms of solute/solvent interactions: Observe factors that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves in a specific solvent, express concentrations as molarities, prepare and properly label solutions of specified molar concentration, Relate molality to colligative properties.

Grade: 10
Describe solutions in terms of solute/solvent, conductivity, concentration

Observe factors affecting the rate a solute dissolves in a specific solvent.

Demonstrate that solubility is related to temperature by constructing a solubility curve.

Demonstrate appropriate technique in all laboratory situations.

Explain the role of cell organelles for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including the cell membrane, in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction.

Explain the process of dissolving in terms of solute/solvent interactions: Observe factors that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves in a specific solvent, express concentrations as molarities, prepare and properly label solutions of specified molar concentration, Relate molality to colligative properties.

Grade: 11
Describe solutions in terms of solute/solvent, conductivity, concentration

Observe factors affecting the rate a solute dissolves in a specific solvent.

Demonstrate that solubility is related to temperature by constructing a solubility curve.

Demonstrate appropriate technique in all laboratory situations.

Explain the role of cell organelles for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including the cell membrane, in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction.

Explain the process of dissolving in terms of solute/solvent interactions: Observe factors that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves in a specific solvent, express concentrations as molarities, prepare and properly label solutions of specified molar concentration, Relate molality to colligative properties.

Grade: 12
Describe solutions in terms of solute/solvent, conductivity, concentration

Observe factors affecting the rate a solute dissolves in a specific solvent.

Demonstrate that solubility is related to temperature by constructing a solubility curve.

Demonstrate appropriate technique in all laboratory situations.

Explain the role of cell organelles for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including the cell membrane, in maintaining homeostasis and cell reproduction.

Explain the process of dissolving in terms of solute/solvent interactions: Observe factors that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves in a specific solvent, express concentrations as molarities, prepare and properly label solutions of specified molar concentration, Relate molality to colligative properties.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Hawaii  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Grade: 10
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Grade: 11
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Grade: 12
The student listens critically by assessing patterns of reasoning, soundness of evidence, and validity of arguments.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student compares and contrasts various types of cells and relate the structure of each kind of cell to its function.

The student describes and explains the structure and function of the various cell parts.

Grade: 10
The student compares and contrasts various types of cells and relate the structure of each kind of cell to its function.

The student describes and explains the structure and function of the various cell parts.

Grade: 11
The student compares and contrasts various types of cells and relate the structure of each kind of cell to its function.

The student describes and explains the structure and function of the various cell parts.

Grade: 12
The student compares and contrasts various types of cells and relate the structure of each kind of cell to its function.

The student describes and explains the structure and function of the various cell parts.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Idaho  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 10
Acquire, interpret, and apply information from a variety of electronic or live sources.

Use listening skills to gain enrichment and information about various cultures.

Demonstrate effective interpersonal listening skills.

Make informed judgments about the purpose, content, organization, and delivery of verbal communications and non-verbal cues.

Make judgments about non-print media.

Grade: 11
Acquire, interpret, and apply information from a variety of electronic or live sources.

Use listening skills to gain enrichment and information about various cultures.

Demonstrate effective interpersonal listening skills.

Make informed judgments about the purpose, content, organization, and delivery of verbal communications and non-verbal cues.

Make judgments about non-print media.

Grade: 12
Acquire, interpret, and apply information from a variety of electronic or live sources.

Use listening skills to gain enrichment and information about various cultures.

Demonstrate effective interpersonal listening skills.

Make informed judgments about the purpose, content, organization, and delivery of verbal communications and non-verbal cues.

Make judgments about non-print media.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Know that cells have particular structures that underlie their functions.

Know that most cell functions involve chemical reactions.

Trace how matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization of living systems - cells, organs, organisms, communities - and between living systems and the physical environment.

Grade: 10
Know that cells have particular structures that underlie their functions.

Know that most cell functions involve chemical reactions.

Trace how matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization of living systems - cells, organs, organisms, communities - and between living systems and the physical environment.

Grade: 11
Know that cells have particular structures that underlie their functions.

Know that most cell functions involve chemical reactions.

Trace how matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization of living systems - cells, organs, organisms, communities - and between living systems and the physical environment.

Grade: 12
Know that cells have particular structures that underlie their functions.

Know that most cell functions involve chemical reactions.

Trace how matter cycles and energy flows through different levels of organization of living systems - cells, organs, organisms, communities - and between living systems and the physical environment.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Illinois  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Apply listening skills as individuals and members of a group in a variety of settings (e.g., lectures, discussions, conversations, team projects, presentations, interviews).

Apply listening skills in practical settings (e.g., classroom note taking, interpersonal conflict situations, giving and receiving directions, evaluating persuasive messages).

Demonstrate understanding of the relationship of verbal and nonverbal messages within a context (e.g., contradictory, supportive, repetitive, substitutive).

Grade: 10
Apply listening skills as individuals and members of a group in a variety of settings (e.g., lectures, discussions, conversations, team projects, presentations, interviews).

Apply listening skills in practical settings (e.g., classroom note taking, interpersonal conflict situations, giving and receiving directions, evaluating persuasive messages).

Demonstrate understanding of the relationship of verbal and nonverbal messages within a context (e.g., contradictory, supportive, repetitive, substitutive).

Grade: 11
Use techniques for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of oral messages.

Use speaking skills to participate in and lead group discussions; analyze the effectiveness of the spoken interactions based upon the ability of the group to achieve its goals.

Grade: 12
Use techniques for analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of oral messages.

Use speaking skills to participate in and lead group discussions; analyze the effectiveness of the spoken interactions based upon the ability of the group to achieve its goals.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain how genetic combinations produce visible effects and variations among physical features and cellular functions of organisms.

Describe the structures and organization of cells and tissues that underlie basic life functions including nutrition, respiration, cellular transport, biosynthesis and reproduction.

Grade: 10
Explain how genetic combinations produce visible effects and variations among physical features and cellular functions of organisms.

Describe the structures and organization of cells and tissues that underlie basic life functions including nutrition, respiration, cellular transport, biosynthesis and reproduction.

Grade: 11
Explain changes within cells and organisms in response to stimuli and changing environmental conditions (e.g., homeostasis, dormancy).

Grade: 12
Explain changes within cells and organisms in response to stimuli and changing environmental conditions (e.g., homeostasis, dormancy).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Indiana  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Comprehension: Summarize a speaker's purpose and point of view and ask questions concerning the speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Make judgments about the ideas under discussion and support those judgments with convincing evidence.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze historically significant speeches (such as Abraham Lincoln's 'House Divided' speech or Winston Churchill's 'We Will Never Surrender' speech) to find the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, choice of words, and use of language.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify the artistic effects of a media presentation and evaluate the techniques used to create them (comparing, for example, Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet with Franco Zefferelli's film version).

Grade: 10
Comprehension: Summarize a speaker's purpose and point of view and ask questions concerning the speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Make judgments about the ideas under discussion and support those judgments with convincing evidence.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze historically significant speeches (such as Franklin Delano Roosevelt's 'Day of Infamy' speech) to find the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, choice of words, and use of language.

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Identify the artistic effects of a media presentation and evaluate the techniques used to create them (for example, compare Shakespeare's Henry V with Kenneth Branagh's 1990 film version).

Grade: 11
Organization and Delivery of Oral Communication: Distinguish between and use various forms of logical arguments, including: Inductive arguments (arguments that are highly likely, such as All of these pears are from that basket and all of these pears are ripe, so all of the pears in the basket are ripe) and deductive arguments (arguments that are necessary conclusions based on the evidence, such as If all men are mortal and he is a man, then he is mortal); Syllogisms and analogies (assumptions that if two things are similar in some ways then they are probably similar in others).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze strategies used by the media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture (including advertisements; perpetuation of stereotypes; and the use of visual representations, special effects, and language).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Interpret and evaluate the various ways in which events are presented and information is communicated by visual image-makers (such as graphic artists, documentary filmmakers, illustrators, and news photographers).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze the techniques used in media messages for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness (for example, Orson Welles' radio broadcast War of the Worlds).

Grade: 12
Organization and Delivery of Oral Communication: Distinguish between and use various forms of logical arguments, including: Inductive arguments (arguments that are highly likely, such as All of these pears are from that basket and all of these pears are ripe, so all of the pears in the basket are ripe) and deductive arguments (arguments that are necessary conclusions based on the evidence, such as If all men are mortal and he is a man, then he is mortal); Syllogisms and analogies (assumptions that if two things are similar in some ways then they are probably similar in others).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze strategies used by the media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture (including advertisements; perpetuation of stereotypes; and the use of visual representations, special effects, and language).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Interpret and evaluate the various ways in which events are presented and information is communicated by visual image-makers (such as graphic artists, documentary filmmakers, illustrators, and news photographers).

Analysis and Evaluation of Oral and Media Communications: Analyze the techniques used in media messages for a particular audience to evaluate effectiveness, and infer the speaker's character (using, for example, the Duke of Windsor's abdication speech).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Molecules and Cells: Recognize that and explain how the many cells in an individual can be very different from one another, even though they are all descended from a single cell and thus have essentially identical genetic instructions. Understand that different parts of the genetic instructions are used in different types of cells and are influenced by the cell's environment and past history.

Molecules and Cells: Explain that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. Recognize that in all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape. In addition, understand that flagella and/or cilia may allow some Protista, some Monera, and some animal cells to move.

Molecules and Cells: Know and describe that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, understand that most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Molecules and Cells: Understand and describe that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids.

Molecules and Cells: Demonstrate that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. Note that extreme changes may harm cells, modifying the structure of their protein molecules and therefore, some possible functions.

Molecules and Cells: Show that a living cell is composed mainly of a small number of chemical elements (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur). Recognize that carbon can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Compare and contrast the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that some structures in the modern eukaryotic cell developed from early prokaryotes, such as mitochondria, and in plants, chloroplasts.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Recognize and explain that communication and/or interaction are required between cells to coordinate their diverse activities.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Understand that and describe how the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment is required for the continuation of life and explain how stability is challenged by changing physical, chemical, and environmental conditions, as well as the presence of disease agents.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that the regulatory and behavioral responses of an organism to external stimuli occur in order to maintain both short- and long-term equilibrium.

Evolution: Describe how life on Earth is thought to have begun as simple, one-celled organisms about 4 billion years ago. Note that during the first 2 billion years, only single-cell microorganisms existed, but once cells with nuclei developed about a billion years ago, increasingly complex multicellular organisms evolved.

Ecology: Describe how ecosystems can be reasonably stable over hundreds or thousands of years. Understand that if a disaster such as flood or fire occurs, the damaged ecosystem is likely to recover in stages that eventually result in a system similar to the original one.

Ecology: Understand and explain that like many complex systems, ecosystems tend to have cyclic fluctuations around a state of rough equilibrium. However, also understand that ecosystems can always change with climate changes or when one or more new species appear as a result of migration or local evolution.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in terms of their degree of saturation.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in appropriate concentration units (be able to calculate these units) such as molarity, percent by mass or volume, parts per million (ppm), or parts per billion (ppb).

The Nature of Chemical Change: Perform calculations that demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between molarity, volume, and number of moles of a solute in a solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Prepare a specified volume of a solution of given molarity.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Use titration data to calculate the concentration of an unknown solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Predict how a reaction rate will be quantitatively affected by changes of concentration.

Explain how Arrhenius's discovery of the nature of ionic solutions contributed to the understanding of a broad class of chemical reactions.

Environmental Systems: Recognize and describe the difference between systems in equilibrium and systems in disequilibrium.

Grade: 10
Molecules and Cells: Recognize that and explain how the many cells in an individual can be very different from one another, even though they are all descended from a single cell and thus have essentially identical genetic instructions. Understand that different parts of the genetic instructions are used in different types of cells and are influenced by the cell's environment and past history.

Molecules and Cells: Explain that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. Recognize that in all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape. In addition, understand that flagella and/or cilia may allow some Protista, some Monera, and some animal cells to move.

Molecules and Cells: Know and describe that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, understand that most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Molecules and Cells: Understand and describe that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids.

Molecules and Cells: Demonstrate that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. Note that extreme changes may harm cells, modifying the structure of their protein molecules and therefore, some possible functions.

Molecules and Cells: Show that a living cell is composed mainly of a small number of chemical elements (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur). Recognize that carbon can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Compare and contrast the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that some structures in the modern eukaryotic cell developed from early prokaryotes, such as mitochondria, and in plants, chloroplasts.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Recognize and explain that communication and/or interaction are required between cells to coordinate their diverse activities.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Understand that and describe how the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment is required for the continuation of life and explain how stability is challenged by changing physical, chemical, and environmental conditions, as well as the presence of disease agents.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that the regulatory and behavioral responses of an organism to external stimuli occur in order to maintain both short- and long-term equilibrium.

Evolution: Describe how life on Earth is thought to have begun as simple, one-celled organisms about 4 billion years ago. Note that during the first 2 billion years, only single-cell microorganisms existed, but once cells with nuclei developed about a billion years ago, increasingly complex multicellular organisms evolved.

Ecology: Describe how ecosystems can be reasonably stable over hundreds or thousands of years. Understand that if a disaster such as flood or fire occurs, the damaged ecosystem is likely to recover in stages that eventually result in a system similar to the original one.

Ecology: Understand and explain that like many complex systems, ecosystems tend to have cyclic fluctuations around a state of rough equilibrium. However, also understand that ecosystems can always change with climate changes or when one or more new species appear as a result of migration or local evolution.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in terms of their degree of saturation.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in appropriate concentration units (be able to calculate these units) such as molarity, percent by mass or volume, parts per million (ppm), or parts per billion (ppb).

The Nature of Chemical Change: Perform calculations that demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between molarity, volume, and number of moles of a solute in a solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Prepare a specified volume of a solution of given molarity.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Use titration data to calculate the concentration of an unknown solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Predict how a reaction rate will be quantitatively affected by changes of concentration.

Explain how Arrhenius's discovery of the nature of ionic solutions contributed to the understanding of a broad class of chemical reactions.

Environmental Systems: Recognize and describe the difference between systems in equilibrium and systems in disequilibrium.

Grade: 11
Molecules and Cells: Recognize that and explain how the many cells in an individual can be very different from one another, even though they are all descended from a single cell and thus have essentially identical genetic instructions. Understand that different parts of the genetic instructions are used in different types of cells and are influenced by the cell's environment and past history.

Molecules and Cells: Explain that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. Recognize that in all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape. In addition, understand that flagella and/or cilia may allow some Protista, some Monera, and some animal cells to move.

Molecules and Cells: Know and describe that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, understand that most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Molecules and Cells: Understand and describe that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids.

Molecules and Cells: Demonstrate that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. Note that extreme changes may harm cells, modifying the structure of their protein molecules and therefore, some possible functions.

Molecules and Cells: Show that a living cell is composed mainly of a small number of chemical elements (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur). Recognize that carbon can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Compare and contrast the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that some structures in the modern eukaryotic cell developed from early prokaryotes, such as mitochondria, and in plants, chloroplasts.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Recognize and explain that communication and/or interaction are required between cells to coordinate their diverse activities.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Understand that and describe how the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment is required for the continuation of life and explain how stability is challenged by changing physical, chemical, and environmental conditions, as well as the presence of disease agents.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that the regulatory and behavioral responses of an organism to external stimuli occur in order to maintain both short- and long-term equilibrium.

Evolution: Describe how life on Earth is thought to have begun as simple, one-celled organisms about 4 billion years ago. Note that during the first 2 billion years, only single-cell microorganisms existed, but once cells with nuclei developed about a billion years ago, increasingly complex multicellular organisms evolved.

Ecology: Describe how ecosystems can be reasonably stable over hundreds or thousands of years. Understand that if a disaster such as flood or fire occurs, the damaged ecosystem is likely to recover in stages that eventually result in a system similar to the original one.

Ecology: Understand and explain that like many complex systems, ecosystems tend to have cyclic fluctuations around a state of rough equilibrium. However, also understand that ecosystems can always change with climate changes or when one or more new species appear as a result of migration or local evolution.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in terms of their degree of saturation.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in appropriate concentration units (be able to calculate these units) such as molarity, percent by mass or volume, parts per million (ppm), or parts per billion (ppb).

The Nature of Chemical Change: Perform calculations that demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between molarity, volume, and number of moles of a solute in a solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Prepare a specified volume of a solution of given molarity.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Use titration data to calculate the concentration of an unknown solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Predict how a reaction rate will be quantitatively affected by changes of concentration.

Explain how Arrhenius's discovery of the nature of ionic solutions contributed to the understanding of a broad class of chemical reactions.

Environmental Systems: Recognize and describe the difference between systems in equilibrium and systems in disequilibrium.

Grade: 12
Molecules and Cells: Recognize that and explain how the many cells in an individual can be very different from one another, even though they are all descended from a single cell and thus have essentially identical genetic instructions. Understand that different parts of the genetic instructions are used in different types of cells and are influenced by the cell's environment and past history.

Molecules and Cells: Explain that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. Recognize that in all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape. In addition, understand that flagella and/or cilia may allow some Protista, some Monera, and some animal cells to move.

Molecules and Cells: Know and describe that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, understand that most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Molecules and Cells: Understand and describe that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids.

Molecules and Cells: Demonstrate that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. Note that extreme changes may harm cells, modifying the structure of their protein molecules and therefore, some possible functions.

Molecules and Cells: Show that a living cell is composed mainly of a small number of chemical elements (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur). Recognize that carbon can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Compare and contrast the form and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that some structures in the modern eukaryotic cell developed from early prokaryotes, such as mitochondria, and in plants, chloroplasts.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Recognize and explain that communication and/or interaction are required between cells to coordinate their diverse activities.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Understand that and describe how the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment is required for the continuation of life and explain how stability is challenged by changing physical, chemical, and environmental conditions, as well as the presence of disease agents.

Developmental and Organismal Biology: Explain that the regulatory and behavioral responses of an organism to external stimuli occur in order to maintain both short- and long-term equilibrium.

Evolution: Describe how life on Earth is thought to have begun as simple, one-celled organisms about 4 billion years ago. Note that during the first 2 billion years, only single-cell microorganisms existed, but once cells with nuclei developed about a billion years ago, increasingly complex multicellular organisms evolved.

Ecology: Describe how ecosystems can be reasonably stable over hundreds or thousands of years. Understand that if a disaster such as flood or fire occurs, the damaged ecosystem is likely to recover in stages that eventually result in a system similar to the original one.

Ecology: Understand and explain that like many complex systems, ecosystems tend to have cyclic fluctuations around a state of rough equilibrium. However, also understand that ecosystems can always change with climate changes or when one or more new species appear as a result of migration or local evolution.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in terms of their degree of saturation.

Properties of Matter: Describe solutions in appropriate concentration units (be able to calculate these units) such as molarity, percent by mass or volume, parts per million (ppm), or parts per billion (ppb).

The Nature of Chemical Change: Perform calculations that demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between molarity, volume, and number of moles of a solute in a solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Prepare a specified volume of a solution of given molarity.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Use titration data to calculate the concentration of an unknown solution.

The Nature of Chemical Change: Predict how a reaction rate will be quantitatively affected by changes of concentration.

Explain how Arrhenius's discovery of the nature of ionic solutions contributed to the understanding of a broad class of chemical reactions.

Environmental Systems: Recognize and describe the difference between systems in equilibrium and systems in disequilibrium.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Modern Languages: Access identified media from the foreign culture to gain information and to identify a cultural perspective different from students' own viewpoint.

Latin: Use authentic sources to acquire and apply information and to explore the perspectives of the Roman culture.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Modern Languages: Access identified media from the foreign culture to gain information and to identify a cultural perspective different from students' own viewpoint.

Latin: Use authentic sources to acquire and apply information and to explore the perspectives of the Roman culture.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Modern Languages: Access identified media from the foreign culture to gain information and to identify a cultural perspective different from students' own viewpoint.

Latin: Use authentic sources to acquire and apply information and to explore the perspectives of the Roman culture.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Modern Languages: Access identified media from the foreign culture to gain information and to identify a cultural perspective different from students' own viewpoint.

Latin: Use authentic sources to acquire and apply information and to explore the perspectives of the Roman culture.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Kansas  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will understand that cells are composed of a variety of specialized structures that carry out specific functions.

Students will understand that most cell functions involve specific chemical reactions.

Students will understand that cells can differentiate, thereby enabling complex multi-cellular organisms to form.

Grade: 10
Students will understand that cells are composed of a variety of specialized structures that carry out specific functions.

Students will understand that most cell functions involve specific chemical reactions.

Students will understand that cells can differentiate, thereby enabling complex multi-cellular organisms to form.

Grade: 11
Students will understand that cells are composed of a variety of specialized structures that carry out specific functions.

Students will understand that most cell functions involve specific chemical reactions.

Students will understand that cells can differentiate, thereby enabling complex multi-cellular organisms to form.

Grade: 12
Students will understand that cells are composed of a variety of specialized structures that carry out specific functions.

Students will understand that most cell functions involve specific chemical reactions.

Students will understand that cells can differentiate, thereby enabling complex multi-cellular organisms to form.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Kentucky  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Cells have particular structures that underlie their function. Every cell is surrounded by a membrane that separates it from the outside world. Inside the cell is a concentrated mixture of thousands of different molecules that form a variety of specialized structures. These structures carry out specific cell functions.

Most cell functions involve chemical reactions. Food molecules taken into cells react to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Both breakdown and synthesis are made possible by a large set of protein catalysts, called enzymes. The breakdown of some of the food molecules enables the cell to store energy in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell.

Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

Plant cells contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. Plants and many microorganisms (e.g., Euglena) use solar energy to combine molecules of carbon dioxide and water into complex, energy-rich organic compounds and release oxygen to the environment. This process of photosynthesis provides a vital link between the Sun and energy needs of living systems.

In the development of multicellular organisms, cells multiply and differentiate to form many specialized cells, tissues, and organs. This differentiation is regulated through the expression of different genes.

Multicellular animals have nervous systems that generate behavior. Nerve cells communicate with each other by secreting specific molecules. Specialized cells in sense organs detect light, sound, and specific chemicals enabling animals to monitor what is going on in the world around them.

The chemical bonds of food molecules contain energy. Energy is released when the bonds of food molecules are broken and new compounds with lower energy bonds are formed. Cells usually store this energy temporarily in the phosphate bonds of ATP. During the process of cellular respiration, some energy is lost as heat.

Grade: 10
Cells have particular structures that underlie their function. Every cell is surrounded by a membrane that separates it from the outside world. Inside the cell is a concentrated mixture of thousands of different molecules that form a variety of specialized structures. These structures carry out specific cell functions.

Most cell functions involve chemical reactions. Food molecules taken into cells react to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Both breakdown and synthesis are made possible by a large set of protein catalysts, called enzymes. The breakdown of some of the food molecules enables the cell to store energy in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell.

Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

Plant cells contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. Plants and many microorganisms (e.g., Euglena) use solar energy to combine molecules of carbon dioxide and water into complex, energy-rich organic compounds and release oxygen to the environment. This process of photosynthesis provides a vital link between the Sun and energy needs of living systems.

In the development of multicellular organisms, cells multiply and differentiate to form many specialized cells, tissues, and organs. This differentiation is regulated through the expression of different genes.

Multicellular animals have nervous systems that generate behavior. Nerve cells communicate with each other by secreting specific molecules. Specialized cells in sense organs detect light, sound, and specific chemicals enabling animals to monitor what is going on in the world around them.

The chemical bonds of food molecules contain energy. Energy is released when the bonds of food molecules are broken and new compounds with lower energy bonds are formed. Cells usually store this energy temporarily in the phosphate bonds of ATP. During the process of cellular respiration, some energy is lost as heat.

Grade: 11
Cells have particular structures that underlie their function. Every cell is surrounded by a membrane that separates it from the outside world. Inside the cell is a concentrated mixture of thousands of different molecules that form a variety of specialized structures. These structures carry out specific cell functions.

Most cell functions involve chemical reactions. Food molecules taken into cells react to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Both breakdown and synthesis are made possible by a large set of protein catalysts, called enzymes. The breakdown of some of the food molecules enables the cell to store energy in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell.

Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

Plant cells contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. Plants and many microorganisms (e.g., Euglena) use solar energy to combine molecules of carbon dioxide and water into complex, energy-rich organic compounds and release oxygen to the environment. This process of photosynthesis provides a vital link between the Sun and energy needs of living systems.

In the development of multicellular organisms, cells multiply and differentiate to form many specialized cells, tissues, and organs. This differentiation is regulated through the expression of different genes.

Multicellular animals have nervous systems that generate behavior. Nerve cells communicate with each other by secreting specific molecules. Specialized cells in sense organs detect light, sound, and specific chemicals enabling animals to monitor what is going on in the world around them.

The chemical bonds of food molecules contain energy. Energy is released when the bonds of food molecules are broken and new compounds with lower energy bonds are formed. Cells usually store this energy temporarily in the phosphate bonds of ATP. During the process of cellular respiration, some energy is lost as heat.

Grade: 12
Cells have particular structures that underlie their function. Every cell is surrounded by a membrane that separates it from the outside world. Inside the cell is a concentrated mixture of thousands of different molecules that form a variety of specialized structures. These structures carry out specific cell functions.

Most cell functions involve chemical reactions. Food molecules taken into cells react to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Both breakdown and synthesis are made possible by a large set of protein catalysts, called enzymes. The breakdown of some of the food molecules enables the cell to store energy in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell.

Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

Plant cells contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. Plants and many microorganisms (e.g., Euglena) use solar energy to combine molecules of carbon dioxide and water into complex, energy-rich organic compounds and release oxygen to the environment. This process of photosynthesis provides a vital link between the Sun and energy needs of living systems.

In the development of multicellular organisms, cells multiply and differentiate to form many specialized cells, tissues, and organs. This differentiation is regulated through the expression of different genes.

Multicellular animals have nervous systems that generate behavior. Nerve cells communicate with each other by secreting specific molecules. Specialized cells in sense organs detect light, sound, and specific chemicals enabling animals to monitor what is going on in the world around them.

The chemical bonds of food molecules contain energy. Energy is released when the bonds of food molecules are broken and new compounds with lower energy bonds are formed. Cells usually store this energy temporarily in the phosphate bonds of ATP. During the process of cellular respiration, some energy is lost as heat.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Louisiana  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to oral instructions and presentations, speeches, discussions, and carry out procedures, including: taking accurate notes; writing summaries or responses; forming groups. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring messages for clarity; selecting and organizing essential information; noting cues such as changes in pace; generating and asking questions concerning a speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject. (ELA-4-H4)

Grade: 10
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex procedures, including: taking accurate notes; writing summaries or responses; forming groups. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring message for clarity; selecting and organizing essential information; noting cues such as changes in pace; generating and asking questions concerning a speaker's content, delivery, and attitude toward the subject. (ELA-4-H4)

Grade: 11
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex procedures, including: reading and questioning; writing responses; forming groups; taking accurate, detailed notes. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring messages for clarity; selecting and organizing information; noting cues such as changes in pace. (ELA-4-H4)

Grade: 12
Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Listen to detailed oral instructions and presentations and carry out complex procedures, including: reading and questioning; writing responses; forming groups; taking accurate, detailed notes. (ELA-4-H2)

Grade Level Expectation: Speaking and Listening: Use active listening strategies, including: monitoring messages for clarity; selecting and organizing information; noting cues such as changes in pace. (ELA-4-H4)

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The Cell: observing cells, identifying organelles, relating structure to function, and differentiating among cell types. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Cell: demonstrating a knowledge of cellular transport. (1, 3, 4)

Biological Evolution: comparing viruses to cells. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Matter, Energy, and Organization of Living Systems: recognizing the importance of the ATP cycle in energy usage within the cell. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Systems and the Behaviors of Organisms: identifying mechanisms involved in homeostasis. (1, 3, 4)

Grade: 10
The Cell: observing cells, identifying organelles, relating structure to function, and differentiating among cell types. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Cell: demonstrating a knowledge of cellular transport. (1, 3, 4)

Biological Evolution: comparing viruses to cells. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Matter, Energy, and Organization of Living Systems: recognizing the importance of the ATP cycle in energy usage within the cell. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Systems and the Behaviors of Organisms: identifying mechanisms involved in homeostasis. (1, 3, 4)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: The Cell: Identify and describe structural and functional differences among organelles (LS-H-A1)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: The Cell: Investigate and describe the role of enzymes in the function of a cell (LS-H-A1)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: The Cell: Compare active and passive cellular transport (LS-H-A2)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: The Cell: Analyze the movement of water across a cell membrane in hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic solutions (LS-H-A2)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: Biological Evolution: Compare the structures, functions, and cycles of viruses to those of cells (LS-H-C7)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: Matter, Energy, and Organization of Living Systems: Explain the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in a cell (LS-H-E2)

Grade Level Expectation: Biology: Systems and the Behavior of Organisms: Explain how body systems maintain homeostasis (LS-H-F2)

Grade: 11
Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: The Structure and Properties of Matter: Given the concentration of a solution, calculate the predicted change in its boiling and freezing points (PS-H-C3)

Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: The Structure and Properties of Matter: Predict the conductivity of a solution (PS-H-C3)

Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: The Structure and Properties of Matter: Express concentration in terms of molarity, molality, and normality (PS-H-C3)

Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: Chemical Reactions: Determine the concentration of an unknown acid or base by using data from a titration with a standard solution and an indicator (PS-H-D2)

The Cell: observing cells, identifying organelles, relating structure to function, and differentiating among cell types. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Cell: demonstrating a knowledge of cellular transport. (1, 3, 4)

Biological Evolution: comparing viruses to cells. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Matter, Energy, and Organization of Living Systems: recognizing the importance of the ATP cycle in energy usage within the cell. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Systems and the Behaviors of Organisms: identifying mechanisms involved in homeostasis. (1, 3, 4)

Grade: 12
Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: The Structure and Properties of Matter: Given the concentration of a solution, calculate the predicted change in its boiling and freezing points (PS-H-C3)

Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: The Structure and Properties of Matter: Predict the conductivity of a solution (PS-H-C3)

Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: The Structure and Properties of Matter: Express concentration in terms of molarity, molality, and normality (PS-H-C3)

Grade Level Expectation: Chemistry: Chemical Reactions: Determine the concentration of an unknown acid or base by using data from a titration with a standard solution and an indicator (PS-H-D2)

The Cell: observing cells, identifying organelles, relating structure to function, and differentiating among cell types. (1, 2, 3, 4)

The Cell: demonstrating a knowledge of cellular transport. (1, 3, 4)

Biological Evolution: comparing viruses to cells. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Matter, Energy, and Organization of Living Systems: recognizing the importance of the ATP cycle in energy usage within the cell. (1, 2, 3, 4)

Systems and the Behaviors of Organisms: identifying mechanisms involved in homeostasis. (1, 3, 4)

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Massachusetts  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Identify techniques used in television (animation, close-ups, wide-angle shots, sound effects, music, graphics) and use knowledge of these techniques to distinguish between facts and misleading information.

Analyze visual or aural techniques used in a media message for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness.

Use criteria to assess the effectiveness of media presentations.

Develop and apply criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the presentation, style, and content of films and other forms of electronic communication.

Grade: 10
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Identify techniques used in television (animation, close-ups, wide-angle shots, sound effects, music, graphics) and use knowledge of these techniques to distinguish between facts and misleading information.

Analyze visual or aural techniques used in a media message for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness.

Use criteria to assess the effectiveness of media presentations.

Develop and apply criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the presentation, style, and content of films and other forms of electronic communication.

Grade: 11
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Identify techniques used in television (animation, close-ups, wide-angle shots, sound effects, music, graphics) and use knowledge of these techniques to distinguish between facts and misleading information.

Analyze visual or aural techniques used in a media message for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness.

Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation and identify and evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Use criteria to assess the effectiveness of media presentations.

Develop and apply criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the presentation, style, and content of films and other forms of electronic communication.

Grade: 12
Gather relevant information for a research project or composition through interviews.

Integrate relevant information gathered from group discussions and interviews for reports.

Identify techniques used in television (animation, close-ups, wide-angle shots, sound effects, music, graphics) and use knowledge of these techniques to distinguish between facts and misleading information.

Analyze visual or aural techniques used in a media message for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness.

Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation and identify and evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Use criteria to assess the effectiveness of media presentations.

Develop and apply criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the presentation, style, and content of films and other forms of electronic communication.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Structure and Function of Cells: Relate cell parts/organelles to their functions.

Structure and Function of Cells: Differentiate between prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells, in terms of their general structures and degrees of complexity.

Structure and Function of Cells: Distinguish between plant and animal cells.

Structure and Function of Cells: Describe how cells function in a narrow range of physical conditions, such as temperature and pH, to perform life functions that help to maintain homeostasis.

Structure and Function of Cells: Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (diffusion, osmosis, and active transport).

Grade: 10
Structure and Function of Cells: Relate cell parts/organelles to their functions.

Structure and Function of Cells: Differentiate between prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells, in terms of their general structures and degrees of complexity.

Structure and Function of Cells: Distinguish between plant and animal cells.

Structure and Function of Cells: Describe how cells function in a narrow range of physical conditions, such as temperature and pH, to perform life functions that help to maintain homeostasis.

Structure and Function of Cells: Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (diffusion, osmosis, and active transport).

Grade: 11
Solutions: Describe the process by which solutes dissolve in solvents.

Solutions: Describe the dynamic equilibrium that occurs in saturated solutions.

Solutions: Calculate concentration in terms of molarity, molality, and percent by mass.

Solutions: Write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions in aqueous solutions.

Grade: 12
Solutions: Describe the process by which solutes dissolve in solvents.

Solutions: Describe the dynamic equilibrium that occurs in saturated solutions.

Solutions: Calculate concentration in terms of molarity, molality, and percent by mass.

Solutions: Write net ionic equations for precipitation reactions in aqueous solutions.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Using selected words, phrases, and expressions with no major repeated patterns of error, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and recombinations of learned words, phrases, and expressions, with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and fluid sentence-length and paragraph-length messages with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Using selected words, phrases, and expressions with no major repeated patterns of error, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and recombinations of learned words, phrases, and expressions, with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and fluid sentence-length and paragraph-length messages with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Using selected words, phrases, and expressions with no major repeated patterns of error, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and recombinations of learned words, phrases, and expressions, with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and fluid sentence-length and paragraph-length messages with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and fluid sentence-length, paragraph-length, and essay-length messages with some patterns of errors that do not interfere with meaning, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Using selected words, phrases, and expressions with no major repeated patterns of error, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and recombinations of learned words, phrases, and expressions, with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and fluid sentence-length and paragraph-length messages with frequency of errors proportionate to the complexity of the communicative task, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Using sentences, strings of sentences, and fluid sentence-length, paragraph-length, and essay-length messages with some patterns of errors that do not interfere with meaning, students will obtain information and knowledge related to other disciplines from sources in the target language.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Maryland  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

The student will explain the function of structures found in cellular and multicellular organisms (transportation of materials, waste disposal, movement, feedback, asexual and sexual reproduction, control of structures, capture and release of energy, protein synthesis).

The student will conclude that cells exist within a narrow range of environmental conditions and changes to that environment, either naturally occurring or induced, may cause death of the cell or organism (pH, temperature, light, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, radiation, toxins).

Cellular: Students describe the abnormal functioning in cell regulation, such as cancer, as it relates to cell growth, division, and response to environment.

The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

Grade: 10
The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

The student will explain the function of structures found in cellular and multicellular organisms (transportation of materials, waste disposal, movement, feedback, asexual and sexual reproduction, control of structures, capture and release of energy, protein synthesis).

The student will conclude that cells exist within a narrow range of environmental conditions and changes to that environment, either naturally occurring or induced, may cause death of the cell or organism (pH, temperature, light, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, radiation, toxins).

Cellular: Students describe the abnormal functioning in cell regulation, such as cancer, as it relates to cell growth, division, and response to environment.

The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

Grade: 11
The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

The student will explain the function of structures found in cellular and multicellular organisms (transportation of materials, waste disposal, movement, feedback, asexual and sexual reproduction, control of structures, capture and release of energy, protein synthesis).

The student will conclude that cells exist within a narrow range of environmental conditions and changes to that environment, either naturally occurring or induced, may cause death of the cell or organism (pH, temperature, light, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, radiation, toxins).

Cellular: Students describe the abnormal functioning in cell regulation, such as cancer, as it relates to cell growth, division, and response to environment.

The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

Grade: 12
The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

The student will explain the function of structures found in cellular and multicellular organisms (transportation of materials, waste disposal, movement, feedback, asexual and sexual reproduction, control of structures, capture and release of energy, protein synthesis).

The student will conclude that cells exist within a narrow range of environmental conditions and changes to that environment, either naturally occurring or induced, may cause death of the cell or organism (pH, temperature, light, water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, radiation, toxins).

Cellular: Students describe the abnormal functioning in cell regulation, such as cancer, as it relates to cell growth, division, and response to environment.

The student will be able to discuss factors involved in the regulation of chemical activity as part of a homeostatic mechanism (osmosis, temperature, pH, enzyme regulation).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Maine  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will be able to compare the process of photosynthesis and respiration, and describe the factors that effect them.

Students will be able to relate the parts of a cell to its function.

Grade: 10
Students will be able to compare the process of photosynthesis and respiration, and describe the factors that effect them.

Students will be able to relate the parts of a cell to its function.

Grade: 11
Students will be able to compare the process of photosynthesis and respiration, and describe the factors that effect them.

Students will be able to relate the parts of a cell to its function.

Grade: 12
Students will be able to compare the process of photosynthesis and respiration, and describe the factors that effect them.

Students will be able to relate the parts of a cell to its function.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Michigan  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Read and write fluently, speak confidently, listen and interact appropriately, view critically, and represent creatively. Examples include speaking publicly, demonstrating teamwork skills, debating formally, performing literature, and interviewing for employment.

Grade: 10
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Read and write fluently, speak confidently, listen and interact appropriately, view critically, and represent creatively. Examples include speaking publicly, demonstrating teamwork skills, debating formally, performing literature, and interviewing for employment.

Grade: 11
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Grade: 12
Consistently use strategies to regulate the effects of variables on the communication process. An example is designing a communication environment for maximum impact on the receiver.

Read and write fluently, speak confidently, listen and interact appropriately, view critically, and represent creatively. Examples include speaking publicly, demonstrating teamwork skills, debating formally, performing literature, and interviewing for employment.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain how multicellular organisms grow, based on how cells grow and reproduce.

Compare and contrast ways in which selected cells are specialized to carry out particular life functions.

Explain how living things maintain a stable internal environment.

Grade: 10
Explain how multicellular organisms grow, based on how cells grow and reproduce.

Compare and contrast ways in which selected cells are specialized to carry out particular life functions.

Explain how living things maintain a stable internal environment.

Grade: 11
Explain how multicellular organisms grow, based on how cells grow and reproduce.

Compare and contrast ways in which selected cells are specialized to carry out particular life functions.

Explain how living things maintain a stable internal environment.

Grade: 12
Explain how multicellular organisms grow, based on how cells grow and reproduce.

Compare and contrast ways in which selected cells are specialized to carry out particular life functions.

Explain how living things maintain a stable internal environment.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Minnesota  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Evaluate the accuracy and credibility of information found on Internet sites.

Evaluate the logic of reasoning in both print and non-print selections.

Determine whether the evidence in a selection is appropriate, adequate and accurate.

Make informed evaluations about television, radio, film productions, newspapers and magazines with regard to quality of production, accuracy of information, bias, purpose, message and audience.

Critically analyze the messages and points of view employed in different media, including advertising, news programs, web sites, and documentaries.

Critically analyze and evaluate the strategies employed in news broadcasts, documentaries, and web sites related to clarity, accuracy, effectiveness, bias and relevance of facts.

Demonstrate an understanding of ethics in mass communication and describe the characteristics of ethical and unethical behavior.

Grade: 10
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Evaluate the accuracy and credibility of information found on Internet sites.

Evaluate the logic of reasoning in both print and non-print selections.

Determine whether the evidence in a selection is appropriate, adequate and accurate.

Make informed evaluations about television, radio, film productions, newspapers and magazines with regard to quality of production, accuracy of information, bias, purpose, message and audience.

Critically analyze the messages and points of view employed in different media, including advertising, news programs, web sites, and documentaries.

Critically analyze and evaluate the strategies employed in news broadcasts, documentaries, and web sites related to clarity, accuracy, effectiveness, bias and relevance of facts.

Demonstrate an understanding of ethics in mass communication and describe the characteristics of ethical and unethical behavior.

Grade: 11
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Evaluate the accuracy and credibility of information found on Internet sites.

Evaluate the logic of reasoning in both print and non-print selections.

Determine whether the evidence in a selection is appropriate, adequate and accurate.

Make informed evaluations about television, radio, film productions, newspapers and magazines with regard to quality of production, accuracy of information, bias, purpose, message and audience.

Critically analyze the messages and points of view employed in different media, including advertising, news programs, web sites, and documentaries.

Critically analyze and evaluate the strategies employed in news broadcasts, documentaries, and web sites related to clarity, accuracy, effectiveness, bias and relevance of facts.

Demonstrate an understanding of ethics in mass communication and describe the characteristics of ethical and unethical behavior.

Grade: 12
Describe the role of communication in everyday situations (e.g., advertising, informal social, business, formal social, etc.)

Evaluate the accuracy and credibility of information found on Internet sites.

Evaluate the logic of reasoning in both print and non-print selections.

Determine whether the evidence in a selection is appropriate, adequate and accurate.

Make informed evaluations about television, radio, film productions, newspapers and magazines with regard to quality of production, accuracy of information, bias, purpose, message and audience.

Critically analyze the messages and points of view employed in different media, including advertising, news programs, web sites, and documentaries.

Critically analyze and evaluate the strategies employed in news broadcasts, documentaries, and web sites related to clarity, accuracy, effectiveness, bias and relevance of facts.

Demonstrate an understanding of ethics in mass communication and describe the characteristics of ethical and unethical behavior.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student will relate cellular structures to their functions.

The student will compare and contrast the structures found in typical plant, animal and bacterial cells.

The student will explain the role of the cell membrane as a highly selective barrier in diffusion, osmosis and active transport.

The student will differentiate between the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in terms of energy flow, reactants and products.

Grade: 10
The student will relate cellular structures to their functions.

The student will compare and contrast the structures found in typical plant, animal and bacterial cells.

The student will explain the role of the cell membrane as a highly selective barrier in diffusion, osmosis and active transport.

The student will differentiate between the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in terms of energy flow, reactants and products.

Grade: 11
The student will relate cellular structures to their functions.

The student will compare and contrast the structures found in typical plant, animal and bacterial cells.

The student will explain the role of the cell membrane as a highly selective barrier in diffusion, osmosis and active transport.

The student will differentiate between the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in terms of energy flow, reactants and products.

Grade: 12
The student will relate cellular structures to their functions.

The student will compare and contrast the structures found in typical plant, animal and bacterial cells.

The student will explain the role of the cell membrane as a highly selective barrier in diffusion, osmosis and active transport.

The student will differentiate between the processes of photosynthesis and respiration in terms of energy flow, reactants and products.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Missouri  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Media Messages: Analyze, describe and evaluate the elements of messages projected in various media (e.g., videos, pictures, web-sites, artwork, plays and/or news programs).

Grade: 10
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Media Messages: Analyze, describe and evaluate the elements of messages projected in various media (e.g., videos, pictures, web-sites, artwork, plays and/or news programs).

Grade: 11
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Media Messages: Analyze, describe and evaluate the elements of messages projected in various media (e.g., videos, pictures, web-sites, artwork, plays and/or news programs).

Grade: 12
Purpose for Listening: Listen for enjoyment, for information, for directions, critically to summarize and evaluate communications that inform, persuade and entertain, to evaluate own and others' effectiveness in presentations and group discussions, using provided criteria, to evaluate the validity and reliability of speaker's message.

Media Messages: Analyze, describe and evaluate the elements of messages projected in various media (e.g., videos, pictures, web-sites, artwork, plays and/or news programs).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to describe the components of the modern model of an atom and how they are related.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate, observe directly or indirectly, and communicate to others the basic life processes that take place at the cellular level.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to present perceptions and ideas explaining the process whereby DNA directs the synthesis of proteins from amino acids.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to design and conduct investigations to determine what factors affect the processes of photosynthesis, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to recognize and communicate logical relationships between general body conditions (such as fever or intoxication) and specific cellular processes.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to read and interpret representative examples of published primary articles discussing current research in the use of molecular similarities to determine degrees of kinship of organisms.

Grade: 10
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to describe the components of the modern model of an atom and how they are related.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate, observe directly or indirectly, and communicate to others the basic life processes that take place at the cellular level.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to present perceptions and ideas explaining the process whereby DNA directs the synthesis of proteins from amino acids.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to design and conduct investigations to determine what factors affect the processes of photosynthesis, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to recognize and communicate logical relationships between general body conditions (such as fever or intoxication) and specific cellular processes.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to read and interpret representative examples of published primary articles discussing current research in the use of molecular similarities to determine degrees of kinship of organisms.

Grade: 11
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to describe the components of the modern model of an atom and how they are related.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate, observe directly or indirectly, and communicate to others the basic life processes that take place at the cellular level.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to present perceptions and ideas explaining the process whereby DNA directs the synthesis of proteins from amino acids.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to design and conduct investigations to determine what factors affect the processes of photosynthesis, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to recognize and communicate logical relationships between general body conditions (such as fever or intoxication) and specific cellular processes.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to read and interpret representative examples of published primary articles discussing current research in the use of molecular similarities to determine degrees of kinship of organisms.

Grade: 12
By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to describe the components of the modern model of an atom and how they are related.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to investigate, observe directly or indirectly, and communicate to others the basic life processes that take place at the cellular level.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to present perceptions and ideas explaining the process whereby DNA directs the synthesis of proteins from amino acids.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to design and conduct investigations to determine what factors affect the processes of photosynthesis, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to recognize and communicate logical relationships between general body conditions (such as fever or intoxication) and specific cellular processes.

By the end of grade 12, all students should be able to read and interpret representative examples of published primary articles discussing current research in the use of molecular similarities to determine degrees of kinship of organisms.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Mississippi  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Grade: 10
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Grade: 11
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Grade: 12
Identify the responsibilities of an effective listener.

Demonstrate listening skills.

Listen accurately, appreciatively, and critically.

Listens to and comprehends oral reading.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Relate cell membrane structure to its function in passive and active transport.

Relate chemical structure and characteristics of organic compounds to cell and organism functions.

Differentiate between elements, compounds, solutions, and mixtures.

Determine the factors affecting rates of solutions.

Classify a material as element, compound, solution or heterogeneous mixture.

Describe solutions in terms of solute and solvent; electrolyte or non-electrolyte; soluble or insoluble; unsaturated, saturated or supersaturated; miscible or immiscible.

Express the concentration of a solution as percent by mass, molarity, molality, and mole fraction, given appropriate data.

Describe how to make a solution of given molarity in terms of mass needed, or vice-versa.

Describe how to dilute a solution in terms of molarity and volume.

Classify species in aqueous solutions according to Arrhenius and Bronsted definitions, respectively.

Calculate the pH or pOH from the hydrogen or hydroxide ion concentrations of solutions and vice versa.

Represent reactions in aqueous solution with net ionic equations.

Contrast the relative entropy of a pure substance to the substance in solution.

Draw a schematic diagram (sketch) for an electrochemical cell, given an oxidation-reduction reaction that occurs in an aqueous solution.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Define the terms: anatomy, physiology, and homeostasis; explain the importance of the interaction between structure and function of organs and organ systems in the human body.

Explain the importance of water to body homeostasis.

Describe the structure and function of the components of a typical animal cell, including membranous and non-membranous organelles.

Relate plasma membrane structure to active and passive transport mechanisms.

Demonstrate knowledge of safety rules before working in the laboratory and model all safety rules in each lab activity.

Distinguish between plant and animal eukaryotic cell structures.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Describe the structure and function of a selectively permeable membrane and its role in diffusion and osmosis.

Demonstrate the proper use and care for scientific equipment used in the laboratory.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Explore the subcellular organelles responsible for protein synthesis and reproduction.

Acquire the skills necessary to set up, operate, and interpret the results from the use of the laboratory spectrophotometer.

Determine quantitatively the concentration of a solute in a solution, using the spectrophotometer.

Utilize the process of paper chromatography to identify the components of a chemical mixture.

Describe the chemical reactions essential to determination of protein concentrations in a solution through use of the Lowry method.

Prepare a series of protein concentrations using accurate and safe pipetting techniques.

Practice preparation of sample organic compounds, including methane, ethane, acetic acid, ethyl ethanoate, and methanol.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structures and functions of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structure and function of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Identify the major organelles, their structures and functions.

Determine the role of pigments.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Grade: 10
Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Relate cell membrane structure to its function in passive and active transport.

Relate chemical structure and characteristics of organic compounds to cell and organism functions.

Differentiate between elements, compounds, solutions, and mixtures.

Determine the factors affecting rates of solutions.

Classify a material as element, compound, solution or heterogeneous mixture.

Describe solutions in terms of solute and solvent; electrolyte or non-electrolyte; soluble or insoluble; unsaturated, saturated or supersaturated; miscible or immiscible.

Express the concentration of a solution as percent by mass, molarity, molality, and mole fraction, given appropriate data.

Describe how to make a solution of given molarity in terms of mass needed, or vice-versa.

Describe how to dilute a solution in terms of molarity and volume.

Classify species in aqueous solutions according to Arrhenius and Bronsted definitions, respectively.

Calculate the pH or pOH from the hydrogen or hydroxide ion concentrations of solutions and vice versa.

Represent reactions in aqueous solution with net ionic equations.

Contrast the relative entropy of a pure substance to the substance in solution.

Draw a schematic diagram (sketch) for an electrochemical cell, given an oxidation-reduction reaction that occurs in an aqueous solution.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Define the terms: anatomy, physiology, and homeostasis; explain the importance of the interaction between structure and function of organs and organ systems in the human body.

Explain the importance of water to body homeostasis.

Describe the structure and function of the components of a typical animal cell, including membranous and non-membranous organelles.

Relate plasma membrane structure to active and passive transport mechanisms.

Demonstrate knowledge of safety rules before working in the laboratory and model all safety rules in each lab activity.

Distinguish between plant and animal eukaryotic cell structures.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Describe the structure and function of a selectively permeable membrane and its role in diffusion and osmosis.

Demonstrate the proper use and care for scientific equipment used in the laboratory.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Explore the subcellular organelles responsible for protein synthesis and reproduction.

Acquire the skills necessary to set up, operate, and interpret the results from the use of the laboratory spectrophotometer.

Determine quantitatively the concentration of a solute in a solution, using the spectrophotometer.

Utilize the process of paper chromatography to identify the components of a chemical mixture.

Describe the chemical reactions essential to determination of protein concentrations in a solution through use of the Lowry method.

Prepare a series of protein concentrations using accurate and safe pipetting techniques.

Practice preparation of sample organic compounds, including methane, ethane, acetic acid, ethyl ethanoate, and methanol.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structures and functions of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structure and function of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Identify the major organelles, their structures and functions.

Determine the role of pigments.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Grade: 11
Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Relate cell membrane structure to its function in passive and active transport.

Relate chemical structure and characteristics of organic compounds to cell and organism functions.

Differentiate between elements, compounds, solutions, and mixtures.

Determine the factors affecting rates of solutions.

Classify a material as element, compound, solution or heterogeneous mixture.

Describe solutions in terms of solute and solvent; electrolyte or non-electrolyte; soluble or insoluble; unsaturated, saturated or supersaturated; miscible or immiscible.

Express the concentration of a solution as percent by mass, molarity, molality, and mole fraction, given appropriate data.

Describe how to make a solution of given molarity in terms of mass needed, or vice-versa.

Describe how to dilute a solution in terms of molarity and volume.

Classify species in aqueous solutions according to Arrhenius and Bronsted definitions, respectively.

Calculate the pH or pOH from the hydrogen or hydroxide ion concentrations of solutions and vice versa.

Represent reactions in aqueous solution with net ionic equations.

Contrast the relative entropy of a pure substance to the substance in solution.

Draw a schematic diagram (sketch) for an electrochemical cell, given an oxidation-reduction reaction that occurs in an aqueous solution.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Define the terms: anatomy, physiology, and homeostasis; explain the importance of the interaction between structure and function of organs and organ systems in the human body.

Explain the importance of water to body homeostasis.

Describe the structure and function of the components of a typical animal cell, including membranous and non-membranous organelles.

Relate plasma membrane structure to active and passive transport mechanisms.

Demonstrate knowledge of safety rules before working in the laboratory and model all safety rules in each lab activity.

Distinguish between plant and animal eukaryotic cell structures.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Describe the structure and function of a selectively permeable membrane and its role in diffusion and osmosis.

Demonstrate the proper use and care for scientific equipment used in the laboratory.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Explore the subcellular organelles responsible for protein synthesis and reproduction.

Acquire the skills necessary to set up, operate, and interpret the results from the use of the laboratory spectrophotometer.

Determine quantitatively the concentration of a solute in a solution, using the spectrophotometer.

Utilize the process of paper chromatography to identify the components of a chemical mixture.

Describe the chemical reactions essential to determination of protein concentrations in a solution through use of the Lowry method.

Prepare a series of protein concentrations using accurate and safe pipetting techniques.

Practice preparation of sample organic compounds, including methane, ethane, acetic acid, ethyl ethanoate, and methanol.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structures and functions of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structure and function of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Identify the major organelles, their structures and functions.

Determine the role of pigments.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Grade: 12
Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Relate cell membrane structure to its function in passive and active transport.

Relate chemical structure and characteristics of organic compounds to cell and organism functions.

Differentiate between elements, compounds, solutions, and mixtures.

Determine the factors affecting rates of solutions.

Classify a material as element, compound, solution or heterogeneous mixture.

Describe solutions in terms of solute and solvent; electrolyte or non-electrolyte; soluble or insoluble; unsaturated, saturated or supersaturated; miscible or immiscible.

Express the concentration of a solution as percent by mass, molarity, molality, and mole fraction, given appropriate data.

Describe how to make a solution of given molarity in terms of mass needed, or vice-versa.

Describe how to dilute a solution in terms of molarity and volume.

Classify species in aqueous solutions according to Arrhenius and Bronsted definitions, respectively.

Calculate the pH or pOH from the hydrogen or hydroxide ion concentrations of solutions and vice versa.

Represent reactions in aqueous solution with net ionic equations.

Contrast the relative entropy of a pure substance to the substance in solution.

Draw a schematic diagram (sketch) for an electrochemical cell, given an oxidation-reduction reaction that occurs in an aqueous solution.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Define the terms: anatomy, physiology, and homeostasis; explain the importance of the interaction between structure and function of organs and organ systems in the human body.

Explain the importance of water to body homeostasis.

Describe the structure and function of the components of a typical animal cell, including membranous and non-membranous organelles.

Relate plasma membrane structure to active and passive transport mechanisms.

Demonstrate knowledge of safety rules before working in the laboratory and model all safety rules in each lab activity.

Distinguish between plant and animal eukaryotic cell structures.

Identify and describe the structure and basic functions of the major eukaryotic organelles.

Describe the structure and function of a selectively permeable membrane and its role in diffusion and osmosis.

Demonstrate the proper use and care for scientific equipment used in the laboratory.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Explore the subcellular organelles responsible for protein synthesis and reproduction.

Acquire the skills necessary to set up, operate, and interpret the results from the use of the laboratory spectrophotometer.

Determine quantitatively the concentration of a solute in a solution, using the spectrophotometer.

Utilize the process of paper chromatography to identify the components of a chemical mixture.

Describe the chemical reactions essential to determination of protein concentrations in a solution through use of the Lowry method.

Prepare a series of protein concentrations using accurate and safe pipetting techniques.

Practice preparation of sample organic compounds, including methane, ethane, acetic acid, ethyl ethanoate, and methanol.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structures and functions of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Review the structure and function of the cell.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Identify the major organelles, their structures and functions.

Determine the role of pigments.

Apply the components of scientific processes and methods in the classroom and laboratory investigations.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Montana  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Grade: 10
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Grade: 11
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Grade: 12
Students will identify and use different types of listening appropriate to the listening situation (e.g., critical listening).

Students will identify, anticipate, and manage barriers to listening.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will investigate and use appropriate technology to demonstrate that all cells have common features as well as differences that determine function and that they are composed of common building blocks (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids).

Students will describe and explain the complex processes involved in energy use in cell maintenance, growth, repair and development.

Grade: 10
Students will investigate and use appropriate technology to demonstrate that all cells have common features as well as differences that determine function and that they are composed of common building blocks (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids).

Students will describe and explain the complex processes involved in energy use in cell maintenance, growth, repair and development.

Grade: 11
Students will investigate and use appropriate technology to demonstrate that all cells have common features as well as differences that determine function and that they are composed of common building blocks (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids).

Students will describe and explain the complex processes involved in energy use in cell maintenance, growth, repair and development.

Grade: 12
Students will investigate and use appropriate technology to demonstrate that all cells have common features as well as differences that determine function and that they are composed of common building blocks (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids).

Students will describe and explain the complex processes involved in energy use in cell maintenance, growth, repair and development.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

North Carolina  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Respond to informational texts or media by assessing the language, culture, structure, and historical perspective of the text to explain insights into language.

Grade: 10
Respond to informational texts or media by assessing the language, culture, structure, and historical perspective of the text to explain insights into language.

Grade: 11
Respond to informational texts or media by assessing the language, culture, structure, and historical perspective of the text to explain insights into language.

Grade: 12
Respond to informational texts or media by assessing the language, culture, structure, and historical perspective of the text to explain insights into language.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Compare and contrast the structure and functions of the following organic molecules: carbohydrates; proteins; lipids; nucleic acids.

Investigate and describe the structure and functions of cells including: cell organelles; cell specialization; communication among cells within an organism.

Investigate and analyze the cell as a living system including: maintenance of homeostasis; movement of materials into and out of cells; energy use and release in biochemical reactions.

Analyze and explain the interactive role of internal and external factors in health and disease: genetics; immune response; nutrition; parasites; soxins.

Investigate and analyze the properties and composition of solutions: solubility curves; concentration; polarity; pH scale; electrical conductivity.

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: relationship to each other; evolution.

Analyze cellular membranes: structure and function; variations; investigate mechanisms of transport; recommended laboratory - Diffusion and Osmosis

Examine sub cellular organization: describe the structure of cell organelles; relate structure to function; identify factors that limit cell size; interpret function of organelles in cellular processes.

Examine past and present research on cells, their structure and function.

Examine past and present research on biochemistry and cellular processes.

Examine the nature of solutions: types of solutions and factors affecting solubility; methods of expressing concentration (The use of normalities is not tested.); Raoult's law and colligative properties (nonvolatile solutes); osmosis; non-ideal behavior (qualitative aspects).

Grade: 10
Compare and contrast the structure and functions of the following organic molecules: carbohydrates; proteins; lipids; nucleic acids.

Investigate and describe the structure and functions of cells including: cell organelles; cell specialization; communication among cells within an organism.

Investigate and analyze the cell as a living system including: maintenance of homeostasis; movement of materials into and out of cells; energy use and release in biochemical reactions.

Analyze and explain the interactive role of internal and external factors in health and disease: genetics; immune response; nutrition; parasites; soxins.

Investigate and analyze the properties and composition of solutions: solubility curves; concentration; polarity; pH scale; electrical conductivity.

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: relationship to each other; evolution.

Analyze cellular membranes: structure and function; variations; investigate mechanisms of transport; recommended laboratory - Diffusion and Osmosis

Examine sub cellular organization: describe the structure of cell organelles; relate structure to function; identify factors that limit cell size; interpret function of organelles in cellular processes.

Examine past and present research on cells, their structure and function.

Examine past and present research on biochemistry and cellular processes.

Examine the nature of solutions: types of solutions and factors affecting solubility; methods of expressing concentration (The use of normalities is not tested.); Raoult's law and colligative properties (nonvolatile solutes); osmosis; non-ideal behavior (qualitative aspects).

Grade: 11
Compare and contrast the structure and functions of the following organic molecules: carbohydrates; proteins; lipids; nucleic acids.

Investigate and describe the structure and functions of cells including: cell organelles; cell specialization; communication among cells within an organism.

Investigate and analyze the cell as a living system including: maintenance of homeostasis; movement of materials into and out of cells; energy use and release in biochemical reactions.

Analyze and explain the interactive role of internal and external factors in health and disease: genetics; immune response; nutrition; parasites; soxins.

Investigate and analyze the properties and composition of solutions: solubility curves; concentration; polarity; pH scale; electrical conductivity.

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: relationship to each other; evolution.

Analyze cellular membranes: structure and function; variations; investigate mechanisms of transport; recommended laboratory - Diffusion and Osmosis

Examine sub cellular organization: describe the structure of cell organelles; relate structure to function; identify factors that limit cell size; interpret function of organelles in cellular processes.

Examine past and present research on cells, their structure and function.

Examine past and present research on biochemistry and cellular processes.

Examine the nature of solutions: types of solutions and factors affecting solubility; methods of expressing concentration (The use of normalities is not tested.); Raoult's law and colligative properties (nonvolatile solutes); osmosis; non-ideal behavior (qualitative aspects).

Grade: 12
Compare and contrast the structure and functions of the following organic molecules: carbohydrates; proteins; lipids; nucleic acids.

Investigate and describe the structure and functions of cells including: cell organelles; cell specialization; communication among cells within an organism.

Investigate and analyze the cell as a living system including: maintenance of homeostasis; movement of materials into and out of cells; energy use and release in biochemical reactions.

Analyze and explain the interactive role of internal and external factors in health and disease: genetics; immune response; nutrition; parasites; soxins.

Investigate and analyze the properties and composition of solutions: solubility curves; concentration; polarity; pH scale; electrical conductivity.

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells: relationship to each other; evolution.

Analyze cellular membranes: structure and function; variations; investigate mechanisms of transport; recommended laboratory - Diffusion and Osmosis

Examine sub cellular organization: describe the structure of cell organelles; relate structure to function; identify factors that limit cell size; interpret function of organelles in cellular processes.

Examine past and present research on cells, their structure and function.

Examine past and present research on biochemistry and cellular processes.

Examine the nature of solutions: types of solutions and factors affecting solubility; methods of expressing concentration (The use of normalities is not tested.); Raoult's law and colligative properties (nonvolatile solutes); osmosis; non-ideal behavior (qualitative aspects).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Demonstrate understanding and apply information and skills that are common to the foreign language class and other disciplines.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Demonstrate understanding and apply information and skills that are common to the foreign language class and other disciplines.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Demonstrate understanding and apply information and skills that are common to the foreign language class and other disciplines.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Demonstrate understanding and apply information and skills that are common to the foreign language class and other disciplines.

Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

North Dakota  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Conversation, Group Discussion, and Oral Presentation: Use critical listening skills; i.e., reflection

Grade: 10
Interpreting Media: Evaluate the portrayal of ethnicity and lifestyles in media messages

Interpreting Media: Analyze media messages

Grade: 11
Conversation, Group Discussion, and Oral Presentation: Adapt to a variety of speaking and listening situations such as formal presentations, oral interpretations, and group discussions

Grade: 12
Conversation, Group Discussion, and Oral Presentation: Use critical listening responses such as refutation and commentary, to critique the accuracy of messages

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Understand the structure and function of cells and their components.

Understand how systems and organisms develop through the differentiation of cells.

Grade: 10
Understand the structure and function of cells and their components.

Understand how systems and organisms develop through the differentiation of cells.

Grade: 11
Understand the structure and function of cells and their components.

Understand how systems and organisms develop through the differentiation of cells.

Grade: 12
Understand the structure and function of cells and their components.

Understand how systems and organisms develop through the differentiation of cells.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Nebraska  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Investigate and describe the form and function of subcellular structures that regulate cell activities.

Investigate and describe cell functions (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, cell division).

Investigate and understand that complex multicellular organisms are formed as highly organized arrangements of differentiated cells.

Investigate and understand that living systems require a constant input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organization.

Grade: 10
Investigate and describe the form and function of subcellular structures that regulate cell activities.

Investigate and describe cell functions (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, cell division).

Investigate and understand that complex multicellular organisms are formed as highly organized arrangements of differentiated cells.

Investigate and understand that living systems require a constant input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organization.

Grade: 11
Investigate and describe the form and function of subcellular structures that regulate cell activities.

Investigate and describe cell functions (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, cell division).

Investigate and understand that complex multicellular organisms are formed as highly organized arrangements of differentiated cells.

Investigate and understand that living systems require a constant input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organization.

Grade: 12
Investigate and describe the form and function of subcellular structures that regulate cell activities.

Investigate and describe cell functions (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, cell division).

Investigate and understand that complex multicellular organisms are formed as highly organized arrangements of differentiated cells.

Investigate and understand that living systems require a constant input of energy to maintain their chemical and physical organization.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

New Hampshire  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Employ questioning and paraphrase as aids in comprehending written texts, oral language, and audio-visual and graphic presentations.

Grade: 10
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Employ questioning and paraphrase as aids in comprehending written texts, oral language, and audio-visual and graphic presentations.

Grade: 11
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Employ questioning and paraphrase as aids in comprehending written texts, oral language, and audio-visual and graphic presentations.

Grade: 12
Critically evaluate written, spoken, audio-visual, and graphic messages.

Employ questioning and paraphrase as aids in comprehending written texts, oral language, and audio-visual and graphic presentations.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Students will be able to describe how essential materials enter cells and how waste and other materials leave the cell, e.g. diffusion, osmosis.

Students will be able to explain how cells use nutrients as a source of energy, e.g. respiration.

Students will be able to use tools and models to demonstrate that all cells have specialized structures that carry out specialized functions, e.g. microscopic evidence, photographic evidence.

Students will be able to describe the major functions of the living cell and discuss how different groups of cells perform interrelated functions in any organism.

Students will be able to explain, in general terms, the role DNA plays in controlling cell functions.

Students will be able to discuss, using observation, experimentation, and modeling, the connections between the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems.

Students will be able to describe/explain homeostasis (the maintenance of internal stability within organisms), i.e. regulation and communication between parts of the body on a macrocellular scale.

Grade: 10
Students will be able to describe how essential materials enter cells and how waste and other materials leave the cell, e.g. diffusion, osmosis.

Students will be able to explain how cells use nutrients as a source of energy, e.g. respiration.

Students will be able to use tools and models to demonstrate that all cells have specialized structures that carry out specialized functions, e.g. microscopic evidence, photographic evidence.

Students will be able to describe the major functions of the living cell and discuss how different groups of cells perform interrelated functions in any organism.

Students will be able to explain, in general terms, the role DNA plays in controlling cell functions.

Students will be able to discuss, using observation, experimentation, and modeling, the connections between the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems.

Students will be able to describe/explain homeostasis (the maintenance of internal stability within organisms), i.e. regulation and communication between parts of the body on a macrocellular scale.

Grade: 11
Students will be able to describe how essential materials enter cells and how waste and other materials leave the cell, e.g. diffusion, osmosis.

Students will be able to explain how cells use nutrients as a source of energy, e.g. respiration.

Students will be able to use tools and models to demonstrate that all cells have specialized structures that carry out specialized functions, e.g. microscopic evidence, photographic evidence.

Students will be able to describe the major functions of the living cell and discuss how different groups of cells perform interrelated functions in any organism.

Students will be able to explain, in general terms, the role DNA plays in controlling cell functions.

Students will be able to discuss, using observation, experimentation, and modeling, the connections between the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems.

Students will be able to describe/explain homeostasis (the maintenance of internal stability within organisms), i.e. regulation and communication between parts of the body on a macrocellular scale.

Grade: 12
Students will be able to describe how essential materials enter cells and how waste and other materials leave the cell, e.g. diffusion, osmosis.

Students will be able to explain how cells use nutrients as a source of energy, e.g. respiration.

Students will be able to use tools and models to demonstrate that all cells have specialized structures that carry out specialized functions, e.g. microscopic evidence, photographic evidence.

Students will be able to describe the major functions of the living cell and discuss how different groups of cells perform interrelated functions in any organism.

Students will be able to explain, in general terms, the role DNA plays in controlling cell functions.

Students will be able to discuss, using observation, experimentation, and modeling, the connections between the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems.

Students will be able to describe/explain homeostasis (the maintenance of internal stability within organisms), i.e. regulation and communication between parts of the body on a macrocellular scale.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

New Jersey  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Constructing Meaning from Media: Identify and evaluate how a media product expresses the values of the culture that produced it.

Grade: 10
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Constructing Meaning from Media: Identify and evaluate how a media product expresses the values of the culture that produced it.

Grade: 11
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Constructing Meaning from Media: Identify and evaluate how a media product expresses the values of the culture that produced it.

Grade: 12
Active Listening: Explore and reflect on ideas while hearing and focusing attentively.

Constructing Meaning from Media: Identify and evaluate how a media product expresses the values of the culture that produced it.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Matter, Energy and Organization in Living Systems: Relate the structure of molecules to their function in cellular structure and metabolism.

Grade: 10
Matter, Energy and Organization in Living Systems: Relate the structure of molecules to their function in cellular structure and metabolism.

Grade: 11
Matter, Energy and Organization in Living Systems: Relate the structure of molecules to their function in cellular structure and metabolism.

Grade: 12
Matter, Energy and Organization in Living Systems: Relate the structure of molecules to their function in cellular structure and metabolism.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

New Mexico  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Analyze the way in which literature and media are related to the themes and issues of their historical context.

Grade: 11
Analyze arguments, concepts, and perspectives presented in literary works and media.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Structure and Function: Know that cells are made of proteins composed of combinations of amino acids.

Structure and Function: Know that specialized structures inside cells in most organisms carry out different functions, including: parts of a cell and their functions (e.g., nucleus, chromosomes, plasma, and mitochondria); storage of genetic material in DNA; similarities and differences between plant and animal cells; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Structure and Function: Describe the mechanisms for cellular processes (e.g., energy production and storage, transport of molecules, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules).

Structure and Function: Know how the cell membrane controls which ions and molecules enter and leave the cell based on membrane permeability and transport (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport, passive transport).

Grade: 10
Structure and Function: Know that cells are made of proteins composed of combinations of amino acids.

Structure and Function: Know that specialized structures inside cells in most organisms carry out different functions, including: parts of a cell and their functions (e.g., nucleus, chromosomes, plasma, and mitochondria); storage of genetic material in DNA; similarities and differences between plant and animal cells; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Structure and Function: Describe the mechanisms for cellular processes (e.g., energy production and storage, transport of molecules, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules).

Structure and Function: Know how the cell membrane controls which ions and molecules enter and leave the cell based on membrane permeability and transport (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport, passive transport).

Grade: 11
Structure and Function: Know that cells are made of proteins composed of combinations of amino acids.

Structure and Function: Know that specialized structures inside cells in most organisms carry out different functions, including: parts of a cell and their functions (e.g., nucleus, chromosomes, plasma, and mitochondria); storage of genetic material in DNA; similarities and differences between plant and animal cells; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Structure and Function: Describe the mechanisms for cellular processes (e.g., energy production and storage, transport of molecules, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules).

Structure and Function: Know how the cell membrane controls which ions and molecules enter and leave the cell based on membrane permeability and transport (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport, passive transport).

Grade: 12
Structure and Function: Know that cells are made of proteins composed of combinations of amino acids.

Structure and Function: Know that specialized structures inside cells in most organisms carry out different functions, including: parts of a cell and their functions (e.g., nucleus, chromosomes, plasma, and mitochondria); storage of genetic material in DNA; similarities and differences between plant and animal cells; prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Structure and Function: Describe the mechanisms for cellular processes (e.g., energy production and storage, transport of molecules, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules).

Structure and Function: Know how the cell membrane controls which ions and molecules enter and leave the cell based on membrane permeability and transport (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport, passive transport).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Nevada  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Content: Create and apply criteria for evaluating content and delivery of oral and multi-media presentations.

Grade: 10
Content: Create and apply criteria for evaluating content and delivery of oral and multi-media presentations.

Grade: 11
Content: Create and apply criteria for evaluating content and delivery of oral and multi-media presentations.

Grade: 12
Content: Create and apply criteria for evaluating content and delivery of oral and multi-media presentations.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Structures, Functions, and Systems: Explain how the human body has a specialized anatomy and physiology composed of an hierarchical arrangement of differentiated cells.

Cellular Organization: Investigate and describe how every cell is covered by a cell membrane and most cells also have specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy, transfer, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement.

Grade: 10
Structures, Functions, and Systems: Explain how the human body has a specialized anatomy and physiology composed of an hierarchical arrangement of differentiated cells.

Cellular Organization: Investigate and describe how every cell is covered by a cell membrane and most cells also have specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy, transfer, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement.

Grade: 11
Structures, Functions, and Systems: Explain how the human body has a specialized anatomy and physiology composed of an hierarchical arrangement of differentiated cells.

Cellular Organization: Investigate and describe how every cell is covered by a cell membrane and most cells also have specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy, transfer, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement.

Grade: 12
Structures, Functions, and Systems: Explain how the human body has a specialized anatomy and physiology composed of an hierarchical arrangement of differentiated cells.

Cellular Organization: Investigate and describe how every cell is covered by a cell membrane and most cells also have specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy, transfer, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and movement.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

New York  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Grade: 10
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Grade: 11
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Grade: 12
Students make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Student uses a compound microscope/stereoscope effectively to see specimens clearly, using different magnifications; identifies and compares parts of a variety of cells; compares relative sizes of cells and organelles; and prepares wet-mount slides and uses appropriate staining techniques.

Students describe and explain the structures and functions of the human body at different organizational levels (e.g., systems, tissues, cells, organelles).

Students explain how a one-celled organism is able to function despite lacking the levels of organization present in more complex organisms.

Students explain the basic biochemical processes in living organisms and their importance in maintaining dynamic equilibrium.

Students explain disease as a failure of homeostasis.

Students relate processes at the system level to the cellular level in order to explain dynamic equilibrium in multicelled organisms.

Grade: 10
Student uses a compound microscope/stereoscope effectively to see specimens clearly, using different magnifications; identifies and compares parts of a variety of cells; compares relative sizes of cells and organelles; and prepares wet-mount slides and uses appropriate staining techniques.

Students describe and explain the structures and functions of the human body at different organizational levels (e.g., systems, tissues, cells, organelles).

Students explain how a one-celled organism is able to function despite lacking the levels of organization present in more complex organisms.

Students explain the basic biochemical processes in living organisms and their importance in maintaining dynamic equilibrium.

Students explain disease as a failure of homeostasis.

Students relate processes at the system level to the cellular level in order to explain dynamic equilibrium in multicelled organisms.

Grade: 11
Student uses a compound microscope/stereoscope effectively to see specimens clearly, using different magnifications; identifies and compares parts of a variety of cells; compares relative sizes of cells and organelles; and prepares wet-mount slides and uses appropriate staining techniques.

Students describe and explain the structures and functions of the human body at different organizational levels (e.g., systems, tissues, cells, organelles).

Students explain how a one-celled organism is able to function despite lacking the levels of organization present in more complex organisms.

Students explain the basic biochemical processes in living organisms and their importance in maintaining dynamic equilibrium.

Students explain disease as a failure of homeostasis.

Students relate processes at the system level to the cellular level in order to explain dynamic equilibrium in multicelled organisms.

Grade: 12
Student uses a compound microscope/stereoscope effectively to see specimens clearly, using different magnifications; identifies and compares parts of a variety of cells; compares relative sizes of cells and organelles; and prepares wet-mount slides and uses appropriate staining techniques.

Students describe and explain the structures and functions of the human body at different organizational levels (e.g., systems, tissues, cells, organelles).

Students explain how a one-celled organism is able to function despite lacking the levels of organization present in more complex organisms.

Students explain the basic biochemical processes in living organisms and their importance in maintaining dynamic equilibrium.

Students explain disease as a failure of homeostasis.

Students relate processes at the system level to the cellular level in order to explain dynamic equilibrium in multicelled organisms.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Ohio  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Evaluate the content and purpose of a presentation by analyzing the language and delivery choices made by a speaker.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace) in a variety of settings.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Identify types of arguments used by the speaker, such as authority and appeals to emotion.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Analyze the credibility of the speaker (e.g., hidden agendas, slanted or biased material) and recognize fallacies of reasoning used in presentations and media messages.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Identify the speaker's choice of language and delivery styles (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) and explain how they contribute to meaning.

Grade: 10
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Analyze the techniques used by speakers and media to influence an audience, and evaluate the effect this has on the credibility of a speaker or media message.

Evaluate the content and purpose of a presentation by analyzing the language and delivery choices made by a speaker.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace) in a variety of settings.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Interpret types of arguments used by the speaker such as authority and appeals to audience.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Evaluate the credibility of the speaker (e.g., hidden agendas, slanted or biased material) and recognize fallacies of reasoning used in presentations and media messages.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Identify how language choice and delivery styles (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) contribute to meaning.

Grade: 11
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace) in a variety of settings.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Analyze types of arguments used by a speaker, such as causation, analogy and logic.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Critique the clarity, effectiveness and overall coherence of a speaker's key points.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Evaluate how language choice, diction, syntax and delivery style (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) effect the mood and tone and impact the audience.

Grade: 12
Use a variety of strategies to enhance listening comprehension.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Apply active listening strategies (e.g., monitoring message for clarity, selecting and organizing essential information, noting cues such as changes in pace).

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Analyze types of arguments used by the speaker, such as causation, analogy and logic.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Critique the clarity, effectiveness and overall coherence of a speaker's key points.

Grade Level Indicator: Listening and Viewing: Evaluate how language choice, diction, syntax and delivery style (e.g., repetition, appeal to emotion, eye contact) affect the mood and tone and impact the audience.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain that cells are the basic unit of structure and function of living organisms, that once life originated all cells come from pre-existing cells, and that there are a variety of cell types.

Explain the characteristics of life as indicated by cellular processes and describe the process of cell division and development.

Grade: 10
Explain that cells are the basic unit of structure and function of living organisms, that once life originated all cells come from pre-existing cells, and that there are a variety of cell types.

Explain the characteristics of life as indicated by cellular processes and describe the process of cell division and development.

Grade Level Indicator: Characteristics and Structure of Life: Explain that living cells are composed of a small number of key chemical elements (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur); the basic unit of structure and function of all living things; come from pre-existing cells after life originated; and different from viruses.

Grade Level Indicator: Characteristics and Structure of Life: Compare the structure, function and interrelatedness of cell organelles in eukaryotic cells (e.g., nucleus, chromosome, mitochondria, cell membrane, cell wall, chloroplast, cilia, flagella) and prokaryotic cells.

Grade Level Indicator: Characteristics and Structure of Life: Explain the characteristics of life as indicated by cellular processes including homeostasis; energy transfers and transformation; transportation of molecules; disposal of wastes; synthesis of new molecules.

Grade Level Indicator: Diversity and Interdependence of Life: Describe how cells and organisms acquire and release energy (photosynthesis, chemosynthesis, cellular respiration and fermentation).

Grade Level Indicator: Diversity and Interdependence of Life: Explain that living organisms use matter and energy to synthesize a variety of organic molecules (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids) and to drive life processes (e.g., growth, reacting to the environment, reproduction and movement).

Grade: 11
Explain how processes at the cellular level affect the functions and characteristics of an organism.

Grade Level Indicator: Characteristics and Structure of Life: Describe how the maintenance of a relatively stable internal environment is required for the continuation of life, and explain how stability is challenged by changing physical, chemical and environmental conditions as well as the presence of pathogens.

Grade: 12
Explain how processes at the cellular level affect the functions and characteristics of an organism.

Grade Level Indicator: Characteristics and Structure of Life: Explain why specialized cells/structures are useful to plants and animals (e.g., stoma, phloem, xylem, blood, nerve, muscle, egg and sperm).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Oklahoma  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Focus attention on the speaker's message.

Listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, and individual or group performances.

Monitor speaker's message and clarity and understanding to formulate and provide effective verbal and nonverbal feedback.

Selects people with special interests and expectations who are the target audience for particular messages or products in visual media.

Grade: 10
Engage in critical, empathetic, appreciative, and reflective listening to interpret, respond and evaluate speaker's messages.

Evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

Grade: 11
Demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathetic, appreciative, and reflective listening to interpret, respond and evaluate speaker's messages.

Use effective strategies for listening that prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

Listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, and individual or group performances.

Use effective strategies to evaluate own listening such as asking questions for clarification, comparing and contrasting interpretations with others, and researching points of interest or contention.

Use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

Use a range of strategies to interpret visual media (e.g., draw conclusions, make generalizations, synthesize material viewed, refer to images or information in visual media to support point of view).

Describe how editing shapes meaning in visual media (e.g., omission of alternative perspectives; filtered or implied viewpoints; emphasis of specific ideas, images, or information in order to serve particular interests).

Uses a variety of criteria (e.g., clarity, accuracy, effectiveness, bias, relevance of facts) to evaluate informational media (e.g., Web sites, documentaries, news programs.

Compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same events such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet, and compose a study of the results.

Grade: 12
Demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathetic, appreciative, and reflective listening to interpret, respond and evaluate speaker's messages.

Use effective strategies for listening that prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

Listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, and individual or group performances.

Use effective strategies to evaluate own listening such as asking questions for clarification, comparing and contrasting interpretations with others, and researching points of interest or contention.

Use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

Use a range of strategies to interpret visual media (e.g., draw conclusions, make generalizations, synthesizes material viewed, refer to images or information in visual media to support point of view).

Demonstrate how editing shapes meaning in visual media (e.g., omission of alternative perspectives; filtered or implied viewpoints; emphasis of specific ideas, images, or information in order to serve particular interests).

Use a variety of criteria (e.g., clarity, accuracy, effectiveness, bias, relevance of facts) to evaluate informational media (e.g., Web sites, documentaries, news programs).

Use the effects of media on constructing his/her own perception of reality.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Cells are composed of a variety of structures such as the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, ribosomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.

Cells can differentiate and may develop into complex multicellular organisms (i.e., cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms).

Cells function according to the information contained in the master code of DNA (i.e., cell cycle, DNA to DNA, and DNA to RNA). Transfer RNA and protein synthesis will be taught in life science courses with rigor greater than Biology I.

Specialized cells enable organisms to monitor what is going on in the world around them (e.g., detect light, sound, specific chemicals, gravity, plant tropism, sense organs, homeostasis, etc.).

Grade: 10
Cells are composed of a variety of structures such as the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, ribosomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.

Cells can differentiate and may develop into complex multicellular organisms (i.e., cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms).

Cells function according to the information contained in the master code of DNA (i.e., cell cycle, DNA to DNA, and DNA to RNA). Transfer RNA and protein synthesis will be taught in life science courses with rigor greater than Biology I.

Specialized cells enable organisms to monitor what is going on in the world around them (e.g., detect light, sound, specific chemicals, gravity, plant tropism, sense organs, homeostasis, etc.).

Grade: 11
Cells are composed of a variety of structures such as the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, ribosomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.

Cells can differentiate and may develop into complex multicellular organisms (i.e., cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms).

Cells function according to the information contained in the master code of DNA (i.e., cell cycle, DNA to DNA, and DNA to RNA). Transfer RNA and protein synthesis will be taught in life science courses with rigor greater than Biology I.

Specialized cells enable organisms to monitor what is going on in the world around them (e.g., detect light, sound, specific chemicals, gravity, plant tropism, sense organs, homeostasis, etc.).

Grade: 12
Cells are composed of a variety of structures such as the nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, cytoplasm, ribosomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.

Cells can differentiate and may develop into complex multicellular organisms (i.e., cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms).

Cells function according to the information contained in the master code of DNA (i.e., cell cycle, DNA to DNA, and DNA to RNA). Transfer RNA and protein synthesis will be taught in life science courses with rigor greater than Biology I.

Specialized cells enable organisms to monitor what is going on in the world around them (e.g., detect light, sound, specific chemicals, gravity, plant tropism, sense organs, homeostasis, etc.).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Oregon  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Analysis: Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation, and evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Grade: 10
Analysis: Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation, and evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Grade: 11
Analysis: Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation, and evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Grade: 12
Analysis: Identify the aesthetic effects of a media presentation, and evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe how biological systems can maintain equilibrium (homeostasis).

Identify unique structures in cells from plants, animals, and prokaryotes.

Identify cell organelles and state how their activities contribute to a particular type of cell carrying out its functions.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in cell transport.

Distinguish between active and passive transport, including diffusion and osmosis, explaining the mechanics of each.

Grade: 10
Describe how biological systems can maintain equilibrium (homeostasis).

Identify unique structures in cells from plants, animals, and prokaryotes.

Identify cell organelles and state how their activities contribute to a particular type of cell carrying out its functions.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in cell transport.

Distinguish between active and passive transport, including diffusion and osmosis, explaining the mechanics of each.

Grade: 11
Describe how biological systems can maintain equilibrium (homeostasis).

Identify unique structures in cells from plants, animals, and prokaryotes.

Identify cell organelles and state how their activities contribute to a particular type of cell carrying out its functions.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in cell transport.

Distinguish between active and passive transport, including diffusion and osmosis, explaining the mechanics of each.

Grade: 12
Describe how biological systems can maintain equilibrium (homeostasis).

Identify unique structures in cells from plants, animals, and prokaryotes.

Identify cell organelles and state how their activities contribute to a particular type of cell carrying out its functions.

Explain the role of the cell membrane in cell transport.

Distinguish between active and passive transport, including diffusion and osmosis, explaining the mechanics of each.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Pennsylvania  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain the relationship between structure and function at the molecular and cellular levels.

Identify the specialized structures and regions of the cell and the functions of each.

Explain how cells store and use information to guide their functions.

Explain cell functions and processes in terms of chemical reactions and energy changes.

Grade: 10
Explain the relationship between structure and function at the molecular and cellular levels.

Identify the specialized structures and regions of the cell and the functions of each.

Explain how cells store and use information to guide their functions.

Explain cell functions and processes in terms of chemical reactions and energy changes.

Grade: 11
Explain and analyze the relationship between structure and function at the molecular, cellular and organ-system level.

Identify and describe factors affecting metabolic function (e.g., temperature, acidity, hormones).

Grade: 12
Explain and analyze the relationship between structure and function at the molecular, cellular and organ-system level.

Identify and describe factors affecting metabolic function (e.g., temperature, acidity, hormones).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Rhode Island  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Access, utilize, and apply information effectively through a variety of interactions with media for specific purposes.

Grade: 10
Access, utilize, and apply information effectively through a variety of interactions with media for specific purposes.

Grade: 11
Understand that barriers to effective communication exist; develop vocal, content, and organizational strategies that accommodate those barriers and enhance understanding and practice of spoken messages and listening behaviors.

Access, utilize, and apply information effectively through a variety of interactions with media for independently generated purposes.

Grade: 12
Understand that barriers to effective communication exist; develop vocal, content, and organizational strategies that accommodate those barriers and enhance understanding and practice of spoken messages and listening behaviors.

Access, utilize, and apply information effectively through a variety of interactions with media for independently generated purposes.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attractions between the amino acids in the chain.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter the molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity within a narrow range.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements, mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Grade: 10
Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attractions between the amino acids in the chain.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter the molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity within a narrow range.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements, mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Grade: 11
Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attractions between the amino acids in the chain.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter the molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity within a narrow range.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements, mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Grade: 12
Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that every cell is covered by a membrane that controls what can enter and leave the cell. In all but quite primitive cells, a complex network of proteins provides organization and shape and, for animal cells, movement.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that within the cell are specialized parts for the transport of materials, energy capture and release, protein building, waste disposal, information feedback, and even movement. In addition to these basic cellular functions common to all cells, most cells in multicellular organisms perform some special functions that others do not.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that the work of the cell is carried out by the many different types of molecules it assembles, mostly proteins. Protein molecules are long, usually folded chains made from 20 different kinds of amino-acid molecules. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific sequence of amino acids and the shape the chain takes is a consequence of attractions between the amino acids in the chain.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and acidity. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures and/or extremes of acidity can irreversibly change the structure of most protein molecules. Even small changes in acidity can alter the molecules and how they interact. Both single cells and multicellular organisms have molecules that help to keep the cell's acidity within a narrow range.

Cells: By the end of 12th grade, all students will know that a living cell is composed of a small number of chemical elements, mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous, and sulfur. Carbon, because of its small size and four available bonding electrons, can join to other carbon atoms in chains and rings to form large and complex molecules.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

South Carolina  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate nonprint sources for the effectiveness of the techniques used for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Grade: 10
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate nonprint sources for the effectiveness of the techniques used for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Grade: 11
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate nonprint sources for the effectiveness of the techniques used for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Grade: 12
Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze the types of arguments used by speakers.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate nonprint sources for the effectiveness of the techniques used for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the clarity, quality, effectiveness, and general coherence of a speaker's important points, arguments, evidence, organization of ideas, delivery, word choice, and syntax.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Demonstrate the ability to identify the aesthetic effects that appear in nonprint sources and to evaluate the techniques used to create them.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze historically significant speeches to identify the rhetorical devices and features that make them memorable.

Demonstrate the ability to use critical analysis to formulate appropriate oral responses through accurate and detailed references to texts.

Demonstrate the ability to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the techniques used in nonprint sources for particular audiences.

Demonstrate the ability to interpret and evaluate the various ways events are presented and information is communicated in nonprint sources.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Compare prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, and cell movement.

Trace the development of the Cell theory. (H)

Explain the role of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis.

Examine the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism (cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Explain homeostasis and predict the consequences of a lack of energy on homeostasis.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Identify factors that affect the rates at which substances dissolve.

Compare the ratios of solute to solvent in concentrated and dilute solutions in relation to the physical properties of the solution (e.g., conductivity, melting point depression).

Analyze the behavior of polar and nonpolar substances in forming solutions.

Analyze how these simpler molecules are rearranged into new molecules within living things. (N)

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and explain the functions of the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, cell movement, and active and passive transport

Trace the development of cell theory. (H)

Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate among the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis and explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Demonstrate the understanding that cells can differentiate and form complex multicellular organisms that are a highly organized arrangement of differentiated cells (e.g., illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism: cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Demonstrate an understanding of homeostasis and the effect of an energy deficit on that state.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Grade: 10
Compare prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, and cell movement.

Trace the development of the Cell theory. (H)

Explain the role of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis.

Examine the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism (cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Explain homeostasis and predict the consequences of a lack of energy on homeostasis.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Identify factors that affect the rates at which substances dissolve.

Compare the ratios of solute to solvent in concentrated and dilute solutions in relation to the physical properties of the solution (e.g., conductivity, melting point depression).

Analyze the behavior of polar and nonpolar substances in forming solutions.

Analyze how these simpler molecules are rearranged into new molecules within living things. (N)

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and explain the functions of the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, cell movement, and active and passive transport

Trace the development of cell theory. (H)

Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate among the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis and explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Demonstrate the understanding that cells can differentiate and form complex multicellular organisms that are a highly organized arrangement of differentiated cells (e.g., illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism: cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Demonstrate an understanding of homeostasis and the effect of an energy deficit on that state.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Grade: 11
Compare prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, and cell movement.

Trace the development of the Cell theory. (H)

Explain the role of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis.

Examine the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism (cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Explain homeostasis and predict the consequences of a lack of energy on homeostasis.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Identify factors that affect the rates at which substances dissolve.

Compare the ratios of solute to solvent in concentrated and dilute solutions in relation to the physical properties of the solution (e.g., conductivity, melting point depression).

Analyze the behavior of polar and nonpolar substances in forming solutions.

Analyze how these simpler molecules are rearranged into new molecules within living things. (N)

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and explain the functions of the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, cell movement, and active and passive transport

Trace the development of cell theory. (H)

Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate among the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis and explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Demonstrate the understanding that cells can differentiate and form complex multicellular organisms that are a highly organized arrangement of differentiated cells (e.g., illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism: cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Demonstrate an understanding of homeostasis and the effect of an energy deficit on that state.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Grade: 12
Compare prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, and cell movement.

Trace the development of the Cell theory. (H)

Explain the role of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis.

Examine the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism (cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Explain homeostasis and predict the consequences of a lack of energy on homeostasis.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Identify factors that affect the rates at which substances dissolve.

Compare the ratios of solute to solvent in concentrated and dilute solutions in relation to the physical properties of the solution (e.g., conductivity, melting point depression).

Analyze the behavior of polar and nonpolar substances in forming solutions.

Analyze how these simpler molecules are rearranged into new molecules within living things. (N)

Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Identify and explain the functions of the cellular structures that are responsible for energy production, waste disposal, molecular synthesis, storage of genetic material, cell movement, and active and passive transport

Trace the development of cell theory. (H)

Demonstrate an understanding of the roles of enzymes in chemical reactions within the cell.

Differentiate among the functions of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids in the cell.

Illustrate the steps of protein synthesis and explain the role of the triplet codon in protein synthesis.

Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of DNA and proteins in cell regulation.

Discuss mishaps in cell regulation (e.g., tumors). (P)

Demonstrate the understanding that cells can differentiate and form complex multicellular organisms that are a highly organized arrangement of differentiated cells (e.g., illustrate the development of both an animal and a plant multicellular organism: cells, specialized cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms).

Summarize the basic aerobic and anaerobic processes by which cellular respiration breaks down food molecules into energy that can be used by cells.

Analyze bond energy as it relates to food molecules.

Discuss the importance of ATP and how it is cycled.

Demonstrate an understanding of homeostasis and the effect of an energy deficit on that state.

Investigate how different organisms maintain homeostasis.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

South Dakota  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 11
To meet this standard students may critique advertisements in various forms of media for unsupported statements (for example: political campaign ads).

Grade: 12
To meet this standard, students may critique television/radio broadcasts and music for bias and stereotyping (for example: news coverage, sitcoms, commercials, talk shows, media influence on elections).

To meet this standard, students may recognize that messages are altered by various techniques used to create aesthetic effects (for example: manipulation by visual imagery, special effects, and vivid language. political messages).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Describe factors that affect solubility and rate of solution (example: nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, pressure of gases).

Relate cellular functions to specialized structures within cells (example: transport of materials, protein synthesis, energy capture release).

Analyze factors that can affect cellular activities.

Analyze relationships of the structures and of functions of different cells, tissues, organs, and systems.

Grade: 10
Describe factors that affect solubility and rate of solution (example: nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, pressure of gases).

Relate cellular functions to specialized structures within cells (example: transport of materials, protein synthesis, energy capture release).

Analyze factors that can affect cellular activities.

Analyze relationships of the structures and of functions of different cells, tissues, organs, and systems.

Grade: 11
Describe factors that affect solubility and rate of solution (example: nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, pressure of gases).

Relate cellular functions to specialized structures within cells (example: transport of materials, protein synthesis, energy capture release).

Analyze factors that can affect cellular activities.

Analyze relationships of the structures and of functions of different cells, tissues, organs, and systems.

Grade: 12
Describe factors that affect solubility and rate of solution (example: nature of solute and solvent, temperature, agitation, surface area, pressure of gases).

Relate cellular functions to specialized structures within cells (example: transport of materials, protein synthesis, energy capture release).

Analyze factors that can affect cellular activities.

Analyze relationships of the structures and of functions of different cells, tissues, organs, and systems.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Tennessee  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student is able to examine and respond to the effect(s) of media on the ideas, mores, and values of individuals, communities, and the world.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Grade: 10
The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student is able to examine and respond to the effect(s) of media on the ideas, mores, and values of individuals, communities, and the world.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Grade: 11
The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student is able to examine and respond to the effect(s) of media on the ideas, mores, and values of individuals, communities, and the world.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Grade: 12
The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student will explore the advantages and limitations of the computer as a communication tool.

The student will explain creative strategies used in the production of print and non-print media.

The student will demonstrate critical listening skills essential for comprehension and evaluation.

The student is able to examine and respond to the effect(s) of media on the ideas, mores, and values of individuals, communities, and the world.

The student will be able to demonstrate comprehension through a variety of responses (e.g., notetaking, questioning, summarizing, restating, discussing).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and it significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cellular organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animal cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to relate the structure of the cell membrane to the role of maintaining homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to define selective permeability, homeostasis, and plasmolysis.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given different molecules and concentrations.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish among various types of nucleic acids.

Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and its significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cell organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animals cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram or description.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, given structural diagrams (formulas).

Level 2: The student is able to identify a positive test for carbohydrates and lipids when given an experimental procedure, data, and results.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given examples of different molecules.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize the significance of homeostasis to the viability of human and other organisms, given the definition of homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to prepare wet mount slides.

Level 1: The student is able to demonstrate molecular movement across a semi-permeable membrane.

Level 2: The student is able to construct a model of each of the biomolecules given a structural diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the ratio of cell surface area to cell volume.

Level 3: The student is able to design and conduct a controlled experiment to observe enzymatic actions and identify possible sources of experimental error.

Level 3: The student is able to conduct a test to detect the presence of proteins.

Level 2: The student is able to relate positive and negative feedback mechanisms to the maintenance of homeostasis within the body.

Level 3: The student is able to identify the major cell and tissue groups.

Level 3: The student is able to develop scenarios of positive and negative feedback mechanisms and predict their effect upon homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to relate the structure of the skin to its role in protecting the body and maintenance of homeostasis.

Investigate organs utilized by the body for perception of external stimuli and to the maintenance of homeostasis.

Identify the major organs of the endocrine system and demonstrate the relation of each structure to hormonal regulation of homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to explain one biochemical mechanism for maintaining homeostasis within the circulatory or immune system, using drawings and labels.

Investigate the characteristics of solutions.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the solute and solvent in a solid, liquid or gaseous solution, given its composition.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a solution as saturated, unsaturated, or supersaturated, given the composition of the solution and a solubility graph.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the concentration of a solution in terms of molarity or mass percent, given mass of solute, and mass or volume of solution.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a substance as an acid or a base, given its properties (e.g., color of litmus, color of phenolphthalein, taste, pH and slippery or non-slippery).

Level 1: The student is able to demonstrate the factors (temperature, stirring, particle size and concentration) that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how to prepare a dilute solution from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate colligative properties, i.e. the effect on freezing point and boiling point when a solute is added to a solvent.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the molality of solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to classify a solution as neutral, acidic, or basic, and calculate the pH, given the hydrogen ion concentration or hydroxide ion concentration.

Extend their understanding of solutions that was introduced in Chemistry I.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate concentration of solutions (e.g., molarity, molality, and mass percent).

Level 2: The student is able to determine the concentration of a dilute solution that is prepared from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 2: The student is able to investigate colligative properties and calculate freezing point depression and boiling point elevation of a solvent when a solute is added to it (given formula and appropriate constants).

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate among unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions using solubility graphs.

Level 2: The student is able to identify factors affecting solubility (e.g., temperature, pressure, concentration and polarity).

Level 3: The student is able to apply Raoult's law and osmosis to the study of solutions given formulas.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate Beer's law using a dilution series.

Level 2: The student is able to graph data from a neutralization titration using strong or weak acids/bases.

Level 2: The student is able to determine if a precipitate will form given the concentrations of ions in solution (given a table of solubility product constants).

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the pH of buffer solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the solubility and resulting concentration using the common-ion effect.

Grade: 10
Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and it significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cellular organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animal cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to relate the structure of the cell membrane to the role of maintaining homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to define selective permeability, homeostasis, and plasmolysis.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given different molecules and concentrations.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish among various types of nucleic acids.

Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and its significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cell organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animals cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram or description.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, given structural diagrams (formulas).

Level 2: The student is able to identify a positive test for carbohydrates and lipids when given an experimental procedure, data, and results.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given examples of different molecules.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize the significance of homeostasis to the viability of human and other organisms, given the definition of homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to prepare wet mount slides.

Level 2: The student is able to construct a model of each of the biomolecules given a structural diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the ratio of cell surface area to cell volume.

Level 3: The student is able to design and conduct a controlled experiment to observe enzymatic actions and identify possible sources of experimental error.

Level 3: The student is able to conduct a test to detect the presence of proteins.

Level 2: The student is able to relate positive and negative feedback mechanisms to the maintenance of homeostasis within the body.

Level 3: The student is able to identify the major cell and tissue groups.

Level 3: The student is able to develop scenarios of positive and negative feedback mechanisms and predict their effect upon homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to relate the structure of the skin to its role in protecting the body and maintenance of homeostasis.

Investigate organs utilized by the body for perception of external stimuli and to the maintenance of homeostasis.

Identify the major organs of the endocrine system and demonstrate the relation of each structure to hormonal regulation of homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to explain one biochemical mechanism for maintaining homeostasis within the circulatory or immune system, using drawings and labels.

Investigate the characteristics of solutions.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the solute and solvent in a solid, liquid or gaseous solution, given its composition.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a solution as saturated, unsaturated, or supersaturated, given the composition of the solution and a solubility graph.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the concentration of a solution in terms of molarity or mass percent, given mass of solute, and mass or volume of solution.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a substance as an acid or a base, given its properties (e.g., color of litmus, color of phenolphthalein, taste, pH and slippery or non-slippery).

Level 1: The student is able to demonstrate the factors (temperature, stirring, particle size and concentration) that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how to prepare a dilute solution from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate colligative properties, i.e. the effect on freezing point and boiling point when a solute is added to a solvent.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the molality of solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to classify a solution as neutral, acidic, or basic, and calculate the pH, given the hydrogen ion concentration or hydroxide ion concentration.

Extend their understanding of solutions that was introduced in Chemistry I.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate concentration of solutions (e.g., molarity, molality, and mass percent).

Level 2: The student is able to determine the concentration of a dilute solution that is prepared from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 2: The student is able to investigate colligative properties and calculate freezing point depression and boiling point elevation of a solvent when a solute is added to it (given formula and appropriate constants).

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate among unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions using solubility graphs.

Level 2: The student is able to identify factors affecting solubility (e.g., temperature, pressure, concentration and polarity).

Level 3: The student is able to apply Raoult's law and osmosis to the study of solutions given formulas.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate Beer's law using a dilution series.

Level 2: The student is able to graph data from a neutralization titration using strong or weak acids/bases.

Level 2: The student is able to determine if a precipitate will form given the concentrations of ions in solution (given a table of solubility product constants).

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the pH of buffer solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the solubility and resulting concentration using the common-ion effect.

Grade: 11
Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and it significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cellular organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animal cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to relate the structure of the cell membrane to the role of maintaining homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to define selective permeability, homeostasis, and plasmolysis.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given different molecules and concentrations.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish among various types of nucleic acids.

Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and its significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cell organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animals cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram or description.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, given structural diagrams (formulas).

Level 2: The student is able to identify a positive test for carbohydrates and lipids when given an experimental procedure, data, and results.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given examples of different molecules.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize the significance of homeostasis to the viability of human and other organisms, given the definition of homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to prepare wet mount slides.

Level 2: The student is able to construct a model of each of the biomolecules given a structural diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the ratio of cell surface area to cell volume.

Level 3: The student is able to design and conduct a controlled experiment to observe enzymatic actions and identify possible sources of experimental error.

Level 3: The student is able to conduct a test to detect the presence of proteins.

Level 2: The student is able to relate positive and negative feedback mechanisms to the maintenance of homeostasis within the body.

Level 3: The student is able to identify the major cell and tissue groups.

Level 3: The student is able to develop scenarios of positive and negative feedback mechanisms and predict their effect upon homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to relate the structure of the skin to its role in protecting the body and maintenance of homeostasis.

Investigate organs utilized by the body for perception of external stimuli and to the maintenance of homeostasis.

Identify the major organs of the endocrine system and demonstrate the relation of each structure to hormonal regulation of homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to explain one biochemical mechanism for maintaining homeostasis within the circulatory or immune system, using drawings and labels.

Investigate the characteristics of solutions.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the solute and solvent in a solid, liquid or gaseous solution, given its composition.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a solution as saturated, unsaturated, or supersaturated, given the composition of the solution and a solubility graph.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the concentration of a solution in terms of molarity or mass percent, given mass of solute, and mass or volume of solution.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a substance as an acid or a base, given its properties (e.g., color of litmus, color of phenolphthalein, taste, pH and slippery or non-slippery).

Level 1: The student is able to demonstrate the factors (temperature, stirring, particle size and concentration) that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how to prepare a dilute solution from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate colligative properties, i.e. the effect on freezing point and boiling point when a solute is added to a solvent.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the molality of solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to classify a solution as neutral, acidic, or basic, and calculate the pH, given the hydrogen ion concentration or hydroxide ion concentration.

Extend their understanding of solutions that was introduced in Chemistry I.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate concentration of solutions (e.g., molarity, molality, and mass percent).

Level 2: The student is able to determine the concentration of a dilute solution that is prepared from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 2: The student is able to investigate colligative properties and calculate freezing point depression and boiling point elevation of a solvent when a solute is added to it (given formula and appropriate constants).

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate among unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions using solubility graphs.

Level 2: The student is able to identify factors affecting solubility (e.g., temperature, pressure, concentration and polarity).

Level 3: The student is able to apply Raoult's law and osmosis to the study of solutions given formulas.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate Beer's law using a dilution series.

Level 2: The student is able to graph data from a neutralization titration using strong or weak acids/bases.

Level 2: The student is able to determine if a precipitate will form given the concentrations of ions in solution (given a table of solubility product constants).

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the pH of buffer solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the solubility and resulting concentration using the common-ion effect.

Grade: 12
Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and it significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cellular organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animal cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 2: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to relate the structure of the cell membrane to the role of maintaining homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to define selective permeability, homeostasis, and plasmolysis.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given different molecules and concentrations.

Level 3: The student is able to distinguish among various types of nucleic acids.

Compare and contrast the chemistry of biomolecules and investigate their roles in cell structure and metabolism.

Explore and compare the organelles of different cell types.

Probe the composition of the cell membrane and its significance to homeostasis.

Analyze the various cell processes.

Level 1: The student is able to identify major cell organelles, given a diagram.

Level 1: The student is able to distinguish between plant and animals cells, given diagrams or scenarios.

Level 1: The student is able to predict the movement of water molecules across the cell membrane, given solutions of different concentrations.

Level 1: The student is able to compare and contrast the cell cycle in plant and animal cells, given a diagram or description.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish among proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, given structural diagrams (formulas).

Level 2: The student is able to identify a positive test for carbohydrates and lipids when given an experimental procedure, data, and results.

Level 2: The student is able to distinguish between active and passive transport, given examples of different molecules.

Level 2: The student is able to recognize the significance of homeostasis to the viability of human and other organisms, given the definition of homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to prepare wet mount slides.

Level 2: The student is able to construct a model of each of the biomolecules given a structural diagram.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the ratio of cell surface area to cell volume.

Level 3: The student is able to design and conduct a controlled experiment to observe enzymatic actions and identify possible sources of experimental error.

Level 3: The student is able to conduct a test to detect the presence of proteins.

Level 2: The student is able to relate positive and negative feedback mechanisms to the maintenance of homeostasis within the body.

Level 3: The student is able to identify the major cell and tissue groups.

Level 3: The student is able to develop scenarios of positive and negative feedback mechanisms and predict their effect upon homeostasis.

Level 1: The student is able to relate the structure of the skin to its role in protecting the body and maintenance of homeostasis.

Investigate organs utilized by the body for perception of external stimuli and to the maintenance of homeostasis.

Identify the major organs of the endocrine system and demonstrate the relation of each structure to hormonal regulation of homeostasis.

Level 2: The student is able to explain one biochemical mechanism for maintaining homeostasis within the circulatory or immune system, using drawings and labels.

Investigate the characteristics of solutions.

Level 2: The student is able to identify the solute and solvent in a solid, liquid or gaseous solution, given its composition.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a solution as saturated, unsaturated, or supersaturated, given the composition of the solution and a solubility graph.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate the concentration of a solution in terms of molarity or mass percent, given mass of solute, and mass or volume of solution.

Level 2: The student is able to classify a substance as an acid or a base, given its properties (e.g., color of litmus, color of phenolphthalein, taste, pH and slippery or non-slippery).

Level 1: The student is able to demonstrate the factors (temperature, stirring, particle size and concentration) that affect the rate at which a solute dissolves.

Level 2: The student is able to describe how to prepare a dilute solution from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate colligative properties, i.e. the effect on freezing point and boiling point when a solute is added to a solvent.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the molality of solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to classify a solution as neutral, acidic, or basic, and calculate the pH, given the hydrogen ion concentration or hydroxide ion concentration.

Extend their understanding of solutions that was introduced in Chemistry I.

Level 2: The student is able to calculate concentration of solutions (e.g., molarity, molality, and mass percent).

Level 2: The student is able to determine the concentration of a dilute solution that is prepared from a concentrated solution of known molarity.

Level 2: The student is able to investigate colligative properties and calculate freezing point depression and boiling point elevation of a solvent when a solute is added to it (given formula and appropriate constants).

Level 2: The student is able to differentiate among unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions using solubility graphs.

Level 2: The student is able to identify factors affecting solubility (e.g., temperature, pressure, concentration and polarity).

Level 3: The student is able to apply Raoult's law and osmosis to the study of solutions given formulas.

Level 3: The student is able to investigate Beer's law using a dilution series.

Level 2: The student is able to graph data from a neutralization titration using strong or weak acids/bases.

Level 2: The student is able to determine if a precipitate will form given the concentrations of ions in solution (given a table of solubility product constants).

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the pH of buffer solutions.

Level 3: The student is able to calculate the solubility and resulting concentration using the common-ion effect.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Texas  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
The student is expected to listen and respond appropriately to presentations and performances of peers or published works such as original essays or narratives, interpretations of poetry, or individual or group performances of scripts.

The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to create media products to include a five- to six-minute documentary, a print ad, an editorial, a flier, a movie critique, or an illustrated children's book to engage specific audiences.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as information, entertainment, and persuasion.

The student is expected to recognize strategies used by media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture such as advertising, perpetuation of stereotypes, use of visual representations, special effects, and language.

The student is expected to recognize how visual and sound techniques convey messages in media such as special effects, editing, camera angles, reaction shots, sequencing, and music.

The student is expected to use a range of techniques to plan and create a media text and reflect critically on the work produced.

The student is expected to evaluate media messages and products.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate standards for 'quality programming'.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate media's efforts to address social and cultural problems.

The student is expected to analyze and propose possible ways to improve mass media.

The student is expected to formulate guidelines for using media effectively to achieve governmental, societal, and cultural goals.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

The student is expected to distinguish between responsible and irresponsible media action.

Grade: 10
The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to create media products to include a five- to six-minute documentary, a print ad, an editorial, a flier, a movie critique, or an illustrated children's book to engage specific audiences.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as information, entertainment, and persuasion.

The student is expected to recognize strategies used by media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture such as advertising, perpetuation of stereotypes, use of visual representations, special effects, and language.

The student is expected to recognize how visual and sound techniques convey messages in media such as special effects, editing, camera angles, reaction shots, sequencing, and music.

The student is expected to use a range of techniques to plan and create a media text and reflect critically on the work produced.

The student is expected to evaluate media messages and products.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate standards for 'quality programming'.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate media's efforts to address social and cultural problems.

The student is expected to analyze and propose possible ways to improve mass media.

The student is expected to formulate guidelines for using media effectively to achieve governmental, societal, and cultural goals.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

The student is expected to distinguish between responsible and irresponsible media action.

Grade: 11
The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to create media products to include a five- to six-minute documentary, a print ad, an editorial, a flier, a movie critique, or an illustrated children's book to engage specific audiences.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as information, entertainment, and persuasion.

The student is expected to recognize strategies used by media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture such as advertising, perpetuation of stereotypes, use of visual representations, special effects, and language.

The student is expected to recognize how visual and sound techniques convey messages in media such as special effects, editing, camera angles, reaction shots, sequencing, and music.

The student is expected to use a range of techniques to plan and create a media text and reflect critically on the work produced.

The student is expected to evaluate media messages and products.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate standards for 'quality programming'.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate media's efforts to address social and cultural problems.

The student is expected to analyze and propose possible ways to improve mass media.

The student is expected to formulate guidelines for using media effectively to achieve governmental, societal, and cultural goals.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

The student is expected to distinguish between responsible and irresponsible media action.

Grade: 12
The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to engage in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to evaluate informative and persuasive presentations of peers, public figures, and media presentations.

The student is expected to evaluate artistic performances of peers, public presenters, and media presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to create media products to include a five- to six-minute documentary, a print ad, an editorial, a flier, a movie critique, or an illustrated children's book to engage specific audiences.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as prepares for listening, identifies the types of listening, and adopts appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to use effective strategies for listening such as preparing for listening, identifying the types of listening, and adopting appropriate strategies.

The student is expected to demonstrate proficiency in critical, empathic, appreciative, and reflective listening.

The student is expected to use effective listening to provide appropriate feedback in a variety of situations such as conversations and discussions and informative, persuasive, or artistic presentations.

The student is expected to analyze relationships, ideas, and cultures as represented in various media.

The student is expected to evaluate and critique the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, logical fallacies, and symbols.

The student is expected to compare, contrast, and critique various media coverage of the same event such as in newspapers, television, and on the Internet.

The student is expected to distinguish the purposes of various media forms such as information, entertainment, and persuasion.

The student is expected to recognize strategies used by media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture such as advertising, perpetuation of stereotypes, use of visual representations, special effects, and language.

The student is expected to recognize how visual and sound techniques convey messages in media such as special effects, editing, camera angles, reaction shots, sequencing, and music.

The student is expected to use a range of techniques to plan and create a media text and reflect critically on the work produced.

The student is expected to evaluate media messages and products.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate standards for 'quality programming'.

The student is expected to analyze and evaluate media's efforts to address social and cultural problems.

The student is expected to analyze and propose possible ways to improve mass media.

The student is expected to formulate guidelines for using media effectively to achieve governmental, societal, and cultural goals.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to use critical, reflective, and empathic listening skills to enhance interpersonal relationships.

The student is expected to use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening strategies to communicate effectively in groups.

The student is expected to identify the components of the listening process.

The student is expected to identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic.

The student is expected to listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to performance of others.

The student is expected to use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate.

The student is expected to distinguish between responsible and irresponsible media action.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The student is expected to relate the structure of water to its function as the universal solvent.

The student is expected to relate the concentration of ions in a solution to physical and chemical properties such as pH, electrolytic behavior, and reactivity.

The student is expected to demonstrate how factors such as particle size, influence the rate of dissolving.

The student is expected to identify the parts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

The student is expected to investigate and identify cellular processes including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, and synthesis of new molecules.

The student is expected to compare the structures and functions of viruses to cells and describe the role of viruses in causing diseases and conditions such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, common colds, smallpox, influenza, and warts.

The student is expected to compare cells from different parts of plants and animals including roots, stems, leaves, epithelia, muscles, and bones to show specialization of structure and function.

The student is expected to identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

Grade: 10
The student is expected to relate the structure of water to its function as the universal solvent.

The student is expected to relate the concentration of ions in a solution to physical and chemical properties such as pH, electrolytic behavior, and reactivity.

The student is expected to demonstrate how factors such as particle size, influence the rate of dissolving.

The student is expected to identify the parts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

The student is expected to investigate and identify cellular processes including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, and synthesis of new molecules.

The student is expected to compare the structures and functions of viruses to cells and describe the role of viruses in causing diseases and conditions such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, common colds, smallpox, influenza, and warts.

The student is expected to compare cells from different parts of plants and animals including roots, stems, leaves, epithelia, muscles, and bones to show specialization of structure and function.

The student is expected to identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

The student is expected to compare unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions.

The student is expected to measure and compare the rates of reaction of a solid reactant in solutions of varying concentration.

Grade: 11
The student is expected to identify the parts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

The student is expected to investigate and identify cellular processes including homeostasis, permeability, energy production, transportation of molecules, disposal of wastes, function of cellular parts, and synthesis of new molecules.

The student is expected to compare the structures and functions of viruses to cells and describe the role of viruses in causing diseases and conditions such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, common colds, smallpox, influenza, and warts.

The student is expected to compare cells from different parts of plants and animals including roots, stems, leaves, epithelia, muscles, and bones to show specialization of structure and function.

The student is expected to identify and describe the relationships between internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis.

The student is expected to compare unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions.

The student is expected to measure and compare the rates of reaction of a solid reactant in solutions of varying concentration.

Grade: 12
The student is expected to compare unsaturated, saturated, and supersaturated solutions.

The student is expected to measure and compare the rates of reaction of a solid reactant in solutions of varying concentration.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Utah  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen actively, e.g., determine organization, ask questions, attend to nonverbal cues.

Use comprehension strategies before, during, and after listening to functional information, e.g., following directions and test instructions, understanding PA announcements, attending to schedule changes.

Establish a purpose for viewing, e.g., acquiring information or ideas, seeking enjoyment, providing understanding.

Activate prior knowledge, e.g., knowledge of media, knowledge of subject.

Focus both visual and auditory attention.

Focus attention, e.g., eliminate distractions, listen and watch selectively, postpone reactions.

Use visual and auditory skills to determine organization, e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, question/answer, problem/solution, description, chronology, process.

Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen attentively to others' ideas and opinions.

Grade: 10
Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen actively, e.g., determine organization, ask questions, attend to nonverbal cues.

Use comprehension strategies before, during, and after listening to functional information, e.g., following directions and test instructions, understanding PA announcements, attending to schedule changes.

Listen for relevant information.

Focus both visual and auditory attention.

Focus attention, e.g., eliminate distractions, listen and watch selectively, postpone reactions.

Use visual and auditory skills to determine organization, e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, question/answer, problem/solution, description, chronology, process.

Listen and view critically, e.g., separate fact from opinion.

Evaluate inferences.

Distinguish reality from the constructed representation of reality, e.g., television, the Internet, drama, movie.

Synthesize information to clarify thoughts, communicate ideas, and solve problems.

Offer feedback.

Evaluate the usefulness, reliability, and accuracy of information.

Determine the accuracy, validity, and reliability of information viewed.

Recognize combinations of modes and organizations in a single piece.

Recognize the elements of each literary genre to increase understanding and appreciation of visual literature, e.g., myth, essay, poetry, young adult literature, classics.

Recognize and interpret the visual elements of literature, e.g., setting, description.

Compare and/or contrast the experiences of various cultures that might be reflected in visual literature.

Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen attentively to others' ideas and opinions.

Grade: 11
Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen actively, e.g., determine organization, ask questions, attend to nonverbal cues.

Use comprehension strategies before, during, and after listening to functional information, e.g., following directions and test instructions, understanding PA announcements, attending to schedule changes.

Listen for relevant information.

Focus both visual and auditory attention.

Focus attention, e.g., eliminate distractions, listen and watch selectively, postpone reactions.

Use visual and auditory skills to determine organization, e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, question/answer, problem/solution, description, chronology, process.

Listen and view critically, e.g., separate fact from opinion.

Evaluate inferences.

Distinguish reality from the constructed representation of reality, e.g., television, the Internet, drama, movie.

Synthesize information to clarify thoughts, communicate ideas, and solve problems.

Evaluate the usefulness, reliability, and accuracy of information.

Determine the accuracy, validity, and reliability of information viewed.

Compare and/or contrast the experiences of various cultures that might be reflected in visual literature.

Connect the visual text to another text, to a situation in life, and/or to an event or issue in the world, where appropriate.

Maintain focus, e.g., filter distractions, listen selectively, postpone reactions.

Listen attentively to others' ideas and opinions.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Explain how the properties of water (e.g., cohesion, adhesion, heat capacity, solvent properties) contribute to maintenance of cells and living organisms.

Describe cell theory and relate the nature of science to the development of cell theory (e.g., built upon previous knowledge, use of increasingly more sophisticated technology).

Describe how the transport of materials in and out of cells enables cells to maintain homeostasis (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport).

Describe the relationship between the organelles in a cell and the functions of that cell.

Describe the structure and function of various organ systems (i.e., digestion, respiration, circulation, protection and support, nervous) and how these systems contribute to homeostasis of the organism.

Use the terms solute and solvent in describing a solution.

Sketch a solution at the particle level.

Describe the relative amount of solute particles in concentrated and dilute solutions and express concentration in terms of molarity and molality.

Identify the colligative properties of a solution.

Measure change in boiling and/or freezing point of a solvent when a solute is added.

Describe how colligative properties affect the behavior of solutions in everyday applications (e.g., road salt, cold packs, antifreeze).

Grade: 10
Explain how the properties of water (e.g., cohesion, adhesion, heat capacity, solvent properties) contribute to maintenance of cells and living organisms.

Describe cell theory and relate the nature of science to the development of cell theory (e.g., built upon previous knowledge, use of increasingly more sophisticated technology).

Describe how the transport of materials in and out of cells enables cells to maintain homeostasis (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport).

Describe the relationship between the organelles in a cell and the functions of that cell.

Describe the structure and function of various organ systems (i.e., digestion, respiration, circulation, protection and support, nervous) and how these systems contribute to homeostasis of the organism.

Use the terms solute and solvent in describing a solution.

Sketch a solution at the particle level.

Describe the relative amount of solute particles in concentrated and dilute solutions and express concentration in terms of molarity and molality.

Identify the colligative properties of a solution.

Measure change in boiling and/or freezing point of a solvent when a solute is added.

Describe how colligative properties affect the behavior of solutions in everyday applications (e.g., road salt, cold packs, antifreeze).

Grade: 11
Explain how the properties of water (e.g., cohesion, adhesion, heat capacity, solvent properties) contribute to maintenance of cells and living organisms.

Describe cell theory and relate the nature of science to the development of cell theory (e.g., built upon previous knowledge, use of increasingly more sophisticated technology).

Describe how the transport of materials in and out of cells enables cells to maintain homeostasis (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport).

Describe the relationship between the organelles in a cell and the functions of that cell.

Describe the structure and function of various organ systems (i.e., digestion, respiration, circulation, protection and support, nervous) and how these systems contribute to homeostasis of the organism.

Use the terms solute and solvent in describing a solution.

Sketch a solution at the particle level.

Describe the relative amount of solute particles in concentrated and dilute solutions and express concentration in terms of molarity and molality.

Identify the colligative properties of a solution.

Measure change in boiling and/or freezing point of a solvent when a solute is added.

Describe how colligative properties affect the behavior of solutions in everyday applications (e.g., road salt, cold packs, antifreeze).

Grade: 12
Explain how the properties of water (e.g., cohesion, adhesion, heat capacity, solvent properties) contribute to maintenance of cells and living organisms.

Describe cell theory and relate the nature of science to the development of cell theory (e.g., built upon previous knowledge, use of increasingly more sophisticated technology).

Describe how the transport of materials in and out of cells enables cells to maintain homeostasis (i.e., osmosis, diffusion, active transport).

Describe the relationship between the organelles in a cell and the functions of that cell.

Describe the structure and function of various organ systems (i.e., digestion, respiration, circulation, protection and support, nervous) and how these systems contribute to homeostasis of the organism.

Use the terms solute and solvent in describing a solution.

Sketch a solution at the particle level.

Describe the relative amount of solute particles in concentrated and dilute solutions and express concentration in terms of molarity and molality.

Identify the colligative properties of a solution.

Measure change in boiling and/or freezing point of a solvent when a solute is added.

Describe how colligative properties affect the behavior of solutions in everyday applications (e.g., road salt, cold packs, antifreeze).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Virginia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 10
Essential Knowledge, Skills, and Processes: Students are expected to assume responsibility for and participate in small-group learning activities by contributing ideas and respectfully listening to and considering the views of the other group members.

Grade: 11
Compare and evaluate adaptations and interpretations of script for stage, film, or television.

Essential Knowledge, Skills, and Processes: Students are expected to compare and evaluate adaptations and interpretations of a script for stage, film, or television.

Subject: Science

Grade: 10
Key concepts include evidence supporting the cell theory.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the development of the cell theory was accelerated by the ability to make observations on a microscopic level.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the cell theory states that all living things are composed of cells and that cells come from other cells by the process of cell reproduction.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that continued advances in microscopy allowed observation of cell organelles and ultrastructure. Current technology allows the observation of cellular processes underlying both cell structure and function.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that about two thirds of the mass of a cell is made up of water, and most of the biochemical processes of life occur in water solutions.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that most life processes are a series of chemical reactions influenced by environmental and genetic factors.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that inside every cell is a concentrated mixture of thousands of different macromolecules forming a variety of specialized structures that carry out cell functions, such as energy production, transport, waste disposal, synthesis of new molecules, and storage of genetic material.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that protein molecules that are assembled in cells carry out most of the cells' work. The function of each protein molecule depends on its specific conformation. The chemical reactions that occur inside cells are directly controlled by a large set of protein molecules called enzymes, whose functions depend on their specific shapes.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that water absorbs heat when it evaporates, allowing organisms to release excess heat.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that water is able to dissolve many substances; therefore, the water inside and outside of cells is able to carry nutrients into and around cells and wastes away from cells.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that organisms can tolerate only small changes in pH because every cell has a particular pH at which it functions best. For example, changes in pH cause changes in enzyme conformation, resulting in a change in activity.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that some proteins are structural (hair, nails). Others function in transport (hemoglobin), movement (muscle fibers and cytoskeletal elements), defense (antibodies), and regulation of cell functions (hormones and enzymes).

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that most cells function best within a narrow range of temperature and pH. At very low temperatures, reaction rates are too slow. High temperatures or extremes of pH can irreversibly change the structure of proteins and alter their function.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that during photosynthesis, cells trap energy from sunlight with chlorophyll and use the energy, carbon dioxide and water to produce energy-rich organic molecules (glucose) and oxygen.

Key concepts include similarities between the activities of a single cell and a whole organism.

Key concepts include the cell membrane model (diffusion, osmosis, and active transport).

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that the cell theory is the unifying theme in biology because it emphasizes the similarity of all living things.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that cell structure is one of the ways in which organisms differ from each other.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that cells are the basic units of structure and function of all living things.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that cells contain specialized structures to perform functions necessary for life.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that cellular activities necessary for life include chemical reactions that facilitate acquiring energy, reproduction, and adaptation/maintaining homeostasis.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that homeostasis of a cell is maintained by a plasma membrane comprised of a variety of organic molecules that controls the movement of material in and out of the cell, communication between cells, and the recognition of cells to facilitate multiple metabolic functions.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that several differences between eukaryotes and prokaryotes include size, genetic material surrounded by a nuclear membrane, and the addition of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that essential cell structures and their functions include: the nucleus (contains DNA; site where RNA is made); ribosome (site of protein synthesis); mitochondria (site of cell respiration); chloroplast (site of photosynthesis); endoplasmic reticulum (transports materials through the cell); Golgi (site where cell products are packaged for export); lysosome (contains digestive enzymes); cell membrane (controls what enters and leaves the cell); cell wall (provides support).

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the basic processes necessary for living things to survive are the same for a single cell as they are for a more complex organism.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that a single-celled organism has to conduct all life processes by itself. A multicellular organism has groups of cells that specialize to perform specific functions.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the fluid mosaic model of a membrane emphasizes the arrangement and function of a bilayer of phospholipids, transport proteins, and cholesterol.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that diffusion occurs in cells when substances (oxygen, carbon dioxide, salts, sugars, amino acids) that are dissolved in water move from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that osmosis refers to the movement of water molecules through a semi-permeable membrane from an area of greater water concentration or pressure to an area of lesser water concentration or pressure.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that active transport refers to the movement of solid and liquid particles into and out of a cell by endocytosis and exocytosis.

Key concepts include maintenance of homeostasis.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that like other organisms, human beings are composed of groups of cells (tissues, organs, and organ systems) that are specialized to provide the human organism with the basic requirements for life: obtaining food and deriving energy from it, maintaining homeostasis, coordinating body functions, and reproducing.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that organ systems function and interact to maintain a stable internal environment that can resist disturbance from within or without (homeostasis).

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that for the body to use food for energy, the food must first be digested into molecules that are absorbed and transported to cells, where the food is used for energy and for repair and growth.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that to burn food for the release of energy, oxygen must be supplied to cells and carbon dioxide removed. The respiratory system responds to changing demands by increasing or decreasing breathing rate in order to maintain homeostasis.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that the circulatory system, which moves all of these substances to or from cells, responds to changing demands by increasing or decreasing heart rate and blood flow in order to maintain homeostasis.

Key concepts include cell specialization.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that a typical cell goes through a process of growth, development, and reproduction called the cell cycle.

Grade: 11
Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that matter occurs as elements (pure), compounds (pure), and mixtures, which may be homogeneous (solutions) or heterogeneous.

Key concepts include solution concentrations.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that solutions can be a variety of solute/solvent combinations: gas/gas, gas/liquid, liquid/liquid, solid/liquid, gas/solid, liquid/solid, or solid/solid.

Key concepts include colligative properties.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that polar substances dissolve ionic or polar substances; nonpolar substances dissolve nonpolar substances.

Essential Understandings: All students should understand that the number of solute particles changes the freezing point and boiling point of a pure substance.

Essential Knowledge and Skills: Students are expected to know that a liquid's boiling point and freezing point are affected by the presence of certain solutes.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Vermont  Back to Top

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
This is evident when students demonstrate understanding of the uniqueness of the cell in different organisms (plants, animals, microorganisms) and the structures and functions of the cell (e.g., chemical reactions, diffusion of materials, direction by DNA of the synthesis of proteins, regulation, differentiation).

Grade: 10
This is evident when students demonstrate understanding of the uniqueness of the cell in different organisms (plants, animals, microorganisms) and the structures and functions of the cell (e.g., chemical reactions, diffusion of materials, direction by DNA of the synthesis of proteins, regulation, differentiation).

Grade: 11
This is evident when students demonstrate understanding of the uniqueness of the cell in different organisms (plants, animals, microorganisms) and the structures and functions of the cell (e.g., chemical reactions, diffusion of materials, direction by DNA of the synthesis of proteins, regulation, differentiation).

Grade: 12
This is evident when students demonstrate understanding of the uniqueness of the cell in different organisms (plants, animals, microorganisms) and the structures and functions of the cell (e.g., chemical reactions, diffusion of materials, direction by DNA of the synthesis of proteins, regulation, differentiation).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Washington  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Draw inferences based on visual information and/or people's behaviors.

Explore different perspectives on complex issues through viewing a range of visual texts.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Uses listening strategy appropriate to purpose (Grade 9 framework).

Listening and Observing: Listens and observes to identify inferences in oral communication (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for audience (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for content and purpose (e.g., change an attitude, sell a product, sway a vote) (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for technical strategies (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes the influence of media sources (Grade 9 framework).

Ask questions to interpret and evaluate oral and visual contexts based on information from a variety of sources.

Make judgments and inferences.

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for audience (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for content and purpose (e.g., change an attitude, sell a product, sway a vote) (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes how the connection between form and content creates an effect (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for technical strategies (Grade 9 framework).

Identify and evaluate complex techniques used in mass communications such as generalization, appeal to popularity, and appeal to emotion .

Analyze and explain the effectiveness of methods used in mass communication.

Analyze and interpret the influence of media sources.

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for audience (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for content and purpose (e.g., change an attitude, sell a product, sway a vote) (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes the choices that were made in the construction of media texts (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Contrasts the media-constructed versions of reality with alternative versions of reality (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media texts for technical strategies (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes how the connection between form and content creates an effect (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Explains the basis for multiple interpretations of media (e.g., life experiences, frame of reference) (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes media for commercial implications (Grade 9 framework).

Evaluating: Analyzes the influence of media sources (Grade 9 framework).

Grade: 10
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Draw inferences based on visual information and/or people's behaviors.

Explore different perspectives on complex issues through viewing a range of visual texts.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Analyzes speaker's and listener's purpose to select and use an appropriate listening strategy (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Compares the range of different interpretations the same media text can stimulate for different audiences (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Interprets the influence of media sources (e.g., accuracy, bias, point of view) (Grade 10 framework).

Ask questions to interpret and evaluate oral and visual contexts based on information from a variety of sources.

Make judgments and inferences.

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates how the form and content choices created the desired effects (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Identify and evaluate complex techniques used in mass communications such as generalization, appeal to popularity, and appeal to emotion .

Analyze and explain the effectiveness of methods used in mass communication.

Analyze and interpret the influence of media sources.

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates implications of the choices that were made in the construction of media texts (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates how the form and content choices created the desired effects (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Compares the range of different interpretations the same media text can stimulate for different audiences (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates the effects of commercialism on media (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Interprets the influence of media sources (e.g., accuracy, bias, point of view) (Grade 10 framework).

Grade: 11
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Draw inferences based on visual information and/or people's behaviors.

Explore different perspectives on complex issues through viewing a range of visual texts.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Analyzes speaker's and listener's purpose to select and use an appropriate listening strategy (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Compares the range of different interpretations the same media text can stimulate for different audiences (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Interprets the influence of media sources (e.g., accuracy, bias, point of view) (Grade 10 framework).

Ask questions to interpret and evaluate oral and visual contexts based on information from a variety of sources.

Make judgments and inferences.

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates how the form and content choices created the desired effects (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Identify and evaluate complex techniques used in mass communications such as generalization, appeal to popularity, and appeal to emotion .

Analyze and explain the effectiveness of methods used in mass communication.

Analyze and interpret the influence of media sources.

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates implications of the choices that were made in the construction of media texts (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates how the form and content choices created the desired effects (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Compares the range of different interpretations the same media text can stimulate for different audiences (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates the effects of commercialism on media (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Interprets the influence of media sources (e.g., accuracy, bias, point of view) (Grade 10 framework).

Grade: 12
Use attention level appropriate for particular circumstances and contexts.

Analyze and reflect on ideas while paying attention and listening in a variety of situations.

Draw inferences based on visual information and/or people's behaviors.

Explore different perspectives on complex issues through viewing a range of visual texts.

Listen for, identify and explain: information vs. persuasion; inferences; emotive rhetoric vs. reasoned arguments.

Use a variety of effective listening strategies.

Listening and Observing: Analyzes speaker's and listener's purpose to select and use an appropriate listening strategy (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Compares the range of different interpretations the same media text can stimulate for different audiences (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Interprets the influence of media sources (e.g., accuracy, bias, point of view) (Grade 10 framework).

Ask questions to interpret and evaluate oral and visual contexts based on information from a variety of sources.

Make judgments and inferences.

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates how the form and content choices created the desired effects (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Identify and evaluate complex techniques used in mass communications such as generalization, appeal to popularity, and appeal to emotion .

Analyze and explain the effectiveness of methods used in mass communication.

Analyze and interpret the influence of media sources.

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for audience (e.g., How appropriate to the audience was the selected form?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media texts for stated and implied purpose (e.g., How well was the purpose met or achieved?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates implications of the choices that were made in the construction of media texts (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates content of media texts (e.g., How effective was the support? How effective was the content for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text for technical strategies (e.g., How effective were the selected techniques for the target audience and purpose?) (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates media text persuasive techniques for effectiveness, credibility, and bias (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates how the form and content choices created the desired effects (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Compares the range of different interpretations the same media text can stimulate for different audiences (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Evaluates the effects of commercialism on media (Grade 10 framework).

Evaluating: Interprets the influence of media sources (e.g., accuracy, bias, point of view) (Grade 10 framework).

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Life Science: Structure and Organization of Living Systems: Understand that specific genes regulate the functions performed by structures within the cells of multi-cellular organisms.

Grade: 10
Life Science: Structure and Organization of Living Systems: Understand that specific genes regulate the functions performed by structures within the cells of multi-cellular organisms.

Grade: 11
Life Science: Structure and Organization of Living Systems: Understand that specific genes regulate the functions performed by structures within the cells of multi-cellular organisms.

Grade: 12
Life Science: Structure and Organization of Living Systems: Understand that specific genes regulate the functions performed by structures within the cells of multi-cellular organisms.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Wisconsin  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Develop and apply evaluative criteria of accuracy and point of view to broadcast news programs.

Analyze the content and effect of subtle persuasive techniques used on-line and in broadcast and print media.

Develop and apply criteria for evaluating broadcast programming.

Analyze the effect of media production techniques, such as music, camera angles, fade-outs, and lighting, on different audiences.

Evaluate the impact of various market factors on the effectiveness of media production and distribution.

Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message.

Develop and present criteria for evaluating a variety of media products.

Evaluate audience feedback on the clarity, form, effectiveness, technical achievement and aesthetic appeal of media work.

Grade: 10
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Develop and apply evaluative criteria of accuracy and point of view to broadcast news programs.

Analyze the content and effect of subtle persuasive techniques used on-line and in broadcast and print media.

Develop and apply criteria for evaluating broadcast programming.

Analyze the effect of media production techniques, such as music, camera angles, fade-outs, and lighting, on different audiences.

Evaluate the impact of various market factors on the effectiveness of media production and distribution.

Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message.

Develop and present criteria for evaluating a variety of media products.

Evaluate audience feedback on the clarity, form, effectiveness, technical achievement and aesthetic appeal of media work.

Grade: 11
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Develop and apply evaluative criteria of accuracy and point of view to broadcast news programs.

Analyze the content and effect of subtle persuasive techniques used on-line and in broadcast and print media.

Develop and apply criteria for evaluating broadcast programming.

Analyze the effect of media production techniques, such as music, camera angles, fade-outs, and lighting, on different audiences.

Evaluate the impact of various market factors on the effectiveness of media production and distribution.

Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message.

Develop and present criteria for evaluating a variety of media products.

Evaluate audience feedback on the clarity, form, effectiveness, technical achievement and aesthetic appeal of media work.

Grade: 12
Attend to both literal and connotative meanings.

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information.

Analyze messages for their accuracy and usefulness.

Develop and apply evaluative criteria of accuracy and point of view to broadcast news programs.

Analyze the content and effect of subtle persuasive techniques used on-line and in broadcast and print media.

Develop and apply criteria for evaluating broadcast programming.

Analyze the effect of media production techniques, such as music, camera angles, fade-outs, and lighting, on different audiences.

Evaluate the impact of various market factors on the effectiveness of media production and distribution.

Identify the impact of image and context on particular audiences receiving the same message.

Develop and present criteria for evaluating a variety of media products.

Evaluate audience feedback on the clarity, form, effectiveness, technical achievement and aesthetic appeal of media work.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
The Cell: Evaluate the normal structures and the general and special functions of cells in single-celled and multiple-celled organisms.

The Cell: Understand how cells differentiate and how cells are regulated.

The Molecular Basis of Heredity: State the relationships between functions of the cell and functions of the organism as related to genetics and heredity.

Grade: 10
The Cell: Evaluate the normal structures and the general and special functions of cells in single-celled and multiple-celled organisms.

The Cell: Understand how cells differentiate and how cells are regulated.

The Molecular Basis of Heredity: State the relationships between functions of the cell and functions of the organism as related to genetics and heredity.

Grade: 11
The Cell: Evaluate the normal structures and the general and special functions of cells in single-celled and multiple-celled organisms.

The Cell: Understand how cells differentiate and how cells are regulated.

The Molecular Basis of Heredity: State the relationships between functions of the cell and functions of the organism as related to genetics and heredity.

Grade: 12
The Cell: Evaluate the normal structures and the general and special functions of cells in single-celled and multiple-celled organisms.

The Cell: Understand how cells differentiate and how cells are regulated.

The Molecular Basis of Heredity: State the relationships between functions of the cell and functions of the organism as related to genetics and heredity.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

West Virginia  Back to Top

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Students will review listening behaviors prior to a school wide audience activity (e.g., staying alert; resisting distractions; identifying and adapting to the speaker's purpose).

Students will listen to identify the purpose, make predictions, distinguish fact from opinion and construct meaning from discussion, speech or media.

Grade: 10
Students will practice and master listening, speaking and viewing by using a variety of techniques (e.g., videos, power point presentations; audiotape; web pages).

Grade: 11
Students will practice and master listening, speaking and viewing objectives (e.g., videos; PowerPoint presentations; web pages; evaluating a selection on audiotape).

Grade: 12
Students will identify the barriers to effective listening and plan methods to overcome them.

Students will analyze the changes in mass communication caused by the widespread use of technology.

Students will listen accurately before recording direct and indirect quotations.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Matter, Energy, and Organization in Living Systems: Students will identify and compare the structure and function of cell, tissues and systems of different organisms.

Matter, Energy, and Organization in Living Systems: Students will trace the transfer of matter and energy in the chemical-molecular processes of photosynthesis, respiration and fermentation.

Grade: 10
The Cell and Molecular Basis for Heredity: Students will identify and explain the structures and functions of cell organelles (e.g., Golgi bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, chloroplasts, ribosomes, lysosomes, vacuoles).

The Cell and Molecular Basis for Heredity: Students will compare the variations in cells, tissues and organs of different organisms (e.g. endocrine, nervous, digestion and immune systems).

The Cell and Molecular Basis for Heredity: Students will identify mechanisms for the movement of materials into and out of cells (e.g., active and passive transport, endo- and exocytosis).

Structure and Properties of Matter: Students will investigate the properties of solutions including density, conductivity, solubility, concentration, pH and colligative properties.

Grade: 11
Cell Function and Genetics: Students will identify the structure, functions, and interactions of eukaryotic cell organelles and their products.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will analyze the chemistry and structure of the cell membrane as it relates to import and export of molecules necessary for life, exploring osmosis, diffusion, active and passive transport and dialysis.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will research the diversity-uniqueness of cell types (compare differences in prokaryotic-eukaryotic, plant-animal cells; explore nerve cells, blood cells, gametes, etc.).

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will explore capture and release of energy as demonstrated by photosynthesis, cellular respiration, fermentation, and the role of coenzymes and vitamins.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will investigate and discuss homeostasis.

Matter and Energy: Students will explore material transport in and out of cells (e.g., diffusion and osmosis).

Chemical Foundations: Students will estimate molecular weight through the diffusion of biological stains.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will review the structure and function of cell membranes.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will review DNA as it relates to mitosis, meiosis and protein synthesis.

Cellular -Tissue-System Levels of Organization: Students will identify the structure, functions and interactions of eukaryotic cell organelles and their products.

Cellular -Tissue-System Levels of Organization: Students will describe the organizational levels, interdependency and the interaction of cells, tissues, organs, organ systems.

Systems Level of Organization: Students will identify the cellular processes and the energy and nutritional requirements needed to maintain human metabolism.

Solution Chemistry: Students will review colligative properties.

Solution Chemistry: Students will solve problems using the solubility product constants.

Bonding: Students will predict solute solubility based on molecular polarity.

Solution chemistry: Students will review solution properties (e.g., solubility, conductivity, density, pH and colligative).

Solution chemistry: Students will define solutions in terms of saturation.

Solution chemistry: Students will perform solutions concentration calculations (e.g. molarity, ppm).

Grade: 12
Cell Function and Genetics: Students will identify the structure, functions, and interactions of eukaryotic cell organelles and their products.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will analyze the chemistry and structure of the cell membrane as it relates to import and export of molecules necessary for life, exploring osmosis, diffusion, active and passive transport and dialysis.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will research the diversity-uniqueness of cell types (compare differences in prokaryotic-eukaryotic, plant-animal cells; explore nerve cells, blood cells, gametes, etc.).

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will explore capture and release of energy as demonstrated by photosynthesis, cellular respiration, fermentation, and the role of coenzymes and vitamins.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will investigate and discuss homeostasis.

Matter and Energy: Students will explore material transport in and out of cells (e.g., diffusion and osmosis).

Chemical Foundations: Students will estimate molecular weight through the diffusion of biological stains.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will review the structure and function of cell membranes.

Cell Function and Genetics: Students will review DNA as it relates to mitosis, meiosis and protein synthesis.

Cellular -Tissue-System Levels of Organization: Students will identify the structure, functions and interactions of eukaryotic cell organelles and their products.

Cellular -Tissue-System Levels of Organization: Students will describe the organizational levels, interdependency and the interaction of cells, tissues, organs, organ systems.

Systems Level of Organization: Students will identify the cellular processes and the energy and nutritional requirements needed to maintain human metabolism.

Solution Chemistry: Students will review colligative properties.

Solution Chemistry: Students will solve problems using the solubility product constants.

Bonding: Students will predict solute solubility based on molecular polarity.

Solution chemistry: Students will review solution properties (e.g., solubility, conductivity, density, pH and colligative).

Solution chemistry: Students will define solutions in terms of saturation.

Solution chemistry: Students will perform solutions concentration calculations (e.g. molarity, ppm).

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

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Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 9
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Complete task based on directions given.

Grade: 10
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Complete task based on directions given.

Grade: 11
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Complete task based on directions given.

Grade: 12
Explaining a speaker's or performer's intent.

Evaluating the accuracy, relevance, and bias of sources.

Students use others' works for models for effective speaking.

Complete task based on directions given.

Subject: Science

Grade: 9
Life Systems: The Cell: Students explain the processes of life, which necessitates an understanding of relationship between structure and function of the cell and cellular differentiation. They identify activities taking place in an organism related to metabolic activities in cells, including growth, regulation, transport, and homeostasis. Students differentiate between asexual and sexual reproduction.

Grade: 10
Life Systems: The Cell: Students explain the processes of life, which necessitates an understanding of relationship between structure and function of the cell and cellular differentiation. They identify activities taking place in an organism related to metabolic activities in cells, including growth, regulation, transport, and homeostasis. Students differentiate between asexual and sexual reproduction.

Grade: 11
Life Systems: The Cell: Students explain the processes of life, which necessitates an understanding of relationship between structure and function of the cell and cellular differentiation. They identify activities taking place in an organism related to metabolic activities in cells, including growth, regulation, transport, and homeostasis. Students differentiate between asexual and sexual reproduction.

Grade: 12
Life Systems: The Cell: Students explain the processes of life, which necessitates an understanding of relationship between structure and function of the cell and cellular differentiation. They identify activities taking place in an organism related to metabolic activities in cells, including growth, regulation, transport, and homeostasis. Students differentiate between asexual and sexual reproduction.

Subject: World Languages

Grade: 9
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 10
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 11
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Grade: 12
Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.